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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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http://archive.org/details/universityofmasst5758univ 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1939 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 10, 1957, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Miss Buxton, Messrs. Bartlett, Brett, 

Boyden, Brown, Cash in, Crowley, Desmond, 
Haigis, McDermott, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Dr. Boyden presented recommendations from the Committee 
on Faculty and Program of Study and after explanations by Dr. Boyden 
and President Mather, the Trustees acted as follows: 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the following new undergraduate 
courses : 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 83 Survey of Nuclear Engineering. 
An introduction to the principles of nuclear physics 
and a survey of problems involved in the design and 
operation of nuclear reactors. Among the topics to 
be considered are heat transfer, shielding, metallurgy, 
controls, waste disposal and health physics. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2; Physics 25, 
26; Mathematics 29, 30 or equivalent, and 
permission of the instructor. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 63 (I) Testing of Materials. A 
laboratory course for Mechanical Engineering students 
which includes some of the more advanced aspects of 
materials testing. Such topics as torsion testing, 
the strain gage rosette, photo-elasticity, and 
synamic testing are covered. 

1 3 -hour laboratory Credit 1 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 51 or 53 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the following new graduate courses: 



New 
Courses 



1940 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



EDUCATION 201 Field Studies in Education. Practice 
in the application of educational theory and technique 
in the public schools in such fields as supervision, 
administration and audio-visual organization. The 
student will prepare a comprehensive written report 
of his practice, experience and problems. A student 
cannot offer both Education 200 and 201 for the 
Master* s Degree. 

Prerequisite, Education 291, and Education Credit 4 
85 or one year's teaching experience. The Staff 

EDUCATION 257 Children's Literature. A study of the 
basic types and foremost works in the literature for 
children. Attention given to different interest and 
vocabulary levels and to the criteria for selection 
of lists for individual children. 
Prerequisite, Education 161 Credit 2-3 

Mrs. Trumbull 

EDUCATION 258 Implementing the Elementary School Pro- 
gram. An advanced course in curriculum design and 
classroom organization. It includes practices in 
planning, presenting, and evaluating programs in- 
volving integration of skills and activities for 
the various grade levels. 

Prerequisite, Education 160, and teaching Credit 2-3 
experience. Miss O'Leary 

EDUCATION 268 Administration of Audio-Visual Services. 
An advanced course designed to prepare audio-visual 
coordinators, directors and supervisors in the opera- 
tion of an audio-visual service. Problems to be 
discussed include: teacher training, selection of 
materials and equipment, storage, cataloging, distri- 
bution, maintenance and financial support. 
Prerequisite, Education 166 Credit 2-3 

Mr. Wyman 

EDUCATION 284 The Junior High School. The history of 
the Junior High School movement; the philosophy, aims 
and functions of a junior high school. Consideration 
will be given to the instructional program, including 
methods of instruction, the role of the basic skills, 
guidance, organization, extra curricular activities, 
and an examination and evaluation of current trends 
in Junior High School education. 

Prerequisites, Education 164 or 183 Credit 2-3 

Mr. Fennel 1 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

PSYCHOLOGY 246 Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavior Dis- 
orders in Children. The diagnosis and treatment of 
psychological maladjustments in infancy and childhood. 
A survey of treatment procedures, resources, and 
methods used in dealing with behavior and personality 
problems. Lectures, discussion and case demonstrations. 
Prerequisites, Psychology 182, 183, or 235, 
194 or 242, 252 and 253. Credit 3 

It was 

VOTED : To approve sabbatical leaves for John S. 
Bailey and Frederick E. Cole as follows: 

John S. Bailey, Associate Professor of Pomology, for 
six months at full pay for the period April 1 through 
September 30, 1957 for the purpose of studying the 
small fruit industry on the west coast. Professor 
Bailey plans to make his headquarters at the Univer- 
sity of California School of Agriculture at Davis, 
California. 

Frederick E. Cole, Extension Professor of Marketing, 
for six months at full pay for the period August 1, 
1957 through January 31, 1958 for the purpose of study- 
ing new developments in marketing of agricultural 
products. Professor Cole expects to study marketing 
activities in at least 20 states. 

It was 

VOTED : To appoint Joseph D. Burroughs as Extension 
Professor "A" in Human Relations effective 
February 1, 1957 at beginning salary of 
$8,372 which is two steps above the minimum 
for the grade. 

It was 

VOTED : To promote John H. Dittfach from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering effective February 1, 1957 at annual 
salary of $7,748. 

It was 

VOTED : To promote Theodore C. Caldwell from Professor 
to Head of the Department of History effective 
November 1, 1956 at annual salary of $8,680 
subject to upward revision under the Attorney 
General ruling relative to application of the 
Harrington Report to salary schedules. 



1941 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



John S. 
Bailey 



Frederick E. 
Cole 



Joseph D. 
Burroughs 



John H. 
Dittfach 



Theodore C. 
Caldwell 



1942 



TRUSTEE 



Harold C. 
Cary 



Hilo 
Kimball 



New 

Positions in 
Extension 
Service 



Army Air 
Force 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the request of Professor Harold C. 
Cary to be changed from Head of Department to 
Professor of History effective November 1, 1956 
at annual salary of $8,684. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the request of Milo Kimball to be 
shifted from Dean of the School of Business 
Administration to Professor of Business Ad- 
ministration effective March 3, 1957. It is 
understood that Mr. Kimball's salary as Dean 
will continue through March 2 and that he will 
be paid as Professor at annual rate of $8,372 
beginning March 3, 1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve establishment of the following new 
positions in the Extension Service with the 
understanding that all salaries through the 
fourth step will be paid from Federal Funds. 



Professor "A" in Food Engineering 
Instructors "A" to support the programs in 
Farm Management Agricultural Economics and 
Market ing 

Senior Clerk and Stenographer to support the 
above positions. 



It was 

VOTED ; Not to approve the recommended position of 

Assistant Professor "A" in the field of Home 
Economics to serve families in and around 
Boston. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the University to negotiate con- 
tracts with the Army and Air Force for flight 
training on a voluntary basis for ROTC and 
AFROTC students who qualify for and desire such 
training; also to authorize the University to 
negotiate a sub -contract or sub -contracts with 
CAA approved flying schools to provide this 
training. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds presented recommendations of that committee resulting 

from meeting on December 12, 1956 and after discussion, the 

Trustees 



I 



TRUSTEE 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve and accept the Master Plan of the 
campus as proposed by Mr. Shur cliff with the 
understanding that further study will be given 
the relocation of the north-south road through 
campus; and also with the understanding that 
every effort will be made to have Route 116 
eliminated from the campus and that the Master 
Plan will be so labeled as to show that this 
road should be eliminated. 

The Trustees discussed the offering of lots for sale to 

fraternities and sororities but felt that no vote should be taken 

until some determination has been made as to conditions of sale. 

Chairman Bart let t proposed and the Trustees unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman of the Board to 

request an opinion from the Attorney General 
on the conditions or restrictions that the 
Board may legally call for in any deed that 
may be given to buyers of the Sorority and 
Fraternity lots of land. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To accept Machmer Hall as completed December 
18, 1956 as Mass. State Project U-701, M. J. 
Walsh and Sons, Contractor, acceptance to be 
subject to the completion of certain minor 
items to the satisfaction of Treasurer Johnson. 

The Trustees 

VOTED ; To approve the following locations for new 
buildings; 

School of Education on the former Montague 
property along North Pleasant Street on the 
north edge of the University property. 

The ROTC Building to the west of the Liberal 
Arts Annex. 

The General Maintenance Building north west 
of the Power Plant. 

Dormitory #15 back of Fernald Hall - subject 
to reconsideration if borings prove this site 
to be unsatisfactory. 

The Faculty-Married Student Housing on the 
soccer area along Lincoln Avenue. 



1943 



Master 
Plan 



Sorority and 

Fraternity 

Lots 



Machmer 
Hall 



Building 
Program 



1944 



TRUSTEE 

Parking 
Area 

North 
College 



Research 
and Pro- 
duct ion 
Service 
Department 



Henry E. 

Warren 

Farm 



Appleton 
Farms 



Mastitis 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve the location of a new parking area 
to the west of Hasbrouck Hall. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To authorize the removal of North College at 
an early date. 

Trustee Brown, Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture 

presented recommendations of his committee resulting from meeting 

on December 17, 1956 and it was 

VOTED : To name the service department of the College 
of Agriculture the "Research and Production 
Service Department" and name the person in 
charge of this department "Head of the Depart- 
ment of Research and Production Service" with 
the rank of Associate Professor "A" effective 
February 1, 1957. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : Not to accept the proposed gift of the Henry 
E. Warren farm in Ashland, Massachusetts, 
and to convey to Mr. Warren their appreciation 
of his offer. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve the continuation of negotiations 

with Mr. Francis R. Appleton, Jr. to determine 
what arrangements he wishes to make relative 
to his proposal to give the Appleton Farms to 
the University and to establish a trust fund 
for their maintenance. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To authorize elimination of the 25 cents per 
sample fee for mastitis testing effective 
February 1, 1957. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve the following Dairy Cattle Certi- 
fication rates effective February 1, 1957: 



I 



TRUSTEE 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Advanced Registry 
Up to 12 cows 3X or 13 to 16 cows 3X or 

Up to 18 cows 2X 



19 to 24 cows 2X 



1 string $30.00 

additional strings 27.00 



$35.00 
32.00 



Herd Improvement Registry 
Up to 20 cows 3X or 21 to 30 cows 3X or 

Up to 30 cows 2X 31 to 45 cows 2X 



1 string $20.50 

additional strings 17.50 

The Trustees 



$25.50 
22.50 



VOTED : To authorize the establishment of a memorandum 
of agreement between the University of Massa- 
chusetts and the State Department of Agriculture 
relative to the use of space at the Waltham 
Field Station by the Department of Agriculture 
for the brucellosis testing program. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve the establishment of a memorandum 
of agreement between the Trustees of the 
University of Maine and the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts setting up a 
reciprocal arrangement for the training of 
students in Food Technology at the University 
of Massachusetts and the training of students 
in Agricultural Engineering at the University 
of Maine wherein the first two years of train- 
ing would be completed at the home institution 
of the student and the final two years at the 
institution in the other state with tuition to 
be charged at the in-state rate. 

President Mather said that on December 17 the Trustee 
Committee on Agriculture had also voted to recommend the approval 
of a revised memorandum of understanding between the University of 
Massachusetts and the U. S. Department of Agriculture on coopera- 
tive extension work in agriculture and home economics. The Uni- 
versity is strongly opposed to accepting the memorandum of under- 
standing as originally proposed by the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture and has drawn up a counter proposal which would retain 



1945 



Dairy Cattle 

Certification 

Service 



Brucellosis 



Exchange of 
Students 



Food 
Technology 



Agricultural 
Engineering 



Memorandum of 
Understanding 



U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agri- 
culture 



1946 



TRUSTEE 



Stephen 

Davis 

Scholarship 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the University's control of extension programs in Massachusetts. 

It was expected that the University's counter proposal would be 

ready for this meeting of the Board of Trustees after having been 

reviewed by a law firm. President Mather now expects that this 

proposal will be ready for the annual meeting of the Board in 

February and for this reason action was deferred on the committee's 

recommendation concerning this matter. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To convey the appreciation of the Board of 
Trustees to Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin B. Davis 
of 1185 Park Avenue, New York City for their 
gift in December 1956 of 500 shares of 
Paramount Pictures common stock and 200 
shares of Tri Continental Corporation common 
stock. 

It was 

VOTED : To use the gift of 500 shares of Paramount 
Pictures common stock and 200 shares of Tri 
Continental Corporation common stock pre- 
sented to the Trustees of the University by 
Mr. Benjamin B. Davis of 1185 Park Avenue, 
New York City, to establish a permanent 
scholarship fund to be known as the Stephen 
Davis Scholarship - the income whereof to be 
awarded each year to a male undergraduate in 
the University of Massachusetts who is a 
major in Liberal Arts or the Social Sciences 
and also an athlete. The selection of the 
beneficiary of the fund shall be made jointly 
by the Dean of the College of Arts and Science 
and by the Head of the Division of Physical 
Education. The beneficiary is to receive each 
year the full income from the fund so long as 
he remains in good standing in the University 
and continues to major in Liberal Arts or the 
Social Sciences, but in no event shall the 
beneficiary receive the income for more than 
four years. This scholarship shall be listed 
in the catalogue of the University, and the 
statement concerning it shall indicate that 
the scholarship is in memory of Stephen Davis 
of the Class of 1954. 



1 



1947 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that he feels strongly that the 
time has come when the University and the Trustees should take a 
clear stand in the matter of discriminatory provisions in the con- 
stitutions of fraternities and sororities. He presented the 
following statement: 

"It is the belief of the Trustees and Administration of 
the University of Massachusetts that discrimination be- 
cause of race, creed, or color, has no place on the 
campus of a university supported by and dedicated to 
the service of all the people of the Commonwealth. 
Such discrimination is an affront to the dignity and 
worth of the individual. It is antithetical to the 
basic purpose of a university. 

Recognizing these concepts the following policy is 

hereby adopted: 

1. The establishment at the University of Massa~ 
chusetts of additional fraternities or sorori- 
ties, having in their constitutions clauses 
which forbid the pledging, initiation, or free 
association of students on the basis of race, 
creed, or color, will not be permitted. 

2. Local chapters of national fraternities or 
sororities having discriminatory clauses in 
their constitutions, and now established at 
the University of Massachusetts, are to elimi- 
nate or secure release from such discriminatory 
provisions of their local and national constitu- 
tions on or before December 31, 1960. Failure 
to eliminate such clauses or to secure release 
from their provisions by December 31, 1960 

will mean that chapters of said fraternities 
or sororities at the University of Massachu- 
setts will be eliminated as recognized student 
organizations on this campus. Fraternities 
and sororities organized locally or solely at 
the University of Massachusetts are to remove 
such discriminatory provisions immediately. 
Failure to remove such clauses will mean that 
such local chapters will be eliminated as 
recognized student organizations on this campus." 

After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : That this statement be the policy of the 
Trustees. 



Fraternity and 

Sorority 

Discrimination 



1948 



TRUSTEE 



Sigma Kappa 
Sorority 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that additional policy needs to be 
adopted relative to the local chapter of Sigma Kappa. This 
sorority does not have any discriminatory provision in its con- 
stitution and the chapter on the campus of the University of Massa- 
chusetts has not engaged in any discriminatory practices. Nonethe- 
less, the chapter has been under fire because of actions or 
attitudes alleged to have been taken or held by Sigma Kappa 
national. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the following policy: 

"Since at this date the allegations of discrimination 
directed at the national sorority of Sigma Kappa have 
not been legally established; since this sorority does 
not operate under a constitution with any restrictive 
or discriminatory clauses relating to race, creed, or 
color; since the Beta Eta chapter of Sigma Kappa at 
the University of Massachusetts has not engaged in any 
discriminatory practice in the pledging, initiation, 
or free association of students on the basis of race, 
creed, or color; and since the Administration and Board 
of Trustees cannot sanction punishment or decision on 
the basis of "guilt by association", particularly when 
such guilt has not been legally established; therefore, 
it is recommended that no administrative action be 
taken against the local chapter (Beta Eta) of Sigma 
Kappa at the University of Massachusetts, and that 
this chapter be continued as a recognized student 
organization on this campus." 

The Trustees discussed the recommendations of the Uni- 
versity Committee on Honorary Degrees and 

VOTED : To award the following honorary degrees at 
the June 1957 Commencement with the under- 
standing that the recipient must be present 
in person to receive the degree. 

Abram L. Sachar, President of Brandeis Uni- 
versity - LL.D. 

Charles Munch, Conductor of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra - Mus.D. 

Carl P. Swanson, U of M '37, Professor of 
Biology, Johns Hopkins University - D.Sc. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In addition to these three recommended by the University 

Committee, the Trustees unanimously 

VOTED: To award the honorary degree LL.D. to Frank 
L. Boyden at the June 1957 Commencement with 
the understanding that he will be present in 
person to receive the award. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve step -rate increases for members of 
the professional staff of the University in 
accordance with state schedule as earned and 
payable during the months of December 1956 
and January 1957. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5 o'clock. 




Secretary 



[ /(t^yfM. **~r(j< 



I 



aU^JO^M Chairman 



1949 



Step -rate 
Increases 



1950 



TRUSTEE 



Nominat ing 
Committee 



Annual 
Report 



Degrees 



United States 
Department of 
Agriculture 



Memorandum of 
Understanding 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 28, 1957, 12 noon, Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Boy den, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Crowley, Desmond, 
Haigis, McDermott, Perry, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee: Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Crowley and Taber. 

President Mather presented his annual report for 1956 
and it was 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Chairman Bartlett complimented the President for the out- 
standing accomplishments set forth in the report. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty and of the Presi- 
dent , it was 

VOTED : To confer earned baccalaureate degrees to 

the following candidates effective February 
14, 1957 (See attached list) 

Upon the recommendation of the Graduate School and of 

the President, it was 

VOTED : To confer the following earned graduate 
degrees effective February 14, 1957. 
(See attached list) 

The Trustees discussed the revised memorandum of under- 
standing between the University and the United States Department 
of Agriculture relative to the conduct of cooperative extension 
work in Agriculture and Home Economics. President Mather said 
that this revised agreement has not yet been approved by the USDA, 
but it is in the form desired by the University. After discussion, 



TRUSTEE 



1951 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the proposed agreement with 
USDA as attached with these minutes. 

President Mather reviewed steps by which he had prepared 

a recommended athletic policy statement for the University. He 

said that the Trustee Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

had met with officers of the University and with representatives 

of the University Athletic Council. At this meeting it was agreed 

that a positive statement of athletic policy should be adopted and 

made known both to the faculty and to the general public. The 

President was authorized to prepare such statement for approval by 

the Board. This statement as presented today was mailed to all 

Trustees approximately two weeks ago and the President now 

recommends its adoption. After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To aporove the attached statement on 
athletic policy for the University of 
Massachusetts. 

President Mather and Secretary Burke discussed the pro- 
posed amendments to the By-Laws of the Board and reviewed the need 
for bringing the By-Laws up to date. Chairman Bartlett reminded 
the Trustees that the proposed changes have been in their hands 
for some time for their study. After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt changes in the By-Laws of the 
Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts in accordance with the 
attached outline. 

President Mather said that the University has been 
negotiating with the Boston Regional Security Office to obtain Uni- 
versity clearance for handling of classified government research 
contracts. There are two general methods of obtaining clearance. 
One is through the security investigation of all officers and 



Athletic 
Policy 



By-Laws 



Classified 
Government 
Research 
Contracts 



•7 eJ/i 



TRUSTEE 



Step-rate 
Increases 



Wal tham 
Field 
Si. at ion 



Stephen 

Davis 

Scholarship 



Convent ions 



Military 
Property 
Custodian 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustees, and the other is for the trustees to delegate the 

handling of research contracts to the officers of the University 

and to exclude themselves from access to security records. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the attached policy for classi- 
fied contracts. 

It was unanimously 

V OTED ; To approve step-rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with the state schedule as 
earned and payable during the months of 
February and March of 1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the introduction into the 
current session of the General Court of 
a bill being prepared by the Attorney 
General to authorize the Trustees to con- 
vey land at the Waltham Field Station to 
the County of Middlesex for the purpose of 
widening Beaver Street in Waltham. 

It was 

VOTED : That the gift of common stock from Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin Davis as described in the 
Board minutes of January 10, 1957 be 
entered on the endowment funds of the Uni- 
versity at the market price as of the date 
of transfer, November 29, 1956 as follows: 

500 shares Paramount Pictures @ 27 3/4 - $13,875 
200 shares Tri- Continental Corp. @ 26% - 5 , 300 



$19,175 



It was 

VOTED : To adopt the attached statement entitled 
"Policy Governing Conventions at the 
University of Massachusetts". 

It was 

VOTED: That effective March 1, 1957, Hobart Ludden, 
Business Manager, be relieved of his duties 
as Custodian of Military Property and. L. 
Lawrence Taylor, Assistant Treasurer, be 
appointed Custodian of Military Property. 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

V OTED : To accept the gift of Murray D. Lincoln of 
the Class of 1914 of one share of common 
stock of the West Superior, Inc. (An Ohio 
Corporation that is to be liquidated) and 
that the stock be placed on the books at 
par value of $50 to be adjusted to the 
actual amount received on liquidation. 
The purpose of the gift is to be carried 
out in establishing the Murray D. Lincoln 
Student Loan Fund as an endowment fund of 
the University. 

On the recommendation of the President s it was 

VOTED ; To approve the attached list of promotions 
and appointments in accordance with the 
terms as set forth after each name. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the establishment of 2 new 

temporary positions of Associate Professor 
"A" and 1 new temporary position of Assistant 
Professor "A" effective January 28, 1957 and 
to approve appointments to these positions 
as follows: 

Mary E. Macdonald Assoc. Prof. "A" Nursing $7,436 1/28/57 

Mary E. Gilmore Assoc. Prof. "A" Nursing 7,436 i/28/57 
Gellestrina T. 

DiMaggio Asst. Prof. "A" Nursing 5,889 1/28/57 

Also on the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To name Dr. Wallace F. Powers, Head of the 
Department of Physics, emeritus effective 
on his retirement in June of 1957 

President Mather discussed the negotiations which the 

University officers have been carving on with officials of the 

General Electric plant in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. General 

Electric wants the University to establish a branch at Pittsfield 

to provide college grade engineering courses for GE employees and 

is willing to pay the entire cost of this instruction. The current 

proposal is that General Electric establish a trust fund to cover 



1953 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Student Loan 
Fund 



Promot ions 

and 

Appointments 



Wallace F. 
Powers 



General 
Electric 



1954 



TRUSTEE 



Faculty 
Senate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the costs of travel, instruction, administration and all other 

costs and that the University will provide administration and 

instruction. Dr. Bartlett's lav firm has examined the proposed 

contract and is satisfied with its contents and form. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTE D : To approve the attached "Trust for Establish- 
ment of Certain Engineering Courses in 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts by the University 
of Massachusetts". 

President Mather emphasized that this is necessarily 
somewhat of an experiment; that the University will do its best 
to make this program succeed; and that it may well be a pilot 
program for the operation of community colleges in other parts of 
Massachusetts. All persons concerned have agreed to re-examine 
the operation and objectives after the first two years' work have 
been xompleted. Most of the students concerned will be employees 
of General Electric who will be studying part time and therefore 
wi3 1 need four years' time for the. completion of two academic 
years of work. The program will also be open to others in the 
Pittsfield area who are qualified and who will pay a pro-rate 
share of the costs. 

President Mather said that the proposed constitution of 
the University Faculty Senate has been examined and re-examined 
by the administration and the Trustees and has been modified so 
that the proposal now before the Board should meet the needs of 



the faculty, the administration and the Trustees. After discussion 



it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the constitution of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Faculty Senate 
as attached. 



1 



TRUSTEE 



! 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following resolution: 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their sorrow at the death of 
their beloved friend and colleague, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
McNamara. 

Mrs. McNamara served on the Board of Trustees con- 
tinuously since 1936 and was tireless in her devotion 
to the cause of higher education. Her warm and friendly 
personality, her balanced wisdom and counsel, her 
abiding concern for trueness to principle were ever a 
source of inspiration to her fellow trustees. 

In token of our affection and admiration for 
Mrs. McNamara, we direct that this resolution be in- 
scribed in the records of the Board and that copy be 
sent to her family. 

The Nominating Committee reported and it was 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the following slate of officers and 
committee members for the Board of Trustees 
of the Uniiversity of Massachusetts for the 
year 1957 : 

President, Foster Furcolo 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bart let t 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman John J. Desmond 
Grace A. Buxton Lewis Perry 

Dennis M. Crowley 



Committee on Agr iculture an d Horticu lture 



Harry D. Brown, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Dennis M. Crowley 

C ommittee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis, Jr. 

Committee on Finance 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 



L. Roy Hawes 
Ernest Hoftyzer 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



1955 



Mrs. Elizabeth 
L. McNamara 



Committees 



1956 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Committee on Recognized Stude nt Activities 

Dennis M. Crowley, Chairman Grace A. Buxton 
Frank L. Boyden Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Ralph F. Taber 



Committee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 

Execut ive Committe e 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



John W. Haigis, Jr. 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




ecretary 



<T1a^X» L+sf?c^iA£ZU Chai 



rman 



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tictad l3pon &t Faculty 

?, 1957 






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SXA3 i I ■: "..':'■":■•:■... G - UC 

TM3 t .:.{JS3£i 



W S 8 since its founding in 1863s the £ Ifassacbusetts 

has recognized fcn© necessity of pre ■. :e than teel A and. classical in* 

struct ion for you»g men asad .. m® in preparation for adult life and" 

MEHE£S e a sound physical education program is ten tsed as a 

essential need for the development of a healthy personality, able to absorb 

end use wisely the intellectual offering^ of a University m 

THERMS, the physical education program bos sot feeiat pace with the 

progress of the University in other areas 

BS XT SESGLVE3 fcfeat the trustees of the If Elver city of Massachusetts 

&%~£.qzs® the following policy and direct the administration o»d faculty to take 

the necessary steps for its implementation: 

!• file Required pliysiccl education p-:oaroa for both i^an and 
worsen students, in fcn© fresfeisan and sopfeo&cro years, shall 
continue to be ais essential part of the Ba&versity*s re- 
Gairemerit for the underigrsdHate degree. 

2* the intradural athletic program snail foe staffed and equipped 
to meet the seeds of all students ssfeo desire to participates 
and the University shell encourage participation threngb a 

varied program including sports with "carry-over 71 value for 
life after graduation, 

3, Professional courses in physical education shall be offered 
for those students desiring to asjor or odnor in physical 
education as a prelude to careers as coaches or teacher- 
coaches . 

4. Consistent i-7itn present policies en admissions and academic 
standards , ttie intercollegiate athletic pro-grass snail be.de-. 
veloped to a point tiiere it is representative of the best. : 
efforts of tfee llaivercity., with aims as.d ideals of achieved 

css^arable to tliose expected of the academic departssgnts, 
ais developisent shall proceed in accord t?itb policies and 

regulations of the national College Athletic Association, the 
Eastern College Athletic Conference and the Yankee Conference^ 
in each o£ which the University saaintdina ^esfeersnip. 



MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 

BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AND THE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

ON COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Whereas the University of Massachusetts has under its control Federal and 
State funds for extension work in agriculture, home economics, and related sub- 
jects which are and may be supplemented by funds contributed for similar purposes 
by counties and other organizations and individuals within said State, and the 
United States Department of Agriculture has funds appropriated directly to it by 
Congress which can be spent for extension work in the State of Massachusetts, and 

Whereas the Commonwealth of Massachusetts established an Extension Service 
at the Massachusetts Agricultural College under a Director of Extension In 1909, 
and 

Whereas the Smith-Lever Act establishing Cooperative Extension Work on a 
nation-wide basis was accepted both in funds and in purpose by the General Court 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under an Act of Acceptance approved June 29, 
1914, and 

Whereas, County Extension Services have been established in Massachusetts 
since 1914 and are authorized to conduct extension programs under Chapters 128 
and 74 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, and 

Whereas, program and administrative policies and procedures are cooperatively 
established in the annual state-county agreements between the University of Massa- 
chusetts and the various County Extension Services; 

Therefore, with a view to securing economy and efficiency in the conduct of 
extension work in the State of Massachusetts the President of the University of 
Massachusetts acting subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees of the 
said University of Massachusetts and the Secretary of Agriculture of the United 
States, hereby execute the following Memorandum of Understanding with reference 
to cooperative relations between said University of Massachusetts and the United 
States Department of Agriculture for the organization and conduct of extension 
work in agriculture and home economics in the State of Massachusetts. 

I. The University of Massachusetts agrees: 

(a) To organize and maintain at said institution a definite and distinct 
administrative division for the management and conduct of all coopera- 
tive extension work in agriculture and home economics, with a Director 
selected by the institution and satisfactory to the Department. 

(b) To administer through such division thus organized, known as the 
Cooperative Extension Service, any and all funds it has or may hereafter 
receive for such work from appropriations made by Congress or the State 
Legislature, by allotment from its Board of Trustees or from any other 
sources; 



J 



(c) To accept the responsibility for conducting all educational work in 
the fields of agriculture and home economics and subjects related 
thereto as authorized by the Smith- Lever Act as amended and other 
Acts supporting cooperative extension work, and such phases of other 
programs of the Department as are primarily educational, which the 
Department has been authorized to carry on within the State. 



- 2 - 
II. The United States Department of Agriculture agrees: 

(a) To maintain in the Department a Federal Extension Service which, Under 
the direction of the Secretary, (1) shall be charged with the adminis- 
tration of the Smith-Lever Act as amended and other Acts supporting 
cooperative extension work insofar as such administration is vested in 
the Department; (2) shall have primary responsibility for and leader- 
ship in all educational programs under the jurisdiction of the Depart- 
ment (except the graduate school); (3) shall be responsible for co- 
ordination of all educational phases of other programs of the Depart- 
ment, except the graduate school; and (4) shall act as the liaison 
between the Department and officials of the Land-Grant Colleges and 
Universities on all matters relating to cooperative extension work in 
agriculture and home economics and educational activities relating 
thereto. 

(b) To conduct through the University of Massachusetts all extension work 
in agriculture and home economics and subjects relating thereto 
authorized by Congress to be carried on within the State except those 
activities which by mutual agreement it is determined can most appro- 
priately and effectively be carried out directly by the Department. 

III. The University of Massachusetts and the United States Department of Agriculture 
mutually agree t 

(a) That subject to the approval of the President of the University of 
Massachusetts acting for and with the approval of the Trustees, and the 
Secretary of Agriculture, or their duly appointed representatives, all 
cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics in the 
State of Massachusetts involving the use of Federal funds shall be 
planned under the joint supervision of the Director of the Cooperative 
Extension Service of Massachusetts and the Administrator of the Federal 
Extension Service; and that approved plans for such cooperative extension 
work in the State of Massachusetts shall be carried out through the 
Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Massachusetts in 
accordance with the terms of individual project agreements. 

(b) That all state personnel employed by the University of Massachusetts and 
all county personnel employed by the various county Boards of Trustees 
for Aid to Agriculture under the existing agreements between the Univer- 
sity and said counties, and who are subject to the various laws in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts pertaining to state and county employees, 
and who are also granted appointments by the Department as cooperative 
agents without compensation for extension work in agriculture, home 
economics, and related subjects shall be joint representatives of the 
University of Massachusetts and the United States Department of Agri- 
culture, unless otherwise expressly provided in the project agreement. 



(c) That the cooperation between the University of Massachusetts and the 
United States Department of Agriculture shall be plainly set forth in 
all publications or other printed matter issued and used in connection 
with said cooperative extension work by either the University of Massa- 
chusetts or the United States Department of Agriculture. 



I 



I 



- 3 - 

(d) That annual plans of work for the use of Smith-Lever and other Federal 
funds in support of cooperative extension work shall be made by the 
Cooperative Extension Service of the State of Massachusetts and shall 
be subject to the approval of the Secretary of Agriculture in accord- 
ance with the terras of the Smith-Lever Act as amended or other applicable 
laws, and when so approved shall be carried out by the Cooperative Extension 
Service of the said State of Massachusetts. 

IV. The University of Massachusetts and the United States Department of Agriculture 
further mutually agree: 

(a) That the Department of Agriculture shall make final determination on 
any proposed supplementary memoranda of understanding or similar docu- 
ments, including those with other agencies, affecting the conduct of 
cooperative extension work after consultation with appropriate desig- 
nated representatives of the Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, and 
that such supplementary memoranda of understanding or similar documents 
shall be activated in the State of Massachusetts only with the mutual 
agreement and consent of the Director of the Extension Service acting 
subject to the approval of the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts. 

(b) That the University of Massachusetts will make arrangements affecting 
the conduct of cooperative extension work with agencies of the Depart- 
ment, or with other Federal agencies, only through the Administrator of 
the Federal Extension Service, or in accordance with an existing general 
agreement which has been approved by him. 

(c) That all memoranda and similar documents hereafter executed affecting 
cooperative extension work, whether between agencies of the Department 
or between State Cooperative Extension Services and agencies of the 
Department, shall be within the framework of, and consistent with the 
intent and purpose of, this Memorandum of Understanding. 

(d) That all memoranda and agreements affecting policies in cooperative 
extension work shall be reviewed periodically by appropriately desig- 
nated representatives of the Land-Grant Colleges and Universities and 
the Secretary of Agriculture for the purpose of determining whether 
modification is necessary or desirable to meet more effectively current 
developments and program needs. 

V. This memorandum shall take effect when it is approved by the President of 
the University of Massachusetts and the Secretary of Agriculture of the 
United States, and shall remain in force until it is expressly abrogated in 
writing by either one of the signers or his successor in office. The agree- 
ment executed June 29, 1914 shall be deemed abrogated upon the effective 
date hereof. 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DATE BY 



President 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

DATE BY 

Secretary 



PROPOSED CHESSES IB BY- <3? TDK BOOT « TBIIOTES 

" ' TUB UMIVERSm OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Article I. - no e ' a£kr 
Article II - now reads 



Thor- stall be three stated actings of the Trustees in each year, 
S* first to be known as the enseal sseetir© at tfiich officers shall 
cK and thecal *epo« «**>, Ml bo held at the S«a 

S U ?e°« Boston in February at the call of the Cfaaiiwn. or at aneb 
rj£» as the Trustees at any previous Md« war determine, lha 
Si^LLetina shall be held in fcaherst teteg the comence-ent 
SSS *«S«*i shall be held in *Ae>at or Boston in 
£ fail The dly and tor of each of these actings *»U *•»»* 
hv thT^rMU of the Board, and the place of holding aay of eaa 
~eto. o^r thL L aaatins l« **«™t *rit» the «o»wc««t 
Siodtsy be chaaged by the Chaimnn giving ****• f the change to 
ffi^llS. % ttKoJ. at least 7 day. before the date set by hta 
for the oeetlng- 

,„.,,, -..tinsa say be called at any tise by the Coalman of she 
S^l^raf or witten approval of « -£** * e f LffhS 
a" the Roard or coon written re<jw=st of the Governor or of any terras 
?; mtaU! or of tte PneUaiit of the ttHvaraity. Such recasts 
S t'al to the Secretary «ho shell thereupon give written 
££ee to each aaafcer of the Board at least seven **«?*£[?»£* 
tee set for the meeting, stating therein the eajacc for «**<*£• 
w£bi is celled unless such notice stall be wived by ell ^ahe.e 
of the Board, 

It is pxoposed to chaaga Article II to wsad as follow* 



MEETINGS 



Article IX. fere shall be three 8t<stcd seat lags of the Tmstzez in each W m; 
the first to be teo^ as the atmal -eating •* *** officers shall be cheaea 
aaa the armual report f*ade, .ball be in IMrj. »* second meting shall be 
during the cc^Bcc^mt period. • The third iseetiag shall be in tha fall. The 
"day, hoar, and placa of each of these msatinso shall be flaad by the Cbair«« of 

the S and «*ic* shall be slvaa by tha Secretly to all «a*er* of tha 

Beard at least ? days bofora the data set for tha s?eati»g. 

Special votings nay bz called at say tiat at tha ra*uast ©f tha 

Ghi m oi the Board, of the Governor, of aiay th»a Trastees, or at tha Fresitot 

of eha Uaiwrsity. Such repeats shell be nada to the Secretary t*o shall 



-2- 

thereupon given written notice to each rseisber of the Board at least 7 days 
prior co the date set for the steeting, stating therein the object for uhich 
the isseting is called unless such notice shall be waived by all tEetabers of 
the Board. Minutes of all Trustee eseetings shall be sent by the Secretary to 
all BKKEbers of the Board as soon as possible after each meeting. 

Article II - reason for change 

To provide greater flexibility as to tine and place of 
Trustee meetings. 

Article XXX - no change 

Article IV - no change 

Article V - no change 

Article VI - no change 

Article VII - now reads 

The Faculty of the University shall consist of the President of the 

University, certain administrative officers as listed below, and members 
of the professional staff for Eesident Teaching, Experiment Station, 

and Extension Service. The administrative officers mentioned above 
shall be Dean of the University, Bean of Agriculture and Director of 
the Experiment Station, Associate Dean of Agriculture and Director ©f 
the Extension Service, Director of Short Courses, Dean of the Graduate 

School, Treasurer of the University, Secretary of the University, 
Assistant Treasurer, Business Manager, Registrar of the University, 
Librarian of the University, Bean of the College of Arts and Science, 
Deans of Schools, Heads of Divisions and Departments as may be 
appointed from time to tine. 

All administrative officers and seeders of the professional staff 

shall be included isa the list of the Faculty to be printed in the 
annual catalogue and shall take parfe in Faculty isee tings. 



-4- 

University within the limitations of the budget and such engagements shall 
be subject to the confirmation of the Beard of Trustees. Ko new salaried 
position© in the institution shall be created without the express vote of the 
Trustees. 

Article VIIX - reason for change 

To correspond with change proposed for Article VII. 

Article IX. Paragraph two of Article IS now reads as follows? 

In tho event ©f a vacancy in the office of the President of the 
University, or during his absence or inability to attend to the 
duties of that office, the Dean of the University or sosie other 
officer who may be designated by the Presidents shall perform 
the duties of the President until some other person is appointed 
President pro tern, by the Board of Trustees, or until the office 
is regularly filled. 

It is proposed to change this paragraph to read as follows: 
DUTIES CF THE FACULTY 

Article IS. In the event of a vacancy in the office of the President of the 
University, or during his absence ©r inability to attend to the duties of that 
office, the Provost of the University or soes other officer who may be 
designated by the President, shall perform the duties of the President until 
sose other person is appointed President pro tem. by the Board of Trustees, or 
until the office is regularly filled. 

Article IX - reason for cbame 



Recognition of change in title from Dean to Provost. 

Article X - now reads 

Administrative officers and members of the professional staff of 
the University shall draw pay raerathly at a fised yearly rate froa 
the time they enter upon their duties. Other es^Jloyees shall 
draw pay for such length of time and in such manner as is agreed 
upon at the ties they are engaged. 

It is proposed to discontinue Article X and to renuniber the follow!^ 
articles so that present Article SI becomes Article X, etc. 



-5- 



Ayticle X - reason for change 

The University neu pays on weakly basis but It seems better 
to emit reference to method of payoent in By-Lo&o. 



Present Article XI - noxf reads 

The Faculty of the University shall organise «lth the President 
of the University as President, the Secretary of the University 
as Secretary, and such other officers as they dees expedient. 
They shall be required to hold at least one meeting during each 

semester of the university year, and a record of each Beetles* 
with the noises of the faculty saeafeers present, shall be kept 

by the Secretary and shall be open at all tines to the inspection 
of the Board of Trustees or any sealer thereof. 

Xt shall he the duty of all administrative officers and isetaber© 
of the professional staff of the University resident in Aaheret 
to attend regularly the Faculty sheetings and take part therein 
unless excused by the President. 

It is proposed to renussber Article XI to Article Send to amsnd 
it 30 that it will read as follow: 

MEETINGS OS? THE FACULTY 



Article X. The Faculty of the University shall organise with the President of 
the University as President, the Secretary of the University as Secretary, and 
such other officers as they dees expedient. They shall be required to hold at 
least one meeting during each semester of the university year, and a record of 
each nesting shall be kept by the Secretary and shall fee open at all tisses to 
the inspection of the Board of Trustees or any s&en&er thereof. 

It shall he the duty of all administrative officers and tass&ers of 
the professional staff of the University resident in Amherst to attend 
regularly the Faculty tsec tings and take part therein unless excused bj the 
President. 

Article XI - reason for change 

¥hen the faculty was very ss&ll there s&ay have been a point 

to keeping a record ©f attendance, filth the present faculty 
numbering in the hundreds this point seetaa no longer valid. 
Also, mashers of the faculty object to having attendance 
recorded - calling it a high school practice. 



-6- 



Present Article XXI - no change 
Present Article XIII - no change 

Present Article XIV - now reads 

The seal of the University is described as follows: A circle two 

inches in diameter on the circumference of which the following 
inscription shall appear. "University of Massachusetts , As&erst 
1863." Within the circle shall be the Coat of Arms of the 
CoasBonwealth of Massachusetts. The Treasurer will fee custodian 
of the University Seal. 

It is proposed to renus&er this Article to Article XIII and grand 
the wording 3© that it will read as follows: 

THE UiirVERSOT SEAL 



>TTTnMWB»>ra« 



Article SIII. The seal of the University is described as follows: A circle 
two inches in diaseter on the clrcunforence of which the following inscription 

shall appear. "University of Massachusetts s Aisherst 1863." Within the circle 
shall be the Goat of Arms of the Coissonwealth of Massachusetts. The Secretary 
will he custodian ©f the University Seal. 
Article _ XIV - reason, for change 



The last sentence of Article XIV is inconsistent with paragraph 
1 of Article I and inconsistent with the present huBirtBm pro- 
cedures . 



Present Article X? - would be renuobered as Article ZIV with no change in 

wording. 



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-■.'.'.'■ .' . ' .: ... 

.'..■■■ 



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Recommended Pc erning Conve 

at University of Massachusetts 

Aa a public service the Unive Massachui will make it 
buildings and facilities, available to the citizens', of the Comrnonwealtfa 
conferences, conventions, institutes., :-;orkshops 9 seminars and similar activitii 
whenever they will not conflict with the educational and student programs of the 
University <> Ko person or group will be permitted to use the University buildin: 
or facilities except on the specific invitation of the President of the Universe 

All groups that are Invited to the Amherst Campus for more than one day or 
that involve overnight accommodations that do not formally register for instruc- 
tion or pay fees for courses of instruction offered by the University shall be 
considered conventions and shall register with the Conventions Committee. In 
order to provide for an orderly scheduling of functions 9 the University Calendar 
will be maintained by the Director of the Student Union and all non-academic 
activities shall be scheduled on this calendar « 

Effective March 1, 1957 the management of the conventions fund by the 
Associate Alumni will cease and it will be re-established as an activity of the 
Student Union under the management and control of the Director of the Student 
Union*, This activity will be self-supporting with any excess of income over 
expenditures inuring to the Student Union General Fund e 

For the purpose of maintaining the conventions activity on a self-supporting 
basis ;, the following charges and fees are established effective March 1 9 1957 s 

Registration Fee: $1 P 00 per person for two days or less» 



-,- M .-•. I MWUHH 



I 



$2o00 per_ person for periods in excess 
of two daySo 

Registration fees are payable to the Conventions 
Fund of the Student Union General Fund to cover over- 
head expenses of administering the conventior 

No registration fee will be charged the 



I 



following' 

lo Youth Groups (i e eo, 4-H 9 FFA, 

Boys 8 State j etc) 
2= University Faculty and Staff 

Alumni Groups 
4o Groups that are official guests of 
the University 

Room Rent p is - Payable to the University for use of 
dormitory rooms 

25$ per night » Youth Groups «=■ bed only 

50$ per night - Youth Groups and - bedding furnished 

children under 12 years 
50$ per night - Alumni Groups 
$l o 00 per night - Adults - no bedding or service 

In addition to the rossn rentals listed above, 
the Conventions Committee may establish charges to 
cover the <sost of furnishing such items as bedding, 
towels , soaps, service, etCo which will be income 
to the Conventions Fund of the Union*, 



Meals 



i 



Charges for meals served conventions will be 
established by the Manager of the Boarding Kail or the 
Director of the Student Union on the basis of the type 
of meals served in each, location „ Guarantees and 
reservations may be required when meals are requested 
for conventions c 



Other Charges 



The Conventions Committee and the Director of 
the Student Union may establish reasonable charges to 
cover the costs of all other services furnished to 
conventions such as personal services, materials and 
supplies, moviDg 3 transportation, signs* exhibits, and 
rental of space in the Student Union building » Alls 
income and expenditures from these sources shall be 
on account of the Conventions Fund of the Union<, 

No charge for space will be made in any 
public building on the campus except as specified 

above 



The President of the University is authorised to waive or modify any or 
all of the fees or charges established herein whenever in his judgment there 
is sufficient reason to do so. 



1/3/57 



Approved by the 
BU8EMB* B ° ard 1/10/1957 

of cssaun e amsRs ttsait #3 

• •■ aa ©£ else day of 9 1957 by &$& 

CTIZC CONMK, ® | 5rk coipontte having a peioeipal 

. -a of a £a Pi^tsfleM, MunadnMftea, C&£ » sraetes called 

Settlor. ®sd the ftNn4 o£ stostees of c&e uaiwraity c£ 
ag uate a vivtoe of Hassaclnmtts Gaaiaxal tes 

Ote Lttea) Chapter 15, tl^ 20, aa f, (teei^f^ aaae- 

tlaea call Zfcu8f&ea) a - Gj 

lo : ' l**s » ■*« a gift ®«r @ite $m befcalff ®£ che 

Cvmaovmrnlth of ltviaaeteaetta for the aaa of the Qtalimity of Kusaaafcuaatta, 
a sts ;i3a of fete <*» ItiH «*£ Maaaachaaaata ^iseisig oader &M by 

vlvtoe of: iGunaeliuaotta Oaaacal tea (Teraoaeanazy Sdielim) OM*t»r 75, Seetien i, 
23 as . trust Co provide easeain adaaational facilities £a the City of' 

Pitts .- in £hs tea ilth of Mac s ^ ; ^ B ..^ p^., fco mk@ 

aoch 3 gift os gi£s@ m here 

2 * * t@ « *•*»* such gift or & . i enauta such 

visteo of tha pr^isto of Saeeteo 7, 
■h ef ga: . 75. 

■ -m, CSanaral EUetric and 

» C$10)* reeeipt 
■ tad by tl 3s *,«■ .11 

« «1 ttaotrtc Q }i£y 

° f aataeh, :se pn i ' u ' , M ^, ^^^ 

- and . istored &y <&, ttustceo upon t&o folic ; t^sfcs: ' 



Trustees shall cause 'to be established and aaintainad, uithin 
th rsity of etts but located is the City of Pittsfield in the 

Lth of Ms ;etts, ec 9 of instruction is sui&ehle subjects such 

that perse .3 complete the i to the satisfaction of the Trustees ©hall fee 
to rec s of I ley of Science in Esgiosering conferred 

by i Iteersity ta to the sassa effect as if such persons had 

at ■ courses of instruction gives ia the facilities ©f the University 
of ':s la the Totsa of said Cs^iosaseaith. 

. For : epos's of establ iud er "-ssis^ the courses of 
seified in &rtiela FZ1 & the Trustees shall acquire suit- 
Escllities, ©hell a^loy suitable aestaaie, administrative, clericals 
b! aM other personnel, atsd shell provide such supplies, sia&erials, 
.a, fixtures, saachinery and e it all ia such cesser ©r tsaaners, 
by such ^a@as asd on such seres as shall be in accordance *zith las? and otherwise 
as in theis? sole discretion the Trustees shall ^leesa mest expedient; provided, 
• 9 that the Trustees sh&Il net sake any stsgle capital expenditure in aa 
omit of $109 or s©ra without prior notice to aad written approval of CSener&l 
metric. Sees aoti* i to, and ©nek approval given by 3 the officer 

•2 ex; If of Oaaaral Electric or any person namcl by 
i ia a vrit ss. In addition to asy other property 

General Electric undertakes to 
contribute :s suitable for gat and naJ snee of said 

go? istastee as it can ia aefairieg and 

pre-. ; nher :: ■;.£ hy the Trustees to essaeete the trusts hereof. 

SB i All property given* transferred ©r conveyed fey General Electric 
or say other person for the . ;s hereof and the proceeds of eush property 
all fee applies to the objects specified ia Article S3GG8D hereof, to the 
sat ©£ all other expenses incurred hj the University of H&ssschusatta ia 



1 



I 



lintainiag tl ;> ©£ instruction specified in Article 

FIRST :, including, Tjifchoet limitation, administrative, a&d transportation 

its, sue to the es$sense of heldiisg, Esanaging -;d.nistering and Investing 

such :rty. 

.III: Persons designated fey General Electric and tjho otherwise @set 
sn« the aeadessie require 1 la&iished by the University of 

»tta obeli idmitted to and continued in the courses of instruction 
referred to in Article FIRST hereof, the Trusts say in their sole discretion 
adsait- tc h courses g 2 so dec I £ provided that each 

seah other person shall as a condition or" atiateslott contribute* ©r there shall 
be coatril i £*@r hi®, for the ef the University of M&saaeiiusetta in 

*st for the purposes h £ as the Trustees rssy in their sole 

discrete ka hie m able share of the cost o£ the courses to 

* is adaitted. It is us tteed that in Lag contributions 3 General 
Electric does set intend , ai .ot foa . rated, eo hear any expense in- 
d. fey the Srssteos hereunder in ss of the cost of providing courses 

iar for persoi bed fey it, 
FIFTH; She Trustees shall furnish to General Electric £tes jeer to year 
: per student to the University of Massachusetts for ©curses 
to be c riLlahed hereunder. 1st Laser than slsty- (SO) days prior to the 

at of actrie shall pay over to the 

Trustees a wist sufficient - to cover the costs so est ad. for such acedaaic 
period €or so s®ny &zmM®Zii --.ay fee designated by General Electric and accepted 
fey the University as students. Should General Electric fail to sake such pay- 

tha T all bo 1 no obligation t© provide such 
3a. If - durfo tried the Trustees determine 

the a d is insufficient to seat the cost© for General Electric 
designated students for such year and shall notify General Electric of the 



jFaeats v ■ iral Slectrlc shall pay over to the 

Trustees fcher fi In the event that General Electric fails to 

lit local, :ly upon receipt ©i sh notification,, 

the .'ortfctfith' terminate all courses of Instruction feeing given 

£or such eeadesie period. 

SZS&H: It is anticipated that the Trustees will has?© certain initial 
adas£nisf:ra£iva» .organisation and planning costs 9 incluslieg salaries, for an 

ttive Director and administrative, clerical and secretarial panoses! 
prior to the sat of the first academic period. General Electric will 
p&y such coats as they are d by the Trustees on a tssataly fcasis or 
at such other cises as may fee sutaslly agreed to hy the Trustees and General 
Electric. At the ties at the provisions of graph. FIFTH hereof feecosse 
ope ?e 9 any of these administrative, organisation and planning costs v&ich 

sa fee handled in accords ~t?ith the provisions of paragraph 



.': The Trustees shall render to General Electric periodic state- 
issntG . g forth sditures "aipts covering; fcfea courses conducted 
under* 

E4BIOT: The Trustees ©hall fcaap General Sleetric informed periodically 
as to the sta of those students designated fe^ General Electric 

' are enrolled in the courses. 

.1: It is the intention of the parties that the entire cost of the per- 
forsaanee bf the Trustees oi the tsusta herein specified shall be paid by 
property given 9 transferred or ayed for the trusts I I and the proceeds 
of such property and that no part ol h cost shall fee horse by or gaid r*r< 
eppr< I by the taoetta General Court for the use of the 
.varsity of Massachusetts. 



-J' 



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1 



If at any tism or froa tiese to tisse property hold for the trusts 
harcoi . ill, in the sola opinion of cho X; sceed esBcants currently re- 
id therefor a s^ch c in tha discretion o£ the Trustees be invested 
scy ?-"■' siful linger the provisions, of Section 7 of Chapter 75 aforesaid 
rty so invested and the proceeds thereof shell fes liniatared 
for the trusts sareof. 

EXOTS^H: Ths Tr ! by this indenture may fee terminated by 

Electric ■: i>" ©r the Trisstees agon written notice given to 
the other ess or before January I of say year. Such termination shell be 
effect!-. 30 of euela co! m year. Upon the effective date of the 

Trustees shell ^ind lie aet initios conducted 
srj er : into cash any m inv i fey them in accordance 

sfieh Article eaof and the pre- :• thereof, and distribute the Trust 
property n g ester oil c: as of or incident to the completion of the 
ex. Ls year ended aest prior to such J«ne 30 end scch winding sip, liquida- 
tion and distribution hcv s fallows: 

*• AH " :i personal property , if assy s shall be contributed free of 
est to the Trustees for tbe use of the University of Massachusetts ; 
2. All-ea. i be diatri & free of trust to General Electric end to 

atrifeutor© v&o shall have aada contributions during or on 
eee^uat e : Gcedc^c ; ended is proportional to the 
rasgeefc - » co; 3 | steetrie asid by such other 

contributors 9 if any; and 
3- All other g rty 3 if any* i trlbuted free of trust to. the 
Sn sity of stta. 

•kail 6 gar, and its pro- 

I be construe ; the effect tl daterated in accordance 
th, the Ism of She GteL lalth of ^assachasstts. 






g each of ^blch 

' m , 

l ' 1MB 0COl t® I 

: by it® QfiEieax ; ; Inly eafcheari , osad zka& Board of 

>i . " it© a ss Xnustea ^ ad 

■'■ i xd of fcl ' and »s> 
»r to i 

- : ;< : ". ail bs 

:kis I tfcwts So I?© signed 

by the 

; tlis '■ ■ £h®T$ - 1 fey 

■ 



Revised as of February 1, 195/ 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
1 MASSACHUSETTS FACULTY SENATE 



1. Name . The name of chis organization shall be che University of i 
Lassachusetts Faculty Senace, hereafter referred to in this document as the 2 
Senate. 3 

2. Purpose . The Senate shall be organized to discuss and recommend 4 
policies affecting the University as a whole, in accordance with the provisions 5 
of Article 7 of this Constitution. The Senate shall also strive to promote 
Faculty participation in developing policies and procedures within the various 7 
colleges, schools, divisions, and departments of the University. The adoption 8 
of chis Constitution by the Faculty and its approval by the Board of Trustees > 
shall be considered an organizational act by the Faculty for the purpose of 10 
delegating the study of such policies and procedures co a smaller representa- 11 
cive group called the Senate. Election of the Senate shall as an act dissolve 12 
the former Educational Policies Council of the University. 13 

3. Powers . The Senate derives its powers from Article IX, paragraph 3, 14 
Article XI } paragraph 1, and Article XII of the By-laws of the Board of 15 
Trustees; these articles direct the President and his associates of the Faculty 16 
to organize and suggest as areas for consideration by the Faculty as a body 17 

all important matters of the University its research, instruction, and 18 

welfare and discipline of the students 5 '. The Senate shall have such powers as IS 

may hereafter be delegated to it by the Board of Trustees. The Senate shall 20 

also have power to enact, amend, or repeal by-laws for its internal 21 

functioning. 22 

4. Membership . (a) The following officials of the University shall be 23 
ex officio members of the Senate: President, Provost, Dean of the College of 24 
Arts and Sciences, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Dean of the Graduate 25 
School, Dean of the School of Home Economics, Dean of che School of Business 26 



:€ ' i** 4 



1 



■2- 

Administration, Dean of the School of Education, Dean of the School of I 

Engineering, Dean of the School of Nursing, Director of che Division of 2 

Physical Education, Secretary, Treasurer, Librarian, Dean of Men, Dean of 3 

Women, Registrar, and Alumni Secretary. 4 

(b) All other members of the Senate shall be elected. Elections shall 5 
be held in accordance with Article 5 below, and with the pertinent sections 6 
of che Ey-laws of the Senate. 7 

(c) Only qualified voters, as defined in Article 5 below, who will have 8 
had at least one academic year of service to the University at the time of % 
assuming membership shall be eligible for membership in the Senate, except in 10 
che case of newly created colleges, schools, divisions, or departments, as il 
provided in the By-laws of the Senate, and except for newly assigned pro- 12 
fessors of Military Science and Tactics and Air Science. 13 

(d) The normal term of membership shall be three years. However, in 14 
the first election, one-third of the membership shall be elected for one year, 15 
one-third for two years, and one-third for three years. No elected member 16 
shall succeed himself; after an interval of one year a member of the Faculty 1? 
again becomes eligible for election. The first election shall be held before 18 
che close of the academic year 1>56~57; subsequent regular elections shall be l f > 
held during the month of September. 2C 

(e) An elected member of the Senate who resigns from the Faculty or is 21 
on leave of absence forfeits his membership in the Senate permanently from 22 
the effective date of such resignation or temporarily during the term of 23 
such leave of absence, thus creating a vacancy in the Senate. 24 

(f) By-elections shall be held within one aionch after the beginning of 25 
classes in each regular semester to fill vacancies in the Senate. 26 

(g) The ratio of elected members to ex officio members shall exceed 27 
the ratio of 2 to 1. 28 



i'-. ':#* 






-->• ->■*■> 



15. Ele ctio n Procedure: (a) Regular elections and by-elections of 1 

Senate members shall always be conducted by secret ballot. 2 

(b) All qualified voters shall have an opportunity to vote in every 3 
regular election or by-election. A qualified voter is any full-time Faculty 4 
member who is not in his first regular semester of service to the University 5 
and who is not on leave of absence. 6 

(c) The By-laws may prescribe procedures for making nominations and hold- 7 
ing elections consistent with the provisions of this article. 8 

6. Functions , (a) The Senate shall hold at least one regular meeting 3 

each month during the academic year, beginning in October and ending in May. 10 

(b) Special meetings may be held when appropriate and may be called in 11 
one of the following ways: (1) The President of the University may call a 12 
special meeting; (2) cwenty percent of the membership of the Senate, by 13 
petition to the President of the Senate, may call a special meeting; (3) ten 14- 
percent of the membership of the Faculty may, by petition to the President 15 
of the Senate, call a special meeting. 16 

(c) The President of the University shall be President of the Senate 17 
and shall normally preside at its meetings; in the absence of the President, 18 
or if the President so desires, the Provost shall preside; in the absence of 19 
both the President and the Provost, the Secretary or Acting Secretary of the 20 
Senate shall call the meeting to order and conduct the election of a temporary 21 
presiding officer. 22 

(d) A quorum shall consist of a majority of the ex officio members and 23 
a majority of the elected members. 24 

(e) A Secretary shall be elected by the Senate from the membership of 25 
the Senate each year for a term of one year. He shall publish and distribute 26 
the agenda to the Faculty, shall keep the minutes of the meetings of the Senate , 27 
and shall publish to the Faculty a summary of actions taken. If the Secretary 28 



J 



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1 



4- 

of the Senate is to be absent from a regular or special meeting of the 1 

Senate, he shall delegate a member of the Senate to carry out his duties 2 

during his absence. 3 

(f) The Senate shall require regular reports from its standing com- 4 

mittees and special reports from its ad hoc committees, if any. It shall 5 

also receive, on request, reports from the committees of the Faculty. 6 

? • Relation s among Trustees , President , Senate , and Faculty . '/ 

(a) The Board of Trustees is the final authority on all policies. 3 

(b) The Senate shall be consulted on matters pertaining to educational S 
policy. 10 

(c) The President of the University may ask the Senate to reconsider 11 
its actions. 12 

(d) Any action of the Senate that requires approval by the Board of 13 
Trustees shall be forwarded to the Board of Trustees by the President of uhe 14 
University with his comment thereon, unless the Senate, upon reconsideration 15 
as specified in (c) above, rescinds its action. 16 

(e) The Faculty may overrule an action of the Senate by a majority 1/ 
vote of the Faculty members present and voting at any general Faculty meeting. 18 

(f) The President of the University appoints all committees of the IS 
University Faculty. At least one elected member of the Senate shall be a 20 
member of each committee of the University Faculty. These committees report 21 
to the President of the University and shall report to the Senate on request. 22 

8. Committees of the Senate . (a) The Senate shall establish such 23 

standing committees of the Senate as the By-laws direct, and may create addi- 24 

-ional ad hoc committees. 25 

(b) The President of the Senate shall appoint all members of all 26 
committees of the Senate, subject to ratification by the Senate. 27 

(c) The chairman of each committee of the Senate must come from the 28 



1 



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membership of Che Senate. Membership of committees of the Senate shall 1 

normally come from within the Senate, but may on occasion be comprised of 2 

persons from without the Senate, including students and alumni. 3 

9. Constitutional Amendment Procedure . This Constitution may be 4 

adopted by a majority vote of those present and voting at a general Faculty 5 

meeting; it may be amended by a majority vote of chose present and voting at 6 

a general Faculty meeting, provided that the proposed amendment has been 7 

presented at a previous Faculty meeting. An action to adopt or amend this 8 

Constitution is effective only after it has been approved by the Board of 9 

Trustees. 10 

Suggested BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY SE NATE. 11 

1. By-laws of the Senate may be adopted, amended, or repealed by a 12 
three-fifths vote of those present at a regular or special meeting of the 13 
Senate or by a majority vote of those present at a regular or special meeting 14 
of the Faculty, provided that the proposed change has been presented at a 15 
previous meeting. The vote shall be by written ballot. 16 

2. Meetings of the Senate shall be conducted in parliamentary pro- 17 
cedure in accordance with Robert's Rules of Order (Revised Edition). 18 

3. The Secretary of the Senate shall be elected at the last regular 19 
meeting of the Senate during an academic year and shall assume the duties of 20 
his office at the conclusion of that meeting. 21 

4. An agenda for each regular meeting of the Senate shall be made up 22 
of all items submitted to the Secretary and shall be sent to each member of 23 
che Faculty at least five working days prior to the meeting. The agenda for 24 
each special meeting shall be sent to the Faculty at least two working days 25 
prior to the meeting, and shall include a statement of the authority by which 26 
the special meeting was called. Senators having new business to be placed 27 
upon the agenda shall notify the Secretary of the nature of this business 28 



I 



J 



6- 

at least seven working days before the date of the meeting, but additional 1 

new business not on the agenda may be brought up from the floor after that 2 

on che agenda, or prior to it by a majority vote of the Senate. 3 

5. The standing committees of the Senate shall include a Committee on 4 
Elections and such other committees as the Senate deems necessary for its 5 
operation. Vacancies on standing commitcees shall be filled by appointment & 
during the first thirty calendar days of each semester, or within a month of 7 
cheir occurrence. Appointments shall expire with the member's term of office, 3 
if the member is a senator, or one year from the date of his appointment, if £ 
he is not a senator. 10 

6. The Committee on Elections shall conduct regular elections in 11 
September and by-elections during the first twenty-one days of each regular 12 
semester for those districts in which vacancies are to be filled. Elections 13 
shall be held independently in the several election districts, but che 14 
Committee on Elections must approve the nomination and election procedures 15 
in each district. The Committee on Elections shall also recommend changes 16 
in election districts to the Senate for approval, as necessary, to conform 17 
with the following principles: (a) each college, school, or division, the 18 
departments of Air Science and Military Science, and the members of the pro- 19 
fessional staff above grade 12 who are not assigned to any department shall 20 
constitute one or more election districts; (b) one of the above units 21 
which contains more than 100 qualified voters may be subdivided into election 22 
districts, each of which should contain at least 40 qualified voters: 23 
(c) each department shall be entirely within one election district, and de- 24 
partments or other subdivisions should be grouped in a reasonable manner. 25 

7. The number of members to be elected to the Senate from each district 26 
shall be the nearest whole number to 1/25 the number of full time professional 27 
positions above grade 12 allotted to chat district, plus 1/200 the number of 28 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 2, 1957, 11:00 a.m., Colonial Lounge, Student Union Buildinj 

"^airman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brown, 

Miss Buxton, Casbin, Crowley, Haigis, 
Ta^er, Whitmore, President Mather; 
Provost McCune, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Dr. Boyden reported for the Trustee Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study and on the recommendation of this committee, 
it was 

VOTED: To approve the following sabbatical leaves: 

1. Edwin D. Driver , Assistant Professor of Sociology, 
for one year at half pay for study in India of 
social and cultural factors in mental illness. 

2. G. Stanley Koehler , Associate Professor o* English, 
for the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, for 
research involving study of the relation between 
imagery and myth in the poetry of Milton at 
Widener Library. 

3. Robert P. Lane , Associate Professor of English, for 
the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, for re- 
search and writing on the subject of Gabriel Harvey, 

4. William B. Nutting , Assistant Professor of Zoology., 
for the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, to 
study demodectic mange in Australia. 

5. Israel H. Rose , Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
for the first semester 1957-58 at full salary, for 
research in abstract Algebra and the foundations of 
Geometry. 

6. Jonas Vengris , Assistant Research Professor of 
Agronomy, for the period July 1 to December 31, 1957 
at full salary, for basic research in weed control 
at the University of Wisconsin. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following undergraduate courses 
of study. (see attached list) 



1957 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Edwin D. 
Driver 



G. Stanley 
Koehler 



Robert P. 
Lane 



William B. 
Nutting 



Israel H. 
Rose 



Jonas Vengris 



New 
Courses 



1958 



TRUSTEE 



Gift in 
memory of 
Professor Osmun 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dr. Boyden said that his commit te° had also acted upon 
a new graduate program in Forestry but since the other members of 
the Board had not had opportunity to study this program, he would 
recommend that action be deferred until the next Board meeting. 
He said that the material in support of the program was ex- 
ceptionally well prepared and that he wanted each member of the 
Board to see this material before final action. 

President Mather reported that the General Electric 
Company has given the University several items of equipment as an 
outright gift and has billed the University for certain other 
items at a figure considerably below the usual price. 

He also reported that the University has received Federal 
grant of $375,000 for the construction of medically related 
facilities. Of this amount $175,000 will be used in construction 
of clinical psychology facilities in the Liberal Arts building 
and $200,000 will be used for Zoology facilities in the Science 



Center. 



President Mather also reported gift of a landscape 



painting in oils from Ernest A. Back of Chaplin, Connecticut. 
This presentation to the University is in memory of Professor A. 
Vincent Osmun, former Head of the Department of Botany. The 



Trustees 



VOTED: 



To accept the gift of an oil painting from 
Mr. Ernest A. Back of Chaplin, Connecticut, 
in memory of Professor A. Vincent Osmun 
and requested the Secretary to express 
appreciation of the Board to Mr. Back. 

Name of picture - Oak in Autumn 
By - Bertram Bruestle 



1 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather discussed the appointments procedure of 
the Universit}', especially as it pertains to Chapter 556 of the 
Acts of 1956. He said that the Ey-Laws of the Board require 
Trustee action on all appointments of the grade of Professor or 
above. The By-Laws authorize the President of the University to 
make all appointments below the grade of Professor with ratifica- 
tion of the Board. In the past it has been the custom to send 
the Board lists of appointments and other personnel changes once 
or twice a year. Since the passage of Chapter 556, it is 
necessary that the Board approve in advance all appointments to 
the professional staff at salary rates above minimum and also 
act on the establishment of new positions. With these exceptions 
the President stated that it is necessary for him to proceed with 
the appointment of members of the professional staff and present 
the names to the Board for ratification at the next Board meeting. 
The Trustees agreed that this procedure is necessary and sound. 

On the recommendation of the President and after 

discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve the attached list of appointments, 
promotions and merit increase. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To name Robert B. Parmenter, Extension 

Professor of Forestry Emeritus effective 
April 1, 1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve step-rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with the state schedule as 
earned and payable during the months of 
April and May of 1957. 



1959 



Appointments 



Robert B. 
Parmenter 
Emeritus 



Step-rate 
Increases 



1960 



TRUSTEE 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Lout a 
Crab tree 
fellowships 



Vending 
Machines 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Scholarships and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth scholarships to the 
following members of the class of 1961 and 
to approve the list of alternates in 
priority order in accordance with the 
attached list. 

It was also 

VOTE D r That the Commonwealth scholarships of $250 
each shall be paid in installments of $125 
each semester. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Scholarships and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award five Commonwealth scholarships 
surrendered by five students who have 
withdrawn from college, in accordance 
with the attached list. 

And it was 

VOTED ; To approve the attached list of Commonwealth 
scholarship alternates for the classes of 
1958, 1959 and 1960 with the understanding 
that this list, of alternates replaces previous 
lists of alternates and is in priority order 
by class and by sex. 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council 

and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve award of Lotta Crabtree fellow- 
ships in the amount of £2,000 each for the 
academic year 1957-58 to Mr. Kenneth A, 
Sund, Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry and 
Mr. Harvey R. Levine, Ph.D. candidate in 
Entomology. 

The Trustees discussed recommendation of December 1, 1956 
from the Trustee Committee on Recognized Student Activities rela- 
tive to the use of income from vending machines and agreed to post- 
pone action on this recommendation until the June meeting. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather reported that the amount of $12,000 has 
accumulated in interest from various invested funds of the Hniver- 
sity. This interest money is unrestricted as to use and may be 
allocated at the discretion of the Trustees. He requested 
authorization to use $7,000 of this amount for general scholar- 
ships to be awarded by the University Scholarship Committee. 
After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to use $7,000 

of accumulated interest ^rom invested funds 
of the University for the award of scholar- 
ships by the University Scholarship 
Committee, 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds which met on March 19 in Boston. On the 

recommendation of this committee and after inspection of plans, 

it was 

VOTED : To approve the Master Plan of the campus as 
modified by Mr. Shurcliffe as of March 18, 
1957. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds and after inspection of plans, it was 

VOTED; To approve the location of dormitory #15 in 
the area behind Fernald Hall and at the foot 
of the hill in front of Mills dormitory as 
shown on the revised Master Plan. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds and after inspection of plans, it was 

VOTED : To approve final plans for the Liberal Arts 
Building as prepared by Shepley Bulfinch 
Richardson and Abbott. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds and after inspection of plans, it was 

VOTED: To approve final plans for the Library 
addition as prepared by Ames and Graves. 



1961 



Scholarships 



Master 
Plan 



Dormitory 

#15 



Liberal Arts 
Building 



Goodell 
Library 
addition 



1962 



TRUSTEE 



Maintenance 
Building 



Phi Sigma 

Kappa 

tablet 



Parking 
Area 



Capital 
Outlay 



4 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds , it was 

VOTED : To approve preliminary plans for the 
Maintenance Building as prepared by 
Maloney and Tessier. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Crounds and after inspection of plans, it was 

VOTED : To approve plans for a monument to hold the 
Phi Si^ma Kappa tablet as prepared by T ■-■' 
Larsen Bradley and Hibbard with the under- 
standl*-^ *"hat the monument is to be constructed 
at no cost to the University. 

was 

VOTED ; To approve location of tbr monument to hold 
the Phi Sigma Kappa tablet on the lawn area 
on or near the sits of North College after 
North College is removed. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on fuild- 

ings and Grounds and after discussion, it was 

V OTED : To appoint the firm of Whitman and Howard 

of Boston as consultants to prepare plans and 
specifications for parking lot and other im- 
provements in the vicinity of the Student 
Union Building and the Physics Building. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds , it was 

VOTED: To approve capital outlay projects for the 
fiscal year 1959 in accordance with the 
attached list. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to submit 

capital outlay projects for the fiscal year 
I960, 1961, 1962 and 1963 in a total amount 
of $2S T ££57tfOTj~with the understanding that 
the Trustees reserve the right to alter and 



Qzf23 f f/f /&7 amend these projects from year to year. 



1963 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to question from Trustee. Whitmore, Treasurer 
Johnson said that it does not appear that the Liberal Arts Build- 
ing will be delayed because of inability to obtain 20-inch steam 
pipes. The engineers have worked out a means of substituting 12 
and 8-inch pipes so that the Liberal Arts Building can proceed on 



schedule. 



The Trustees inspected plans for dormitory #15 and' 



VOTED : To approve plans for dormitory #15 as pre- 
pared by Louis W. Ross. 

In the absence of Trustee Brett, Chairman of the 

Committee on Finance, Chairman Bartlett requested Treasurer Johnson 

to report on the Finance Committee meeting of April 16, On the 

recommendation of the Finance. Committee, it was 

VOTED : To bond the Director of the Student Union in 
the amount of $10,000 beyond the general 
coverage for University employees. 

It was 

VOTED : To discontinue the extra $10,000 bond for 
the Business Manager at the termination of 
the present bonding period. 

Also on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it 



was 



VOTED : To authorize the President to expend $700 
from the General Electric Company gift for 
unrestricted purposes. 

Also, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to establish the 

Helen E. Know! ton endowment fund in the amount 
of $15,000 with the income to be used for a 
scholarship or scholarships to deserving women 
students in Home Economics with the understand- 
ing that the principal is to be invested as 
part of the pooled endowment funds of the 
University. 



Liberal 

Arts 

Building 



Dormitory 

#15 



Student 

Union 

Director bonded 



Business 
Manager 



General 

Electric 

Fund 



Helen E. 
Knowlton 
Endowment 
Fund 



1964 



TRUSTEE 



Stock 



Military 
Property 
Bond 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it 

was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sell $15,000 
worth of U. S. Treasury notes 2 f s du-^ 
8/15/57 and to buy $15,000 worth of U. S. 
Government bonds 3%'s. 

Treasurer Johnson said that on April 16 the Finance 
Committee asked him to recommend stock purchases for the invest- 
ment of $17,000 available cash, ^he treasurer has since consulted 
with members of the Finance Committee and with their approval has 
been making certain purchases. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To ratify the following stock purchases 
made by the Treasurer with the approval 
of the Finance Committee: 

200 shares common stock Baltimore Gas & Electric 
200 shares common stock Niagara Mohawk Power 
200 shares common stock Southern Company 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Army ROTC has re- 
quired Trustees to carry bond of $600,000 on military property 
located on the campus. This bond has been at no cost to the 
University. Under changed Army regulations, they are now willing 
to reduce the bond to $120,000 and it was 

VOTED : To approve reduction of the military 
property bond on Army FOTC property 
to $120,000. 

President Mather said that the matter of sale of land 

to fraternities and sororities has been discussed many times by 

the Board. The only item now holding up the sale has been the 

provisions to be included in the deeds. The President suggested 

the following list of recommended provisions to be included in 

the deeds of sale of fraternity and sorority lots. (see attached) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After discuss ion j it was 



1965 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED: That the Trustees offer for sale to sororities 
the four lots as laid out on the Master Plan, 
dated January 2, 1957, located on the north 
side of Eastman Lane and abutting Eastman Lane; 
and that the Trustees offer for sale to 
fraternities the five lots abutting Eastman 
Lane on the south lying between the proposed 
East By-Pass and East Pleasant Street as shown 
on the same Master Plan; the sales price of each 
lot to be determined by appraisal by three com- 
petent persons selected by the University. Each 
deed of sale shall contain the provisions as 
authorized by the Trustees known as "Provisions 
to be Included in the Deeds of Sale of Fraternity 
and Sorority Lots" adopted May 2, 1957, The cost 
of the land survey, appraisal, and preparation 
of the deed and the legal fees and revenue stamps 
in connection with the sale shall be paid by the 
buyer in addition to the price of the lot. 



1 



And it was also 

VOTED : That the "Recommended Provisions to be In- 
cluded in the Deeds of Sale of Fraternity 
and Sorority Lots" dated December 12, 1956 
be adopted and hereafter included in all 
deeds of sale of land to Fraternities or 
Sororities in lieu of any other recapture 
clause with the understanding that the 
attached provisions may be modified in 
accordance with the suggestions of the 
Attorney General made in letter of May 1, 
1957 addressed to Chairman Bartlett. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 




Q <^LXJ^JU 



i*^**sJi£ZlA 



Secretary 



Chairman 



I 



1966 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



CggMSS nii flf ti ggjOPg 



Cfasssg© in gr^difc and eehefe liia^ 

Boeas^ SBt Fresa,. 2 2-&r. laboratories and 2 esttdits 

to» 2 2<*lnr. li&eratories pics &*Ml£i©Eal lafeor@£osry 

hf &s?r«gages©«t o&d 3 erudite, 



Hew j Cea ggea 

91, and 92 e Xftdape&dea& Steady end Sesearefe 

For qmeiiliied senior® g independent sfc®$y cstd roseArch <$n 
selected problcGBS in Beninese Adtai&i0t;ratle&« TOtn ^emission 

of tk$ instreeter sad fc&© Bsen. Credit 1 • 3 



75 Real E$£©£<3 

The essentials ©f real «s<:at« principles aad praetieesg 
b£©k<grage CioeiciuSis^; listing, selling and fins»eis<g)s £ls@ 

eeenes&es @£ erban estate; the fendazasntala or" seel estate 

trjalaatien ©nd tsas^gssssst* 

3 class tasrs Credit 3 



i 



-2- 



(II) Boctrinal Backgrounds of Gontenporacy Theory 
?hie course is designed to review the stodera beginnings of 
contemporary economic analysis* The foundations laid by classical 
theory from Fhysieoeraey through Hill are first investigated. The 
emergence of neeelassieism and its chief nineteenth century variants , 
i.e., the Lausanne, the Austrian and the English, comprise a second 
area o£ study. Finally » certain asong the leading dissenters from 
the Esaia currents, notably £Sars 9 the Serosa historical school, and 
Veblen, are treated. Credit 3 



English 



67. (I) ISedera Continental Drama in Translation 

A study of Continental European drama from Ibsen to the present 
day. Through the study of approximately twenty representative plays, 

the course will present a survey of the sain currents in late nine* 
teenth century and twentieth century European drama. 
Prerequisites: Saglish 1-2, English 25-26. Credit 3 

95. (I) The Sya&olist Tradition in English Poetry 

An intensive study of symbolist elements in the poetry of 
Blake, Coleridge , the Pre-B&phaelites, Hopkins 9 and Yeats and a 
survey of seise of the significant criticise dealing with these 
writers. 
Prerequisites: English 1-2, English 25-26. Credit 3 



72. Geologic Field 

An introduction to the 
field mapping., and their 
selected areas. 
© field hours by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Geology 5§ s Geology 73, or consent 

of instructor. 



and techniques used in 
to the geologic sapping of 



Credit 3 



91. Photogeology 

A laboratory study of the instruments and 
in sashing measurements and preparing base maps and geologic maps 
from vertical &s& oblique aerial photos. 
2 3-hour lab periods 
Prerequisites: Geology 73 Credit 3 



67. Geman Masterpieces in Translation 

A study of German literary aasoaments, rasping from the Middle 
Ages up to the present, from the hay . of .the i Bttelwflfe and Parsival 
to Thomas g&nn's Magic Sfeuntain and $er£ei e s Star of the Pnbora . 
Through lectures en the general baelcgrcund and discussion of texts, 
this course attests to assess Germans literary contribution to 
the Western heritage. fGer&an majors t&o elect this course « will 
be required to read a specified number of tests in the original) • 
Prerequisites : Junior Standing Credit 3 



-a- 



Goyernaaent 

74. Comparative Political Parties aod Politico 

An analysis of the ideology, structure and dynamics of 
diverse types o£ political parties, of electoral systems end 
of party systems in an effort to suggest interrelationship* 
Prerequisites: Goverxsssnt 25 and 26 Credit 3 

33. Public Personnel Administration 

Theory, practice, and organisation of the personnel functions 
in governmental edsiinistration, including recraitsent, testing, 
classification, condensation, promotions, training, and employee 
relations . 
Prerequisites: Government 25, Government 61, or 

permission of instructor Credit 3 

84. Governmental Financial Administration 

Theory, practice, and organization, including budgeting, 
revenues, debt operations, records administration, purchasing* 
audits, and financial reporting. 
Prerequisites: Government 25, Government 61, or 

permission of instructor Credit 3 

91. Scope and Methods o£ Political Science 

Critical csaasisatiea of the scope and unity of political 
science s&& the significant methodological positions and re- 
search techniques. 
Prerequisites: Gevenaesat 25 Credit 3 



53. (X) 54. (II) History of Far Eastern Civilisation 

A general historical introduction to the civilisation and 
contemporary problems of the Far East, The first semester treats 
the traditional civilisation and the early is^act of the Rest. 
The second semester deals ^ith revolutionary developments of the 
twentieth century and the place of the Far Seat in the tsorld 
balance of power. Either semester ssay he elected independently. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

77. (X) Modem Britain 

A study of selected topics on the political, social, and 
intellectual development of Britain in the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 
(Replaces History 71) Credit 3 



Ifailoseghy 

53. (X) The Philosophy of Plato 

A nuH&cr of the later dialogues are reed £er their analysis 
of the s&jor philosophical problems and proposed solutions in 
ethics 9 polities , science, religion, seta-physics, end epietcsfiology. 
Attention is given to the influence of Plato's philosophy in the 
development of certain 20th century philosophies. 
Alternates Tjith Philosophy 54. 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 25 or Philosophy 51 Credit 3 

54. (I) the Bhilosophy of Aristotle 

Selections fress the worfes of Aristotle are studied with a 
vie?? to increased understanding both of the forsalation «hich 
Aristotle geve to leedi^ categories of thought in natural science, 
ethics, aesthetics, psychology, metaphysics* and epiotesEDlogy, 
end of Aristotle's systematic theory in these fields, 
(S3 and 54 replace SI) Credit 3 

Prerequisites : either Philosophy 25 or Philosophy 51 

59. (11) Philosophy in the Age of Enl%hteiaieat 

A study of representative thinners of the Cartesian and 
British ei^lricist traditions is followed by an esas&aatioa of 
the relation between the Kantian approach to ssetaphysles and 
epistesology and these ^ieh characterise these traditions. 
Attention is given to t&e iss^sct of the rise of modern science 
on the development of philosophy during this age. 
(Replaces Philosophy 84) Credit 3 

Prerequisites; Philosophy 25 and permission of 

instructor or Philosophy 52 

61. (1) Ccate^erary Philosophies 

A survey of the intense activity in present «day Asasriean 
assd European thinking as assas^lif led by the great diversity of 
problems, raetheds, and perspectives. Espresentative directions 
of thought to he considered are Katuralisia, Idealism, Esalisa, 
Existentialist, Preset lea, Positivism. Credit 3 

PsereisEiisites: Philosophy 25 and permission of in- 
structor or Philosophy 52 or Philosophy 58 

64. (II) feistential Philosophies 

The ssaia prebleae- peculiar to this flasvansat as a fshole and 

to its main exponents individually (i.e., Bietsscha, Kierkegaard, 
Jaspers, Heidegger, Sartre, Marcel) will be critically e^s&lned* 
Selections from at least three of th& nfflsed thinkers will he read. 
The philosophical baelgrewBd and the significance of the 
existential philosophies will foe considered. Credit 3 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 25 and para&ssion of in- 
structor or Philosophy 51 or Philosophy 52 

©?. (1) Aooricsn Pr^aatise 

A study of the characteristically Asnrican reinterpretations 
of the ©sin strands of Western thought and of uniquely American 
contributions to philosophy. The sources of pragmatism in Haw 
England thought and in the African experience will he explored. 
Intensive study will he made of the sscrk of billies Jesses and 
John Dewey, Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 25 or Hailosephy 51 

or Philosophy 52 



I 






•5- 



37. (I) and 38. (IX) Anstciay and Physiology 

An introduction to human aaatoay and physiology with egphesis 
os the integration of uowaal structure and function, the subject 
satter will include skeletal, nervous, satsenlar, cardiovascular, 
respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, sod reproductive 
systess. Laboratory work will consist of desEenstrations and esperi- 
cents illustrating the principles considered in the lectures. 
Students electing this course should take both 37 and 33. 
2 lectures; 1 3-hour laboratory period 

Prerequisites: Zoology I Credit 3 

37 is prerequisite for 38 



Kew Supa ar Schoo l Courses 

Katheisatics 



S.I. 70 Modern Higher Algebra 

This course is & salification of and abridgement of 
Mathessatica S3 and 54, (153 end 154) . Topics from High School 
Algebra ©ill be studied tree an advanced standpoint. An insight 
into the algebra of isodera mathematics will be given along with a 
discussion of the a&thesatical goals of h2$h school algebra. 

Credit 3 

S. I. 80 Modern Oeosatry 

This course is to be an adaptation of M&thesaatics 51 (151) . 
After introducing the funds&sntel concepts of set, function, 
operation, and relation, it proceeds to an a&ie«atic study of 
geometry. Credit 3 

S.I. 90 tarkshep 

Daring the latter fart of the Institute each participant 

will, in consultation with a ass&er of the staff of the Institute, 
outline a project isMeh is related to the individual's own work 
end to cease aspect of the Institute program. The t$o credits sill 
be earned by ce^>letion of the project and submission of a satis- 
factory written report on it. 

Prerequisite for all above courses: Credit 2 

Admission to the Institute. 



Philosophy 



I 



S 67 Aesrieaa Pragssatiss 

A study of the characteristically African reinterpret afcions 
of the seain strands of western thought and of uniquely American 
contributions to philosophy. The sources of prestations in law 
England thought and in the Aaerican experience will be explored. 
Intensive study will be saade of the works of Willies Jesses and 
John Bewey. Credit 3 



-6- 



I 



I 



Sganisa 

m*i**m*m tit Obi mt* 



$ 87 kctia-Asscric&n Seminar: Secant 8£5asaisa~&aerican literature 

Eepreseutative eodera and eeateaporary witers uill be 
studied as reflecting the seodes sssd prefelcsss e£ life in latin 
j&saerica* These will fee brief lectured; ^ith extensive discussions, 
readings, end reports. & knowledge of Spanish is not required, as 
tbe sutlers will be read in Ba&lish translation ^berever possible. 
Students ts$ao can read Spanish and Portuguese will be urged to read 
the factorial in she original language. 

Credit 3 



P3BS0HBBL ACSX08S 



A ppointaMittta 



1. Br. Hisy 8* Kirsheii, Dean ©f the Sdaool of Bssei&ass Ad- 
ssiraiatratlon, effective Jraly 1, 195? at $11,206 (five steps 
above m±niwss^ par jpear. B*S, »tass& College, M.A. , Hi.©. 
Univorcity of Bleceaein. Cerreatly Head of ©eoartaent of 
Eeenosate And' M&imm Ada&aia&ratlon'at Oalvereity of Mains. 



2, SSr. Itebert H f^ala, Ifesd of DepafetaMOt "A* 9 %rlettlt«gral 

Eogiisseris^!, affective Jaij? 1, 1957 at anneal salary of 
18567. B.S. tiM fro® Mifiai®en'- •State fFniwreity; will 
receive PfbuD. degree fson the aa» tatitsfcioai in Joaa of 
1957. Eagieterad f>refa©{3taal @s$gimar In Illinois, sister 
of varioaa psefeesteaQl keciatiea. 



3. Or. John D. TriMSrj, Bead of fe|3art§3at of Fhyelea, effective 
Sapte^fcar l, 195? 'fit $9,100 par fj?ear (faar step© alsave mlnisssss). 
A.B. BlisabetetaiBi ©allege, M.$* Posnaylvaaia State 9 Sh.O. 

University of Michigan* ©errantly ©a le@<§?0 'of ebeence from 
University of tarns*©®©© and is at the Bend&c Systesss Oivislon 
(classified -veriO at Ana Arbor, Hietstlaan. 



4* iobert 1. Seolaa, Professor "A" (Director of Pittef laid Project) 
effective May 20, 1957 at aaaaal salary of fS 8 ?3& (three stops 
above plniflBw^. B.8. and H.S, Wm York. State Theater® Colle&e* 

Albany. Currently jerking for the !3aval tednaac® Bepartmnt of 
the General Slactrie tetany in Pittef £©ld. (Salary fro® Geearal 
Electric Trast Fend) 

S. Dr. .TlMmse C©f eland, Prafeaeer of Isssiish 9 effective at or near 
the beginning @ ^ fe &® second easeater of the acedeaie year 1957- 

5® at anneal ©alary of |7 a 436 (tue step® above siintan) » A.B. 
©ad Ph.D. fresi tale (hi^k tenors and Shi Beta feppa) has too^tt 
at Cornell, Yale ffid la currently Associate Professor at .the 
University ©£ Chicago. Aet&ors Oar Snissat Friend Ectesnd Bsr&a, 
Yale Press 1950s Cbeek List of Bsarke Letters, 1956 , Cambridge 
University Press; €«Htce of Barlsa Correspondence afoieh trill sua 
to abetat 11 v®hssmi» 



6. Br* John Sa^eg© ^is^;, Professor of Bssio, ©ffaetiT© Septeisiser 1, 
J057 at asmaal ©alagj of |7,74S (thras stapo above adLnlsaaO. 
teJ» Peabrai&e Collar©, Cambridge Uai^arslt^ s Ph.B« Uai^arsity 
of Toroato. ^arrastly ^^lo^ed part tlaia at the oaivaraity of 



~2» 



7. Dr. Stanley F. Satodfca Associate i*ro£essor t? &" (Assistant to 
the- Provost), effective Septeis&er 1, 1937 -at asssaal salary 
/fiyyrt o£- £fi»03C -. 8,8. asi M,S. University of Massacaasefeta, BS.D. 

Perssylvania State University. . Current Iv, fees is acting as 
Assistant to the Provost. 



0. Hiss Berbers R. < Saeisaan, Associate- Professor "A 58 in Base ■ 
2coaosrlcs.» effective Sep&cs&er 1, 1957- at^eaaaai salary o£ 
$6,812. B.S. ffezasLagton State Teachers Cbllcge, M.S. Coraell 

University. Currently teechisss at Cozaell University. 



9* Hiss Harriet J. bright, Associate Professor "A 8 * in Hosae 

Beetsosdcs., e££eetiwa %ril 1» 1957 at ammtal salary of $6,612. 
B.&. FraadLsQluEB State Teachers College, E.S. University of 
Illinois • Currently Food Specialist Eesd*. TecaBical Standards 
Brandy, ds^actaBemt of tbn#* 



,-w. 



sr 



Mr* Paul D. %ar$al, Associate Processor o£ Electrical Ss^iaee? 
iqg-, effective Scptes&cr 1, 1S57 at saneal salary of $7 9 527 
(o&slaiaa) •£ B.S. lis glectvical an4 Mechanical Isgiaaerisi? 
Beaersg Hindu University, M.S. in Electrical E^gtosris^ Illinois 
Institute of ^ec^a.olo0.y.. Carsently Assistant Professor or* 
Electrical Engineering &£ Broal&yn. 



11. Or* Mtol$& H. : faster * SscAciate Professor o£ Botasy, effective 
Soates&er. i, 1957 at $d,435 per year (t^o steps' ^ove xaiaisssa). 

B.S. and M.Se. C&raeH, fh.S, diversity of Minnesota. 

Currently Assistant Processor at t&e- University of MieMgan. 



12* Mr. Paul Befe, Assistant Professor "&"* lfalt®sss s effective 
July 1, 19S? at ssssasl salary of .$5 9 8S9. B.S* i&tgcrs, SS,S. 
University ©£ Slassacbusotts csd ©ill receive Ht.B. degree from 
tfce University ©£ Wisconsin in Jane ©£ 1957. 



m* g&7&& A, €ero, Jr. * Tsroiaiag OS £icer (tasistast Frofessor "4") 
Bureau or" ©sveansiaeafc Research, effective Hay 1, 1957 at Geaaggl 
salary of $5,@$9. B,&. Alfred University and M.A. Pesasylv&nis 
State University. Currently actios director of t&e Institute 
o£ Bublie Service, University of Consecticut. 



14* Ms. 3okn S. $e£fcoa 9 Assistant Professor - M A" of Cranberry Stat lea, 
East Haseasa* effective Js&y 1, 1957 at $7,S£? gar 3?ear Federal 
twa/Ss (si:-: ©taf© a&evc slaleoss). B.S. Petsssylvania State 0a£~ 
versit37, M.S. Louisiana State diversity* Currently Assistant 
Professor at Florida £@rienitnrgl E&peri?saat Station. 



"2* 



15. Karjorie I»* Borthda* University .Editor, effective July 1, 2.957 
at aaas&X salary of $8 9 &74 (safflsisscra) . A.B* Betes College. 
GurreasXy gencreX rejsorter for the Sprisgf laid SJaien. 



16. Hr. FauX A. BsXXeefe* Assistant Professor "A" ©f £grleuX&»raX 
CGsssralca&loas^ effective j&p?lX-X4,> X$57-a& assseel aeXery of 
$5,389. B.S. Boston University. Correatly SiarclsGadisias 
Supervisor* Fesg&X €©.* Xac«, AgaXaad* Mass. 

3.7, Dr. Ssvld Blc&lasoa* Assistant Professor of SSotfessatlcs, 

effective tapftesbeir 1* 1957 at aaacel s&Xary of $6,®06 <£e«r 
stops above .oiielmsia) . B.A. University of Stesver* &*M. CoXtiis&ia 
ua&verslty, 98*9* tfclveral&y of HicMg&s* Currently ca Xcsva 
from PcsissylvsMe State Ifeivcrsity. 



18. Dr. Joha &. SagXe* Ass&steat Professor of €tei£stry 5 effective 
geptosfcer 1. 193? at saaueX saXtsry of $5,070. B*S» University 
of CeXlforaia (Berkeley) aa4 tsiXX receive Hi.B. decree frost the 
State College, of Ws&a&stcn la Joae of 2.957. 



19* Sf&ry G. BertXe&t, Instructor "A" la Saisy aa& Aa&saX Seleacs, 
effective l€sy X9, 1957 at asaosX salary of $5-364 (esse step 
above Mifeuti), B*jB. BgisasyXvoaia State, !£•&• €&sMas&toa State 
College. Currently s^leyed ct the University of ^assac&asetts 
aa&tr Sire Evelfcietiea Ifcsad. 



20. Joaa J» 'CeugbXia, Jr. 5 Xastracto? M A M la 4gricaXtaraX Cossssalc; 

t£#as» effective J^se X6» 1957 at ossstsl salary of $5 8 0?0.. 
B.BfA. S&ode XsXsad School of Bsslsa. PreseatXy at the g&ede 
Xslead Sc&ogX cf Ifesiga. 



2i* <&e©,-Tee& £ea a Instructor "A" la Food Tecliaolegy C@ac«kalf tis&) 
effective Hereh X7 S X957 at aanuaX salary o£ $5*070. B..S. 
Sstleasl University of te%$j s Chlaa. 

22. Dr* Sotssrd E* BigeXes?, Instructor la Setasy 9 effective Septesfce* 1, 
XS57 at ami&sl ssXsry of $&,31e. A. 8. and" A.SL OberXla CoXXcge* 
2a%D. University of MicM.gea, (fcsrestly Attache- de lecherc&e 

at the Ualveratty of fcstreal. 

23. Mrs. EsXea 3. Bre&a, Xasfcsactor is M&tltemeties (3/4 t£s@) 
effective Febrcery 27 * 195? at aasaaX salary of $4 9 3X6. A, 8. 

and A. St. University of Kk&ljgsia. 



I 



I 



Press^t longs 



«*4"* 



24* Mrs* Alice H. Epstein, Instructor in Sgathesaties (one-half 

tlsus) effective March 5, 1957 at enmtal salasy of $4,316. 
B.S. Hew Jersey e©lleg© for Weasen, M.S. University of Wisconsin. 
This is a tenperery «rran®enent daring the illness of another 
Instructor <> 



25* Mr. Richard Gregg, Instructor in tosanee Utt^gaaoea* (one-half 

tiws) effective 8e$tes&er 1, 1957 at animal salary of $4,524 (see 
step Above wL&issm} • A.B,, H.A, Harvard sad is dee to receive 
hl» Ph.D„ from Csieahia within tee carreofc year. Currently werk- 
ing en hi@ thesis oases & Ford Foundation Fellewsbip. 



?lr. Vincent Xlardi, Instructor in History j, effective September 1, 

1957 et enseal salary of $4,524 (one ©t@p above sainissat), a .A., 
Butters University , M.Ao Harvard University. Currently 
Instructor at Cemsg&© Tech. 



J?.?* !hfo Ea<i tfeyerstein, Xastseesos of teaanse ta*|js§a$es, effective 
Sept@ssber 1 9 1957 at easoeal salary of $4,732 (too steps above 
isi«ifgs^= Mo Ac «&4 fist. P. University of Hicfeigsa* Garrently 
teaching at the University of leches fcer. 



1, Mr., Willisra 1. Tomtins^a, Jr. fresa Associate Professor "A" to 
Professor "A" GEaabgrry Ss&t&sn, Seat taratae, effective 
Mey 19, 1957 at aaasal salary of $8,: 



2o Eobert L. Ticfenas ire® Assistant Professor "A" to Associate 
Professor "A" im lm^B%8&® Asehitee&osa at . fgnltaaB Fiel«S 
Statian s eff active Jtely I, 1957 at anassal salary of $7«124 ! - 



3 U !3rc X«»wreace C. Bactsaaaak fr©» Assistant Processor t® Associate 
Professor of Besinsss - AaMniatsotlea, effective March 31, 1957 
at ansae! salary of $5,4 



I 



4. Bsrsehel G. Abbott, fsas Instmetor "A" to Assistant Professor 

"A" in Forestry , ef festive Jssly 1, 1957 at annual salary of 
$6,162. 

* Teaching Session bet assignee 4 to this dspertesnt. 



-5- 



I 



5, Gordon 8. Fellow fro© Instructor "A" to Assistant Professor 
"A" la Veterinary $cisnc4 at tialtban field Station, effective 
May 19, 1957 at osuwsl salary of $6,70®. 



$. Sana P. Snyder £roa Instructor to Assistant Professor 

Zoology, effective Jara&ary 27, 1957 at anssasl salary of |3,070< 



Merit Xncreaso 



1. Dr, Harold L- Seith, Jr., Instructor In 

salary increase fro® $4,316 to $4,732 (two ©taps) effective 
Sa^tcs&er 1, 1957. Br» Smitb bas ©enras ytaers of teaching 
experience at latgers, Rlscenain, and Eates and is new teach- 
ing adv&need work and farfensing brilliantly. He will bo 
plaoad its ek&rfge of intargBsdi&t© vork in French £or certain 
sassssnts of tha Csraegia lAngoesa Projeet. 



Snsritas 



1. It is 

Extension 



that Professor %„ B, Parasater bo nsgggd 
Professor o£ Forestry Sresrittss effective April 1, 1957. 



Bacomsnda tien ftaa Coeaitt&a on SacogBiaod Studact. Activities , Beessiber I . 1956 

VOQD: To racosoand that tha Trustees authorise tbe follow- 
ing distribution of aosssioolons fares vending machines 

located in dormitories: 

^© t he Boraito ry goeial Fmnd 

(adainie tared thrc«g& tbe ESO ccsssilt©©.) 

5% of first |1@,000 of sat profits freta cesaissions 

SX of nest $?,&00 of sat profits fro® commissions 
10% on all not profits ©var $17,000 £r«® commissions 

The balance to acerae to tho University Athletic Conncil 
for tfes ptar^os© of scholarship aid. 



-6- 



i ^ n nri m i 1 1 r rn i 



*• BAyjiQ . Py_jte:?>yoy , Assistant Pro&tsss? of Saeioiagy, £or oua 
S?ear at kail: pay for stadfer 4a Icila of ueclal a&d cultural 

£ actors in saatcl lllseas. 

2. 0* Sta&lotfJ&oaklas'* Assselata frofessor of Es?g;Ii6li 9 for tbe 
eecorai sQsestor 1957*58 at fall salary, for rasosarcSi Itwolviag 
geady ait tha relation '&s£^Qen issagery as&& s^rt& in the poetry 
of 24il£on at ili^s&ar Library. 

■ **• BS*£££J|&JfcSS2.> Associate- trofeasor of Esgltsk, gar tho seaoad 
sesastar 1957*56 at Stall salary, for rasearela assd witis^ eia 
tbe eobj«et of Gabriel Barney. 

4. Willlaa B. fkattifss, Assists&t frof&sscr of Zmlzmy, far tha 

eaeaaa saessfcor I937-5S at fall salary, to study domadeetic 



5. X©raal B, Eos©, Associate Professor eg SlafebsBaties, £sr tfeo 
first samaster lt57*S8 at full salary, for research in 
abstract Algafora aad tike foaadatioES of Gaosa try. 

a. Jagae^Vgipr&s, Assistant Eesaarck Professor o£ Agrctsoay, £ar 
tisa period July 1 to ©aeos^er 31 » if 57 at full salary, for 
besie reeearek im rasd control at fcfee Caiversity of Ifiocoaeis. 



aug** i^wi'i»nwaa— cjwr*jgrL~T 



It is raeo®jsa&$o4 that Lotta Crsbtroe FollGHBnljro ia tba 
a&assst of $2,000 bo awarded far ths> aaa4asic year 1957-58 to 
SSs-. Ssnaatb A. Sasbd, Etu S. co&didato £se Chassis try aad Ms?. Barvsy a. 
Leviaa-, Itu'D* ca»di4afc© in EtafcQEsalcgy. 



T© approve step-rat© lacrosses for Essbers of tba pro- 
fe3aiesal staff of tba Ustversity is aceor&aace with tfee ssase 
sebedsla as saraee* aed payable durisig t&a sqbs&s of A^ril asd Hay 
o£ 1957. 



i 



I I I 



» 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 
SELECTION PBD€ESS — 1957 



Following is a summary of family background of the 25 
candidates being recomendecU 

A* Parental status 

Living with parent© 14. 

Orphan 1 

Living with widowed author 7 

Living with divorced or separated mother 3 

B* Average mmber of dependent children $®v family - 3 
C. Average family income (1956) - $3093 



D» Car 

10 famines - no car 

15 families own oars - average age is 1950 model 

All 25 have uaade outstanding scholastic records in high school « 



1 



1. Calassjso, Matilda H. 

2* Farmer, Frances J. 

3* Flieop, Miranda 

4. Johnson^, Nancy G* 

5* Wells, Linda 

6. Flanders, Nancy M* 

?• Lsisborghini* Janet B» 

d« Mc?illlaias, Jeannette B, 

9. Bice, Dorothy £• 

10. Ledger, Constance M« 



1 



Ho 

JLCo 

13. 

15 • 
16. 
17. 
3B. 

19. 

SO* 



Landry, Marie S* 
Deedy, Catherine E« 
Archamb&ult, Leona A* 
Morrison, 2tay G. 
Bailey, Dorothy 
Shepherd, Freda £• 
Llebman, Lois A» 
Pusnlak, Elisabeth M» 
Coulston, Gwendolyn E« 
Aleeio, Jean A. 



JPffifflWH 


jnSnaaf&3>iS» 


MMM 


Srerett 


Middlesex 


Undecided 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


Business Adza 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


Education 


North Attlefooro 


Bristol 


Education 


CujMiington 


Hampshire 


Education 


Lowell 


Middlesex 


Government 


Plymouth 


Plymouth 


Science 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


English 


Willlamstoun 


Berkshire 


Hurslng 


Springfield 


Hampden 


Bacteriology 


Mil® 






WestfieXd 


Hampden 


Cheaaistry 


Vestfield 


Hampden 


Chemistry 


Haverhill 


Essex 


M&thesaatles 


Beverly 


Essex 


Finance 


Boston 


Suffolk 


MatheiEatics 


Warren 


Worcester 


Education 


Mattapan 


Suffolk 


Undecided 


Methuen 


Essex 


Bacteriology 


Hoxb«ry 


Suffolk 


Undecided 


Horth Ablngton 


Plymouth 


Medical Tech 



CLASS OF 19.61 - MEM -Mm#IMDKD FOR CaMMQiOTALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



mm 


i&B 


couro 

*ft«T«l4Mfrl*iMfiMM 


MAJOR 


i. 


Sheinker, Abraham A. 


Chelsea 


Suffolk 


Mecth. Engineering 


2. 


Gilgut, Jr. Thomas J. 


Athol 


Worcester 


Engineering 


3. 


Henneberry, Robert M« 


Salem 


Essex 


Biology 


4. 


Larson, William F. 


Brockton 


Plymouth 


Business Admin. 


5. 


Flaherty, Morgan P. 


Sprlsgfleld 


Hampden 


Physics 


6. 


Mohan, Jr. James J. 


Milford 


Worcester 


Engineering 


7. 


Mart sen, Frederick ¥. 


Barre 


Worcester 


Engineering 


© it 


Getchell, Charles L. 


Merrimac 


Essex 


Undecided 


9. 


Elvander, Robert G. 


East Sandwich 


Barnstable 


Undecided 


10 


Lambert, Eugene H. 


Lawrence 


Essex 


Sagineering 


11. 


AugstkaXns, Valdis A. 


North Adams 


Berkshire 


Cham. Engineering 


j 


Chaples, Jr. Ernest A. 


Palmer 


Hampden 


Undecided 


13. 


Lesieur, Thomas A« 


Holyoke 


Hampden 


Engfjjeering 


u. 


Lanzen, William D. 


Pittsfield 


Berkshire 


KLec* Engineering 


15. 


Fisch, Bobert E« 


Chelsea 


suff oik 


Undecided 


16. 


Rotma% JosMi 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


History 


17. 


Poultney, Bonald E. 


Leominster 


Worcester 


Mathematics 


IS. 


Shannon, Gerard 0* 


ScmerviXle 


Middlesex: 


History 


19. 


Forand, F. Bernard 


Auburn 


Worcester 


Engineering 


20. 


Bavey, Arthur L. 


Southhrlclge 


Worcester 


Physics 


21. 


Binney, William H. 


Wrenth&a 


Norfolk 


KLee* Engineering 


22. 


Nealon, David C. 


Vatartovn 


Middlesex 


Chemistry 











Page - 2. 




CLASS OP 1361 - «L 


- RECOMMENDED FOR 


COMMONWEALTH Si 
COffflff 


JHOUBSHIPS 


1 


£ 


HOE© TOWN 


MAJOR 


1 


. Kaplan s David 


Boa&ury 


Suffolk 


Civil Engineering 


H 


. Peppa, Hicfcard H. 


East Bridgewater 


Plymouth 


Political Science 


25 


. MacouX, Kenneth L« 


Lawenca 


Essex 


Engineering 


26 


» Borden, Bobex"t C. 


Westport Harbor 


Bristol 


Physics 


27 


. Undahlj, Clifford B* 


West Yarmouth 


Barnstable 


Civil Engineering 


28 


. Creane, James B* 


Holyoke 


Hampden 


Philosophy 


29 


» Brand* Stuart H* 


Lowell 


Middlesex 


Engineering 


30 


» Lesion, Jr« Edward ¥» 


Hanson 


Plymouth 


Liberal Arts 


31 


, BousseaUy Robert ¥• 


iimesbury 


Essex 


Business Admin, 


32 


, Pottala, Erik W. 


Fitchburg 


Worcester 


Undecided 


33- 


, Lanousj Allen L. 


North Adaaas 


Berkshire 


Mech. Engineering 


1 


, Connors, Kenneth J* 


Quincy 


Norfolk 


Undecided 


J 


i Alderman, Arnold I« 


Villiaffietown 


Berkshire 


Elee* Engineering 


36 


. Hanson, David M. 


East Longoeadov 


Hampden 


Engineering 


37, 


► Johanson, Gust&ve A« 


Worcester 


Worcester 


Business Admin. 


38, 


, Srouillst, Alfred 0* 


Fhillipston 


Worcester 


Engineering 


39< 


> Fula, Peter Po 


»South Hadley 


Hampshire 


Chemistry 


40 


. MoGrath, Jr. William J. 


Medford 


Middlesex 


English 



I 



BEOOMMENDED COMMON WBALTII EEPLACBMJMS 



jirke, Jamas F„, Jr« 
5huaway» MarceULa A« 
Alfs.no j Lucia M« 
.Zarlengo, Felix J* 
Sethares, James C« 



_T0 1PUCE 



ifrtWftwaqn»w»jw%*vii'ci<MOKCT^ig%i»afaci- , tT^^ 



CLASS TOWH 



(Groebe, Henry IU) 1958 Northaapton 

(Jenkins,, Axnett H.) 19:59 Deerflald 

(Tatham, Barbara U) 1958 Agawan 

(i4sB.is.tiSj Arthur G») 1959 Chleopee 

(Andrews, £l»ore L«) 1959 sfyaanls 






::,.:",-':. 



Hampshire Chemistry 

Franklin Sociology 

Hampden Bacteriology 
Hampden 



Barnstable Elee« Engin* 






Xulpinski, John S* 
Donoghua 3 John T* 
White, Claire H* 
McCue* Brian E« 
jParley, Nova L* 
rsh, George 8* 
taaans, F» Judith 
Hadowics* Jeanette A« 
Lack* Joan R» 
Pleeitelll^ Lucia A* 
Connolly, Patricia A, 
Ssith, ^ieila A* 
O'Neill, William B* 
Levensuk^ George F« 
Anderson, Robert ¥* 
Britt, Bernard J* 
Weeks, fioger V* 



I960 S&nvers 

I960 Dracut 

I960 Northbridge 

19 58 Rockland 

19.58 Halifax 

1958 Sunderland 



1958 Everett 



1959 Brockton 
1959 Leominster 



I960 
1960 



1959 Amherst 



>8%ffl 



1958 West Springfield Hampden Elec* Engin* 

Chemistry 
English, 
EleCe Engin* 
Liberal. Arts 
Business Ad* 
Education 



Hampden 

Esseac 

Middlesex 

"Worcester 



Franklin Bacteriology 



\hr&BB%er Education 



Norfolk 



franklin 



Engineering 
Cheou Engin« 
Liberal Arts 



Hampshire Accounting 



Slland, Claire F* 



1959 Whitinsville 



Worcester Education 



I 



March 18, 1957 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
For the Fiscal Years 1959 - 1963 



1959 



1. Science Center - Third Section, including 

furnishings and equipment and working 
drawings for fourth section 

2. Infirmary, including furnishings and equipment 

3. Engineering & Physics Shops, including 

furnishings and equipment 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory, including equipment 

5. Addition to Dining Commons, including 

furnishings and equipment 

6. Physical Education Building for Men, 

including furnishings, equipment and 
site improvements 

7. Plans for Natural Resources Building 

8. Poultry Plant Laboratories & Buildings 



Total 



$1 


,500, 


,000 


1 


,040 : 


,000 




800 , 


,000 




375, 


,000 




360 : 


,000 


2 


,500 ; 


,000 




55, 


,000 




250., 


,000 


$6 : 


,880, 


,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 



I 



1960 



I 



1. Science Center, including furnishings & equipment 

2. Natural Resources Building, including furnishings, equip- 

ment and site improvements 

3. Addition to Power Plant, including boiler, and utility 

distribution systems and facilities 

4. Plans for Addition to Food Technology Building 

5. Plans for Addition to Physics Building 

6. Classrooms and Offices, School of Business Administration, 

including furnishings and equipment 

7. Plans for Animal Science Building 

8. Plans for Engineering Building 

9. Service Building for Experiment Station 

10. Plans for Administration Building 

11. Building for Experiment Station - East Warehara, 

including furnishings and equipment 

12. Renovate Laboratories - Flint Building, including equipment 

13. Physical Education Fields, including drainage, grading, 

and seeding 

14. Warehouse and Garage for Plant 



Total 



1961 



1. Addition to Food Technology Building, including 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Addition to Physics Building, including furnishings 

and equipment 

3. Animal Science Building, including furnishings & equipment 

4. Engineering Building, including furnishings and equipment 

5. Administration Building, including furnishings & equipment 

6. Plans for Assembly Hall and Field House 



$1,500,000 
1,000,000 

750,000 

50,000 

100,000 

1,200,000 

100,000 
75,000 

100,000 
75,000 

200,000 

40,000 
200,000 

200,000 
$5,590,000 

$ 900,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

1,500,000 

1,500,000 

100,000 



Total 



$8,000,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 3 

1962 

1. Assembly Hall and Field House, including $3,000,000 

furnishings, equipment, and site 
development 

2. Plant Science Building, including greenhouses, 1,650,000 

furnishings, equipment, and site development 

3. Addition to Utility Distribution System 500,000 

4. Coal Storage Facilities, including railsiding, SOO^OC 

equipment and equipment building 

5. Plans for Dining Commons 75,000 

6. Classroom Building, including furnishings and 1,000,000 

equipment 

7. Plans for Farm Buildings 100,000 

8. Plans for Auditorium 150,000 



1963 



Total $6/6*5,000 



1. Dining Commons, including furnishings and $1,500,000 

equipment 

2. Farm Buildings Replacements 3,000,000 

3. Auditorium - Music, TV, Radio, Drama and Art Center 3,000,000 



Total $7,500,000 



TOTAL -- FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM $34 , 645., 00.0 



December 12, 1936 



Rec ©amended Provisions to be Included in the Deeds 
of Sale of Fraternity and Sorority Lots 



The conveyance is subject to the following restrictions: 
1. That Grantee will not sell or otherwise dispose of the premises 
herein conveyed or any part thereof unless the Grantee shall have first 

received an acceptable bona fide offer for the purchase or other disposition 
of the premises 8 and shall have notified the Grantor in writing of the names 
of the party or parties soaking the same and the price , terms and conditions 
thereof; and Grantee agrees that the Grantor shall thereupon have the prior 
right to purchase the premises at the same price and upon the same terms and 
conditions as are contained in sucH offer , This right may be exercised any 
time within sixty days of receipt of notice of said offer by the Grantor* 
If the Grantor fails to exereise said right 'and the Grantee for any reason 
fails to sell or otherwise dispose of the premises in accordance filth said 
offer 8 this right shall not terminate but shall apply t© any future offer 
received by the Grantee » 

2 Any mortgage which may be placed upon the premises shall contain a 
stipulation that the Mortgagee agrees for himself , his heirs , executors,, 
administrators , successors or assigns to assign said mortgage to ttm 'togt&es 
of the University of Massachusetts upon request by them and upon the payment 
to the Mortgagee of the amount outstanding on said mortgage including principal, 
interests penalties, and any other addition to the principal of said mortgage 
which are lawfully due to the Mortgagee. 

3o The conveyed pr@mis®s shall be used exclusively for fraternity a&d/or 
sorority purposes., 

4 The csnvey^d' premises shall not be subdivided without the prior 
approval of the Trustees of the University of Massaehusett ' 



5o No building shall be erected on ©aid premises except that is 
be of £lrst~cless construction and that its plans and design shall have first 

been approved by the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts or whomever 
the Trustees may designate » 

60 All site plans m& developments on the land shall be approved 

by the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts or whomever the Trustees 
may designate <> 

7o The premises shall not be used by or conveyed to any individual, 
organization, or group that adheres to or practice* discrimination in violation 

of any of the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or of the United Btmtaa 
of itorica<> 

So The Grantee convenants to maintain the property in goo-i 
condition at all times to the satisfaction of the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts and/or their designated representatives and that should &hm$ 
fail to do so the University may, at their option, enter upon the premises 
to repair, etc a ®&id property at the full expense of the Grentee 

9o The Trustees of the University of Massachusetts and/or their 
designated representatives may enter upon the premises at any time to inspect 
the premises for any and all conditions that would constitute a hazard, nuisance, 
or viol. ©ties of this eonvenant and to require that the Grantee take corrective 
action to eliminate said condition a 

10 All utilities and services to the property shall be installed 
and maintained in a manner prescribed by the Trustees of the University or 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 1, 1957, 10:30 a.m., Student Union Building, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boutin, Boyden, 
Brett, Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, 
Crowley, Desmond, Haigis, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

After discussion and on recommendation of the President, 



it was 



I 



I 



VOTED : To approve the following personnel actions: 

Appointments Above Minimum 

Promotion to Grade of Professor 

Merit Increase 

Change in Terms of Appointment 

Change in Time of Sabbatical Leave 

Appointments and Promotions 

Step-Rate Increases 

Summer Session 

Other Summer employment 



In accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty, 



it was 



VOTED : To award the following degrees to the candi- 
dates listed on the attached Commencement 
program for June 1957: 

College of Arts and Science 
239 Bachelor of Arts 
108 Bachelor of Science 

College of Agriculture 

64 Bachelor of Science 

School of Business Administration 

130 Bachelor of Business Administration 

School of Engineering 

16 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
24 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
36 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
31 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

School of Home Economics 

39 Bachelor of Science 



1967 



Personnel 
Actions 



Degrees 



1968 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Division of Physical Education 
16 Bachelor of Science 



Total - 703 



Military 

Science 

credit 



Master of 
Science in 
Forestry 



In accordance with the recommendation of the faculty of 

the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED ; To award the following degrees to the candi- 
dates as listed on the attached Commencement 
program for June 1957: 

2 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
2 Master of Landscape Architecture 

7 Master of Arts 

2 Master of Arts in Teaching 
40 Master of Science 
6 Master of Business Administration 
4 Master of Science in Civil Engineering 
1 Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

8 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 72 

Grand Total - 775 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the University 

and of the President, it was 

VOTED : That students in basic military science 

and basic air science receive one semester 
hour of credit each semester for these 
courses; that the grades in these courses 
be used in computing quality point averages 
the same as for other academic courses; 
that the basic military science and basic 
air science courses be carried by students 
in addition to the regular academic program 
prescribed by the several schools and de- 
partments of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Department of Forestry to 
present courses leading to the Master of 
Science degree and specifically to approve 
the following new graduate courses: 

200 Special Problems. Selected research problems in 
Forestry not related to the candidate's thesis. 

Credit, 3 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



201 Advanced Forest Soils. The relation of soils to 
tree growth and other environmental factors with 
particular emphasis on research methods, site 
evaluation, water relationships, and fertility; 
laboratory and field exercises. 

Credit, 

202 Aerial Photo-Interpretation. Advanced aerial 
photo-interpretation emphasizing the analysis of 
natural vegetation, especially forest vegetation; 
a wide selection of aerial photographs are avail- 
able for interpretive study and cartography. Pre- 
requisite, Forestry 171 or equivalent. 

Credit, 

203 Advanced Forest Ecology. Forest environment, 
how it may be altered, and the effect of such 
alteration upon forest establishment and development 
Prerequisite, Forestry 153 or equivalent. 

Credit, 



300 Thesis, Master's Degree. 



Credit, 6-10 



I 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to consult with 
the Attorney General to see what steps may 
be taken to prevent the road through the 
University's property at the Wareham Cran- 
berry Station from becoming a public way. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to employ Walter 
E. Rowley, Civil Engineer of West Wareham, 
to make complete survey of the University's 
property at Wareham at cost not to exceed 
$500. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds , it was 

VOTED : To authorize the employment of the following 
persons to appraise the lots to be offered 
for sale to fraternities and sororities: 

B. 0. Moody, Vice President, First National 

Bank of Amherst 
Robert D. Hawley, Selectman of Amherst 
John Footit, Insurance Agent of Amherst 



1969 



Cranberry 
Station 



Appraisers 



1970 



TRUSTEE 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 



Cranberry 
Station 



Student Union 
Building 



Van Meter 
Dormitory 



Machmer 
Hall 



Flint 
Laboratory 



Wilder 
Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to employ a 
surveyor to make complete survey of the 
lots to be offered for sale to fraterni- 
ties and sororities. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the erection of a shop and green- 
house with Federal Funds at the Cranberry 
Station in Wareham at an estimated cost of 
$19,000 in accordance with sketches pre- 
sented to the committee. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds , it was 

VOTED : To accept the following projects as com- 
pleted: 

1. The Student Union Building built by the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Association. 

2. The addition to Van Meter Dormitory 
(dormitory #14) built by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Association. 

3. The Finish Grading & Seeding of Machmer 
Hall (Mass. State Project No. U-701, con- 
tract #2) as completed by Osley Construction 
Company on May 8, 1957. 

4. Renovations to Flint Laboratory (Mass. 
State Project No. U-502, contract #5) 
as completed by M. Solimando on May 22, 
1957, subject to approval by the 
Treasurer of minor corrections in the 
work. 

5. Renovation to Wilder Hall ( Mass. State 
Project No. U-402, contract #4) as com- 
pleted by D. A. Sullivan and Sons on 
May 15, 1957. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



6. The Thayer Building (large animal building) 
as completed by D. A. Sullivan and Sons on 
May 17, 1957. 

7. Service Transformers (Mass. State Project 
No. U-702, contract #3) by the Collins 
Electric Company on February 5, 1957. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 




cretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



1971 



Thayer 
Building 



Service 
Transformers 



1972 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. 



KBWWimmS ABOVE MIKK4UH 

Br. Alfonso Go Aspeitia, Instructor in Mat&essatlcs, effective 
Septesal>er 1, 195? st $5356 per year (5 steps above sainisass) 
H.S. aaa Ph.D. University of Madrid. Currently gesearca 
Associate at Applied Matfesstatie© Cepartae&at of Bretm- University. 

My B Robert V. Miller, Instructor in Psychology, effective 
Septes&er 1, 1957 at $4732 per year <2 steps above sgaiaisssa) . 
B.S. University of Kansas; K.Ed 3 , £2, A. University of Illinois. 
Bopea to cesgi&ete requ&raaeate for Fn„l>,> in February of 1958. 

earreatly contacting regular coarse in Child ftevelopefiat at the 
University of Illinois* 

Hr. Albert S3.. Craig, Xeecraeter in History, effective 
Septssber 1* 1957 at $4940 per year (3 steps ^beva sdnissssa), 
B.S. Elerttatatem University* Estpect© to receive Eh.D. from 
Harvard University in January ei; 195®. Currently is in Japan 
on a Harvard Yen«€fo£;ag lastitssSa Traveling' FeilosssaiOo 

Mr. ' Prederiek Daialo, Instructor in Civil Sagglaeerlng, effective 
Septes&er 1, 1957 at $4732 {2 etape above ssinissnBsi) » B,S. in 
Civil Engineering. Carreafcly sorting for M.S. in Civil Engineer* 

is^ at the University q2 SiassaeausettSo 

2$lss Pilar Bagalade, Instructor in Spanish, effective Septesaber I, 
1957 at $4524 per year (1 stag* above ata&sass$« &*B. Siasons; 
M.A„ tale ana is now' tserStlng on her doetoret®. s&e td.il be paid 



Br. Blsar tarson, Assistant Professor of Education, effective 
Sspte&ber I, 1957 at $5304 par year CI ©top above. mlnhmss^o 
<Sh*D. University of Sor&a Caroline. Currently teacher of 
History of Esteetioa at Seat Carolina College. 

Dr« Vincent Rogers, Assistant Profeaeor of Education, effective 

Sapte^ar 1, 1957 at $6006 (4 steps above asinis&SBa) 9 Fk i3 D« Syracuse 
University* Currently Assistant Professor at Syracuse University. 



2. 



I 



PBOHOTIOH TO CRAPE OF PROFESSOR 

J. Barry Rich, Department of Forestry from Associate Professor 
to Professor "A", effective September 1, 195? at anssual salary 
of $9100. 



MERIT IBCBBASB 



Or. John Gillespie , Director of Bureau of Govers&ent Research, 
effective September 1, 1957, from $8008 to $8736 (4th step 
above minimum). 



I 



CH&SSB IB TEEMS OF APPOI^Tt^MT 

On May 2, 1957 the Trustees voted to appoint Dr. Thomas Ccpeland 
as Professor of English effective «ith the beginning of the 
second semester of the nest academic year. It is recommended 
that this appointment be effective September 1, 1957; that 
Dr. Copeland be placed on leave without pay from September 1, 1957 
through January 31 » 195S; and that Dr. Copeland be placed on the 
payroll February 1, 1958 as Professor of English at annual salary 
of $7436 (2 steps above sainisaus). 



CB&KBB W TXESB OP SABBATICAL l&Sm 

On Hay 2, 1957 the Trustees approved sabbatical leave for 
Dr. Israel H. Rose, Associate Professor of Mathematics for 
the first semester of the academic year 1957«5§. It is re* 
quested that this authorization be changed so that Dr. Eose's 
sabbatical leave be authorized for the second semester of the 
academic year 1957-53. 



I 



APgQXCTlKfffS A3SP gRQ830riQ33S 
>ointfsents 



Br* &. H, Kyler, Assistant Professor of Bus loess Administration, 
effective Septeafcer 1, 1957 at $5070 par year. 

Mr. Stanley M. Bercfeen, Instructor in Civil Engineering, 
effective September l» 1957 at $431$ per year* 

Mrs. Eutfa C» Boiceurt, Instructor in Eoasa Economics (one-half 
tiae), effective Septcs&er X, 1957 at $215S per year. 

Mr. David Beothby, Instructor in Mathenaties (one-third tine)' 
effective Septeaber I* 1957 at $1433 per year. 

Mrs. Mar j oris Cook, Instructor in Mathematics (one-third tiaee) 
effective Septeaber I, 1957 at $1439 per year. 

Mr. ISarcel B&neau, Instructor "A" in %rieultural Economies 
(one-half ttae) , effective June Z s 1957 at $2535 per year. 

Kr Donald T« Liden, Instructor M A n in Miry and A&l&al Science 
(one-half tisee) effective July X 5 1957 at $2535 per year. 



Promotions 



Hr. Eliot Co Roberts £ro& Assistant Professor M A" agronoay 

to Associate Professor "4" Agronomy effective May 19, 1957 
at annual st&nxf of $6812 per year. 

Mr, Edward A. Buck from Foods Manager of Student Union Build- 
ing to Esacutlv® &s&isfcant to the Director effective July 1» 
1957 at annual salary of $6435 (2 steps above aiaiaua) fro© 
Student Union Funds . 



6XSP-KAXS I^CEEaSSS 



To approve step-rate increases for ses&ers of the professional 
staff of the University in accordance with the state schedule 
as earned and payable during the sosnths of June and July of 
1957. 



UMIVEBSX2Y OF HASSACHOSOTS 



S1MSE& SCHOOL W&WmM 



Approval is requested fior the easployaent o£ Sataasr 
duritjg the periods of tlsse dssigsatcd belom 
fcioa £©r regalar teachers. 



Session faculty 
extra coapeasa- 



9 



June 3 to Juae 21, 195? 



% of 



Xitla 



Cashia, Samtoth B» Assoc. Pmf -, 

goodcbild, I. L. , Jr« Instructor 



100 



&316 



%ekiy 
Bate so 
be paid 



Gross 



$167.79 
107.90 



$503*10 
323.7© 



Joss 3 to Justs. 28. 1957 



Beyer, WttlJLra *§* 

C©e£a s ta^ad 1 J. 
Grow, llsossss A* 
Pira, Stord S. 
Boosts, Alfred X„ 



Ass t<, Pzof< 

Asst* Prof. 
Asst, Prof. 
Xastrssetor 
Instructor 



LOO 

100 



5538 



138.45 

132 . 60 
ISO. 15 
128.70 

123,50 



553.80 

530.40 



514.00 
494.00 



Bend, Robert S. 
KaeConaen? $. P. 

Sal^ak, Stanley F« 



Jraae 3 to J«saa 2§« 1957 

«mi«iiii»Miimn«iiMimiii ■■■iii»iiiii»nMniWi»i»i«>>»uwiiwiniiiiiuiniiiW iniii'iiiriw 



Instructor, Forestry 
Ass to Prof., Forestry 
Asst. Prof,, Fays. 



Jane 10 to J«a© 14. 1957 



4732 



11B, 30 
150*15 
150.15 



473.20 
600* &© 
600c60 



*fcfsrpay s Etta 
*Heoee2s!>, fiorotay 



Assoc. Prof . f S&irstag 100 
Assoc Prof* t Horsing 



5889 



147.22 
147.22 



147,22 
147.22 



Feaaell, 'Edward 6. 
Oliver 8 Caarles F. 
Tros2mll, &sa» H. 
tyllia, Eobert 



Jan© 10 to Jan© 28,. .1957 



Asst. Profo, Sdaescion 100 
Assoc. Prof <>', B«£ac&£loa 50 
Asst. Prof., E^aeatioa 100 
Asst. Prof., S&aeatlott 100 



530 % 
5070 



138.45 

83.85 
132.60 
126,75 



415.35 
251 • 55 
397.80 
380.25 



* B©o>tJalv©rsity Bssgloyaes 



OBXVSfiSOT OF M&S8ACH0SSEXS 



srnm school mvwimm 



4^™™i is racauasted for tbe «BHploya®nt of Sanaer Sesoioa faculty 
duri*s tl»lSct o? «?**£*•* JZ. "Si* rebate «"* c«*ene*. 
tlon for regelor teachers. 



th«& 3 to Jbnej, Sly, 1957 



% e£ Aontsal 



Title 



Caobts* tonaasth D. Assoc. Prof < 

Ooodebild, I. I», Jr. Instructor 



Boyer, Willis® H. 
Costa, Ansaad J. 
Grot?, Haos&a A, 
Pira, &tard S. 
Bsk&zSs, Alfred Ko 



«S@ss 3 to Jtone_28iJl§S. 



Acstc Prof* 
Asst. .?£©£« 
A»sto F;ef« 
Instructor 
Instructor 



100 
100 
IOC 
100 



4316 



5148 



Rate to 



$167.70 

107.90 



130.45 
132.60 
150.15 
128.70 

123.5© 



Gross 

Earnl 



$503.10 

323.70 



553.80 
530.40 
600.60 
514.80 

494.00 



Bond, Robert; 8.. 
KacConcel!* 8» *• 
Salvnsk, Stanley ? t 



flSSarp&y, Eita 



Fennell, B^ssasd 6. 
Oliver, Charles P. 

Trcstbnti, Asm H c 
grille, Sobert 



Jme 3 to Jcase 38a._ISSZ. 

LW)l<WHiMi>l|iii'ii i>W— I ■TiTI "I 



Instructor, Forestry 
Asst. Prof., Forestry 



■Tt»«a 1Q to Jena 28, 1957 



° » 



Aseoco Prof., Bdeeation 
Asst. Prof. » Edacatioa 
Asst. Prof., Edacatioa 100 



4731 



Jtme 10 to ^ttna_.14 .iL-lS§I 

Assoc Fro£«, lte*issg 100 5089 

Assoc. Frof., Iarsl«& 100 5889 



6708 

5304 
5070 



118.30 
150.15 

150.15 



147.22 

147.22 



138.45 

83.85 

132.60 

126.75 



473.20 
600o60 
600.60 



147,22 
147.22 



415.35 
251. 5S 

397.8© 
380.25 



* Ssn-Mtoeraity. Es^loyees 



•3 o 



bcyer, miltcm W. 
Costa, Arsand Jo 
Duns, Bans C. 

Liadsey, L S, 
Pira, Edward S. 



Amost 1 9 to i Saptea beg 6, , 1957 



Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 

Assistant Professor 
Head, Chera* Es@ineer. 
Ins tree tor 



ICO 


$5538 


$138o 45 


$415.35 


100 


5304 


132.60 


397. SO 


100 


.5070 


•126.75 


380.25 


100 


9464 


236.60 


709.80 


100 


5148 


12$. 70 


386.10 



1957 H&XB SESSXOfl 



July 1, 1957 to August JO. 1957 



Seutelle, Bar©14 B. 
Contine, Joseph 
Gallon, Bales F 
Curtis, Bonald 
Bcvls, ^Lilian A. 
Driver, Zdwla B. 
Fenaell, E«fesrd 6. 
Gascon, Paal A c 



Xitis 



% of 



Rt ta 



Sate to Gross 
be ©aid Earnings 



Assoc. Prof., Bath. 
Asst. Prof «, &&sl€ 

Assoc. Prof., Math. 

Instructor, Visual Aids 

Assoc* Prof* , 

Asst. Prof „ , 

Ass t w Prof. , Sdacat&ea 

Instructor, History 



$7527 

-5538 



:" 



3S 
100 



4524 
6981 

5772 

5530 



Goodwin, George, Jr* Assoc, Prof*, Govt* 
Harper, Richard B In© t meter, Speech 



Professor^ GoveKuss&t 
Assoc Prof. , Gorman 



Professor^ Math. 
Assoc* Prof o ,3osu tagg. 



Harris s Joan S» 

Keller, Pater 

Helming? Vernon P. 
*Jehnson, Richard E 

Johnson, Robert B. 
«Katee, Soils I»» 

Boohler, G. Stanley Assoc, Prof. , English 

Lane, Robert P* 
*Lloyd, Bonald J* 

McMaassy, Kary E. 

Beet, Claude C. 

9 Leery, Helen P. 

Oliver, Charles P. 

Peirce, Hs-osy B. 

Ricei, Banjaain,Jr e 

Sogers , Donald H* 

Rose, Israel B. 

&*din, Seyaour 

Saivak, Stanley P. 
&Scheadler, Sylvan 

V&tter, Harold 0. 

dealer, Sidney F* 

Hilfeiason, T. O. 



Assoc*, Prof. , 
Professor, Jteglisa 
Instructor, Education 
Head, Psychology 
Asst .Prof., Education 
Assoc, Prof*, Education 
Asst* Prof. , 
Ass t. Prof., 
Asstc Prof, 
Assoc. Prof* 



50 

50 

50 

100 

50 

100 

LOO 

100 

■ 

50 

100 

100 

50 
100 
100 

50 



431.6 

miz 



8372 



6708 

7380 
6708 



691 1 
4316 
9826 

553© 
6708 

5304 



Asst, 



Fdc 



Prof. 

Prof. 
Asst, Prof. 

Assoc, Prof., Economics 
Assoc* Prof. ,Ssg3,&8ag. 



100 

100 

50 

100 



?n 2 



Xnstructo?, Sociology 
Willlasss, Arthur R. Asst. Prof., English 
*Urif&t, Kanssta S, Assee. Prof,, Botany 

%mn, Rays&i&d Assoc, Prof..* ^is*Aids 



50 



62| 
100 



5070 
6006 
5772 
5889 
6162 
4940 
6240 
5SS9 
6708 



$188.17 

138.45 

160.87 

113.10 

87*26 

72.15 

138.45 

123, 50 

77.02 

53.95 

85.15 

167.70 

104.65 

170.30 

167.70 

184.50 

83.85 

80.43 

174.52 

107.90 

122.82 

138.45 

167.70 

66.30 

150.15 

144,30 

174.52 

63.37 

150*15 

72.15 

147.22 

X54.05 

61.75 

78.00 

94.22 

167.70 



$1129 
830 

965 

678 
523 
432 
830 
741 
462 
323 
510 

1006 
627 

1021 



1107 

503 
482 

1047 
647 
736 
S30 

1006 
397 
900 
Q6b 

1047 

zm 

432 
883 



02 

70 
22 
60 
56 



70 

00 
12 
70 



9fi 



20 
00 



:.: 
12 

AC 

70 

20 



12 

22 

90 
32 
30 



370*50 
468*00 
565.32 



J i 



<£> / 



OTHER SUMMER EMPIOgMBftr 



Approval is requested for the employment of the following faculty 
for the periods designated below. This represents extra compensa- 
tion. 

Dr. Carl S. Hoys, Head Department of Electrical Engineering*, from 
July 1 to August 9 , 1957. Dr. Hoys will assist in the supervision 
of the technicians in Engineering during the sunsuer. Considerable 
work is accomplished in the laboratories and in building in- 
structional equipment during this period of time. Br„ Soys will 
also assist with administrative planning for the fall, the adjust- 
sent of the schedules of students who have failed courses or who 
have to take reduced loads, and in the absence of the Bean, will 
be in charge of the School. He will also help with the super- 
vision of the "suzasar shop" program which operates all suEaser. 
His rate of compensation per week should he 2% per cent of his 
annual salary or §1,419.60 for the six weeks. 

Dr. Arthur R. tfilliass, Assistant Professor of English, from 
June 10 to June 21, 1957. Dr. Williams will supervise the pre- 
liminary sectioning of all students at the University. Ee 
should receive $200 for this work. 

Mr. Henry H. Skill ings. Instructor of Mathematics, frosa August 5 
to August 30, 1957. Mr. Shillings will supervise the final 
sectioning and also the scheduling of all students at the Uni- 
versity for the fall seisester, 1957-58. He will he responsible 
for section balancing (assailing of course-reservation cards 
into courses and sections) , preparation of course card section 
packs used as rosters for the first day of classes, checks for 
accuracy and coa^leteaass of scheduling, asd scheduling of 
special cases. Bis rate of compensation should be $107 per 
week or §428 for the four weeks. 

Mr. George R. Richason, Jr. and Joseph S. Marcus, Associate 
Professors of Chemistry and Civil Engineering respectively, 
free July 1 to August 23, 1957. The Assericaa Society of Engi- 
neer iug Education and the Atomic Energy Commission are sponsor- 
ing an institute for training in nuclear science and engineering 
and four advanced study programs at the Asses Leber atory of the 
ASC at Iowa State College from July 1 to August 23, 1957 (3 weeks). 
Professors Richason and Marcus have been notified of their 
acceptance to attend 8-week study program. Requisite for 
acceptance to the Institute is the willingness of the University 
of Massachusetts to contribute four weeks* salary which will be 
eere than matched by the AEC. Plans are being ease at the Uni- 
versity to expand the engineering offerings in nuclear engineer- 
ing and to offer related work in radio che&istry and physics. 
These course offerings will be saade possible through participation 
of Professors Richason and Marcus in the nuclear institute prograa. 
Their rate of compensation per week should be 2%% of annual 
salary or $670.80 and $643.48 respectively for Professors 
Richason and Marcus. 



9. 



OTHEB. SU»R EMPLQKBCTg (continued) 



The School of Engineering has had difficulty la locating a 
second instructor for the M.E. 28 Machine Shop course from 
June 3 to July 12, 1957. Finally the Van ftorffiaa Machine 
Cospany in Springfield, a part of the machine tool industry, 
was contacted. They have agreed to isake one of their tool 
asters, Martin J« Sa&a, available to us for the period 
June 3 to July 12 at the beginning rate of the instructor. 
His weekly salary Mil be $107.90 per week or §647.40 for 
the sis: week period of time. This is to be paid to the 
company and they in turn will continue Mr, Sawa on their 
payroll, social security, etc., and reimburse him for extra 
travel. This is another esasple of cooperation between in- 
dustry and our School of Engineering. 



i 



I 






TRUSTEE 



1973 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 24, 1957, 6:00 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

P RESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Boutin, Brown, 

" Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, Haigis, Hawes, 

McDermott, Taber, Whitmore; President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Trustee Brett reported that construction bids for 
dormitory #15 are considerably in excess of available funds. The 
architect is redrafting his plans to reduce the cost of the build- 
ing. The Trustees agreed that the size of the rooms should remain 
at 12 by 16 feet. Mr. Brett pointed out that the increased cost of 
construction and high interest rates might mean an increase in 
dormitory rental rates in the fall of 1958. 

After considerable discussion, it was agreed that no 

action could be taken at this time on the leases and final approval 

of the architect's changes. It was 

VOTED: To refer the matter of the leases and modi- 
fication in structure of dormitory #15 to 
the Executive Committee with full power to 
act for the Board. 

On the recommendation of the President, and after 

discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve the attached personnel actions. 

It was also 

V OTED - To approve the award of Atomic Energy Commission 

* stipends in the amount of $670.80 for Professor 

George R. Richason, Jr., and $645.50 for 
Professor Joseph S. Marcus for the four-week 
period July 29 - August 23, 1957. The stipends 
plus travel allowance will be placed in the Uni- 
versity trust fund. The University is to draw 
checks for the stipends and travel payable to 
Professors Richason and Marcus. 



Dormitory 

#15 



Personnel 
Actions 



Atomic Energy 

Commission 

stipends 



1974 



TRUSTEE 



Summer 
Session 



Out-of-State 
Students 



Out-of-State 

Students 

tuition 



Student 
Union 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To approve the following changes in Summer 
Session payments: 

(1) Cancel approval of Professor John S. Harris 
for 50% teaching during the summer. 

(2) Change payment for Professor George Goodwin, Jr. 
from 50% time to 100% time during the period 
July 1 - August 10, 1957 at the rate of $154.05 
per week or $924.30 for the six weeks. 

(3) Increase payment of Professor Charles F. 
Oliver to 100% time at the rate of $167.70 
per week or $503.10 for the three weeks of 
June 10 through June 28, 1957. (The Division 
of Vocational Education, State Department of 
Education, Boston, will reimburse the Uni- 
versity 50% of the total salary or $251.55). 

On the recommendation of Provost McCune and President 



Mather, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to admit out-of- 
state students in numbers not to exceed 5% 
of the entering class effective in the fall 
of 1958. 

It was also 

VOTED : That tuition for out-of-state students be fixed 
at $600 per year for undergraduates and $300 
per year for graduates effective in the fall 
of 1958. 

Chairman Bart let t asked to be recorded as voting against 

the tuition increase for out-of-state students. (Statement relative 

to the acceptance of out-of-state students is appended to these 



minutes . 



On the recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the transfer of $12,000 from the surplus 
of the University Store fund to the Student Union 
general fund and the transfer of $8,000 from the 
surplus of the Student Union food service fund to 
the Student Union general fund effective July 1, 
1957. 



! 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the University to establish a fee 
of $1.00 per student per year, effective 
September 1, 1957, to provide each student ex- 
cept special or part-time students not in 
residence, with a laminated identification card. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President or the Treasurer in 
consultation with the Chairman of the Board, to 
sign contracts and other agreements in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees with the Inter- 
national Cooperation Administration of the United 
States State Department to carry out the provi- 
sions of the agreement between Hokkaido Univer- 
sity and with the University of Massachusetts, 
all costs to be borne by ICA. 

The Trustees discussed the budget for operation of the 

Student Union for the fiscal year June 1, 1957 to June 30, 1958 

and 

VOTED : To approve the Student Union budget in the 
amount of $167,776.75. 

Chairman Bart let t said that the proposed University 
budget for the year beginning July 1, 1958 has been in the hands 
of the Board members for the past week or ten days for their 
study. He then opened the meeting to questions which were 
answered by the President and Treasurer. It was noted that 
the budget includes funds for the first phase of operating the 
instruction program of the University on a year-round basis. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to submit a 
budget of $9,192,355.00 for maintenance for 
the year beginning July 1, 1958. 



1975 



Student 

Identification 

Cards 



Hokkaido 
University 



Student 

Union 

Budget 



University 
Budget 



1976 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to submit 
budget requests for the following special 
items for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1958: 

Reimbursable research $ 75,000 

Commonwealth Scholarships. .......... 25,000 

Library books 100 , 000 

Roads, walks and parking areas...... 200,000 

Equipment 100 , 000 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



APPOIKSHESTS ABOVE MIHIMUM 



mim*m-*i ****** iu+M*i****iL*mjHkl*i 



Dr. Bruce $* Gained* Assistant Professor "A" Veterinary Science, 
effective Septes&ar I, 1957 at $7,52? per year (nasdsmisj) • Graduated 
from Cornell University with both tlie Doctor of Veterinary Medicifse 
end Masters degrees • He is currently e staff isenfcer at Cornell 
University. 

&r* Justine Cobb, Instructor in Physical Education, effective 
September 1, 1957 at 04,732 per year (2 steps above eiinisuad. M.S. 
Springfield College; $2* Ed. Pennsylvania State University. For the 
past four years, he has been Supervisor of Hsysical Education for 
School Union #33, Kingston, Massachusetts* 

Dr. Edwin W. Hancsaryfc, Assistant Professor W A W Hoibo Bceaosd.es, 
effective July 1, 1957 at $6, 70S per year (3 steps above isinitsum)* 
S.A. , M.A. Brown University; Hi.D, Korthwestem, !!e is currently 

Instructor in Econoraics at Brown University. 

Hr. Curtis A. Johnson, Associate Professor W A W Agricultural Engineer- 
tag, effective July 1, 1957 at $3,068 per year (4 steps above lainisasa), 
B.S. Nebraska University; M.S. Iowa State College* Currently he is 
Agricultural Engineer for the International Cooperation Administration 
In Pakistan* 

Mr. Jolm H. Koyes, Associate Professor "A" Forestry, effective 
August 11, 1957 at $7,748 per year <3 steps at>ove ©inirnint). B.S. 
University of Connecticut, £3*F« Yale. He is currently forester (Fire 
Control) Bivision of State and Private Forestry, R-7, $.S„ Forest 

Service in Pennsylvania* 

Mr. Eeel Eteebenacker, Assistant Athletic Coaeh, effective Septea&er 1, 
1957 at $5,538 fer year (2 steps afeove ainisau®.) B.S* and &S» 
University of Massachusetts* He is currently employed as teac&er- 
coacli in Bedford High School System, Bedford, Massachusetts* 

Dr. Philip Eosen, Professor of Physics, effective Septes&er 1, 1957 
ct $7,748 per year (3 steps above saiai&uis). B.S* in Gta&ical Engineer- 
ins ^roifi the City College ©f Slew 3ozfc$ Hs.0. Yale University. 
Currently e&ployed in the Bspartsssnt of Faysles at tne University of 
Connecticut. 

Miss I*ancy C. Rupp, Instructor in Haysical Education for Wossen, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $4*732 per year <2 steps above minisasra) «, 

B.S. Sargent College. Currently teaching at Iowa University. 

!fr* Bemsn Tsssan. Instructor in Haysics, effective Septesfeer 1, 1957 
at $5,148 per year (4 steps above oiniaon). B.$/ Illinois Institute 
of Technology; II* S* Sort&western University. E©pes to complete rc- 
quiressenEs for Ph.D. in August. Currently te&cniiag Faysics at 

Eortlswestem Sniversity. 

Mr* Joseph Troll, Instructor ! W Agronomy, effective September 1, 1957 
at $5,772 per year C3 steps above minis»um). B.S. and 21. S* University 
of SSao&n Island* Ha is currently in the Bepartsaant of Plant Petnology~ 
Entomology at tne University of Eke&e Island. 

Hr. Alfred S3. %sme. Instructor in Chemistry, effective Septaaker 1, 
1957 at $5,148 per year (4 steps above ssia&smnO. S.S., 8.S* University 
of Haine* Currently easployed by tno Sastsan Kodak Ccspasy. 



aPPOBJESSOTS 



Ssvid C. Bisehoff, Assistant Professor of Fkysical Education, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $5070 per year. 

Mrs. Fresia H. Bradford, Instructor In fionanee Languages (half- 
tise) effective Septcn&osr l 9 1957 at §2158 p®g year. 

Ana H. Coreones, instructor £a Bosonce kanguagas (aalf-tima) 
effective September 1, 1957 at §2158 per year. 

ftobort J. James, instructor la Physical l&icat&on, effective 
Septac&er i, 1357 at $4316 per year. 

Klaus E. Kroner, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

effective Scptes&er X, 1957 at $5070 g»cr year. 

Mrs. Beverly Mey s Instructor in Speech a effective Septes»^er l, 1957 
at $432.6 per yesr. 

Merton 2. 8©senl*erg ? instructor in Slectri&al lagi&eering <aaif* 
tise) effective Sept&s&er I, 1957 at $2158 per year. 

Miss ¥era Sickels, Instructor in Speech (!&&£* > fci&B) effective 
Septes&er 1, 1957 at $2262 par year. 



I 






John If. Autlerson from Assistant Professor of Accounting £ c Associate 
Professor of Accounting, effective Septenibor I, 1957 at $6,262 per 
year {I step above zainiijaisj). 

Theodore So Bceon, Jr. f rota half ~tiise Instructor in Landscape 
Architecture to Assistant 2l*ofessor of Landscape Architecture 
<oue*hnlf tlsso) effective Septeis&cr 1, 1957 at annual salary of $2,769* 

Borotfey Davis £zom Assistant Professor of Itee 'Econcalca to Associate 
Professor of Base Economics, effective September 1, 1957 at annual. 
salary of $5,889. 

Robert If. Bay from Assistant Professor of Maetsasaical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective Septenker 1, 
1957 at annual salary of $5,889. 

Helen Q' Leery froB Assistant Professor of Education to Associate 
Professor of Education, effective Se?tes&e? 1, 1957 at annual salary 
of $5,1 



l 



L. Lawrence Taylor from Assistant Treasurer to Coo/troller "A" 
U of H, effective July t s 1957 at annual salary of $9,230. 



mm ztm w gba&b of professor 

■ iiMt m wni iir i ir i inn i tnir tiinn i ir n u>iiniimMii » r<r m nM r it * i hum * i phii ihiiiiiiiiiii 

Sobers T. Curran, Division of Hiysical Education, from Associate. 
Professor to Professor, effective Septes&e? I, 1957 at annual 
salary of $7,124, 



! 



mi'lam *. Boyer, Assistant Professor la ct ^ l 3^ m l^^! 
mW«M« 1. 195? from $5,53® to $6,00* C 4 steps 

above sdaiBsom). 

Fred V, Csfeill, Jr., Bean ofi fche College of ^JJ^f^f^' 
Sttolept^er l> 1957 ta» $10,322 to *U»*S (4 steps 

above gsinifficis) - 

Fat-s G Beus. Assistant Professor of Ctaicsl SsgSaeeffiae, 
oSLava ^t^er 1, 1957 torn $5,070 to $S,53S (2 steps above 

siGitasra) • 

Ited-H. BAiasfe, Assistant £rofe S sor of El eeaM „|^f ^ 
effective September 1, i957 freis $S,3G4 to $5,77£ C3 steps above 

Jofcn A, Fitagereld, Assistant Btofessor of &«***«* ?T^!? 9 
Stive S^tedbe* I, W *» »^I0 to $5 9 S30 C£ steps above 



• 



£rtb«r C. Gentile, Assistant: tofeasor o£ Botany, elective 
SSSber XTX9W £b«i §5,070 te $S,S3S (2 steps abo*e mntaa). 

eiont elective Scoter I, MW, few $5,889 to #6,SS1 (4 steps 

ebove jaixjifsaiffl) • 

R4ciup>da H Earrinswm, Assistant Professor of Hechanieal Engiueer- 
*£ olLclive Mtar i, 1957 from $9,304 to $5,772 (3 steps above 

jofen 8. tostaSto, assist Mta£ f STrS^iff'SS?' 

effective SeptcsSier 1, 195? £hsb $5,304 to $5,772 <3 steps above 

James i. tadtte, Associate Professor of tetoss F t iss ^* ?^f lw 
, s^ftofcer 1, i» froa $6,435 to $S,$S1 (4 steps above itosc^. 

- Mary E, Xtifaaasp, tetimcttw in E&icatlo®, effective Septet* 1, 
193? firms $4,316 to $4,732 (2 steps eVoro s$aSsia0. 




fillUs&t ©. Scott, Dizeeter of Ota&nt Union, effective July I, 1^57 

'irons $7,644 to $8,372 (2 steps above ssiBimsm),, 



£ 



Jena H. Spencer, laatiacto* in Sfaeteical ^laeeiiis, effective 

Sc^eScr i! 1957 from $4,310 to $4,732 C2 steps above e^tasii). 

Marv Jane Stvottnsr, Aealsteat Professor of mm Eeaaasics, 
cfcLtSe Septate 1, 1*» **» $5,533 to $6,000 (4 steps above 



mm 



Hrs. Margaret HUbola, Assistant Professor of Bern* Bmsmlcs, 
effective September 1, 1957 from $5,772 to $6,240 (5 steps above 



'mm EHHflglSgKg (Changes in AnsointeBaat} 

On Juste 1, 1957 the Trustees spprowd the Summer Session eisployi«eat 
of Dr. S&chard E. Johnson., Visiting Professor ©£ Matbsssatics and Br. 
Israel E. Base, Associate Processor of Mathematics at the tSaiveraity. 
Shey were alloyed as teachers for the CuuBter Institute for "High School 
Mathematics teachers during the period July 1 - August 10, 1957. Their 
salaries ware listed as $1,021.80 and $1,047.12 respectively. It is 
reeossBeaded that the salaries paid from State funds and £roa the Grant 
fund of the National Science Foundation be listed as follows: 



StG-fcS Ftjssds 



Grant Steads 



Total 



Br. Elehard &. Johnson 
• Israel H. Rose 



$715,26 



$784,74 

767.04 



* 



1 



Use rates of ccx&peasation £rom state feasts were ccasputed on the basis 
of 2% per cent of esmoal salaries en a 7© par cent teaching schedule, fhc 

Grant Fund includes condensation for: 

1. 'M% teaching schedule during July I, "August 10, 1957 

2. 100% teaching schedule during August 12-16, 1957 

3. Administrative work in the institute 

Br. Bobert W. Wagner, Professor of Sfatheioatics is Director of the 
gussetr Institute for High School Mathematics Teachers. According to the 

3 o£ the Batloasl Selene® Foundation grant, Br. Eagaer should he 
paid §1,599 eat o£ Grant funds for directing this program July 1-August 16, 1957, 



On June 1, 1957 the Urus&eas approved the es^loytsoafc of Br» Sylvan 
Schendlcr daring the st&Ss&r session period July 1-Augast 10 „ 1957. His 
i^aeasatiea, based tspon a 50 per cast teaching schedule or $72.15 per 
sieak, totaled $432.90 for the sis-weak period. St is requested that this 
be changed to a 65 par cast teaching schedule of $93.79 per week or 
$562.74 for the eiK-weck period. 

On Jane 1, 1957 the Trustees approved the eosployssent of Edwin P. 
Brivar, Assistant Frofossor of Sociology, during the onerae* session paries 
July 1-AagusS 10 9 1957. His coseensation was eased upon a 5Q per cent 
teaching cehedule. Siiise thca 9 *?a have learned t&at Mr. Sriver will not 

be here during the susmer and ^e request authorisation to eisploy 
Wilkinson on a 100 per cent bs&i® instead of the 5© per cent basis 
approved for hi® on June 1. Therefore the wesfely rate to be paid will 
be $123.50 or $714.00 for the sis«weeh period. 



K Eg^jcj (ure*«WCTam>j»<ap«Mfc.t«a»»it umJ ■imjwBma.n i — i . w mw MMrfw^gKt* 



Zsits, Anthony 



title 

Asst. fret". , 



7* of Annual Week 

tjxa gata^ to m b@ ..paid^ gamines terlod 

100 $6006 $150.15 $150.15 6/24-6/21 



apetroae, Theresa 2ns true tar , Parsing 100 4316 
* Konf-Qaivsrsity employee 



107.90 



971,10 6/3-8/2 






hmU 2L Baker, Assistant Protosor M A M B&iry & Astael Scie»ee„ 
for dm period Jmm 30 Shressgh &?past 24, 1957 „ afe aiamal satej 
of $5,889. 

Mvid A„ Evans, Assistant Professor M A M S&alry & Aidiaal Scieae®, 
for the period Jen® 3© tligwgh &asgsis£ 21, 195? * at assaseal ealary 
©f $5,889. 

Jo&» Ho Fester, Assisted £refees@r "A" AgrlGnl&ml leomsale©, 
for the period Jssss© 30 ttes^gk Jety 29 „ 1957, at mmml salary 
of 15,889. 



fhilip Seertai, Xastsaeeer ?S A SB Asriaaltural tammta, far the 
perled Jtasse 10 thxeagli Saptasfeer 7, 19 5% at mmm& salary of $5,070, 



Frank Eo Better, Asaietaafc ffsefesaer "A M aalsr & Asfcaal Seiea«e, 
far the aarlad .teas 30 tfcresgb ^agsst 21, 1957, at eesas&l salary 
e£ $5,889. 



Sirs* Mary ©<, letnre, tetesstesr M A W Agriealtissal Saeasisies, far 
the parted Jeaa 3 tta&s^i Agpasst SI, 1957, at agonal salary e£ 
$5,070* 



Fraafe E Stay, Associate Prefeaaer W A M Seteoelegy, far the parla4 
30 ttaooBJh tegsast 17, 1957, at mmml aatey a* $8,372. 



Eteksrd A. Seotfeoiel;, lostrs&stor "A" %Eeoeay, £s& the p«sr&®d 

July 1 tta^fe &n@»s& 27, 1957 , at aoeaei sutay off $5,©7@o 



coaitBCriog lasiaMER wmmmm 

Heary E c Shillings, Instract^sr kn tei£h£feiOtMss, «&* ti^£.oved Ja&e 1, 

1957 for the period £m%mt 5 ttamgfo A-ugusfc 30, 1957 at she rat© 
or $iO?„O0 per week or $42S.0O for the four sseekso His rate should 
be $139»l© per wsefc or a total of $5S6.4© for the fear weeks e 



EKEMSUS 



Eclph 11. Ecnaidson be xsade Extension Professor of AsrosxHsy, Stseritus, 
effective on his retirciaejst Jtme 30, 1957 ♦ 

John B. Eversoia be wade Assistant Professor of ^groaoxiy, Emeritus, 
effective on his retirement Awgust 31, 1957. 



m2zBmj&gm§£!i 



To approve step-rate increases for ses&ers of fclie professional 
staff of the University in accorda&ce s?lfch fc&e state sc&edtal© as 
earned and payable during the saoath' of £s@ust 3.957. 



OUT-OF-ST&TE STUDENTS 

It is recommended that the University be authorised to admit out-of- 
state students, in numbers equivalent to five per cent of the entering class, 
effective in the fall of 1958. 

It is also recommended that tuition for out-of-state students be fisted 
at $600 per year for undergraduates and $300 per year for graduates, effective 
in the fall of 1958. 

The following memorandum from Provost H&Gune to President Mather provides 
the background for these recommendations : 

"We have had numerous discussions concerning the admission of students who 
reside outside the Gommon«©alth, At the present time, through administrative policy 
%jaich has been approved by the Board of Trustees e such students (except for isolated 
specialised cases) have not been admitted. 

I urge a change in the policy to go into effect In September of 1958. Under 
the proposed new policy, the Registrar rasuld be authorised to admit out-of-state 
students up to a answer equivalent to 5 per cent of the entering class. 

I feel that such a policy has merit for many reasons. Briefly stated, the 
inclusion of out-of-state students should broaden the base of our student body. 
It would enable our Massachusetts students to get acquainted with students from 
other parts of the United States. It uould absolve us from the charge of discrimina- 
tion and save students from the CosssosBsalth from retaliation by universities in 
other states « 

In this new proposed policy X advocate that the Registrar be instructed to 
set up certain priorities for out-of-state students. High on the list would be 
students who ua&t to take specialised programs tshleh we are uniquely or well 
qualified to offer (e.go food technology). Another priority tsould fee for students 
~*&e have family connections tslth the University (for euas^le, children of alusiai 
or former staff Essabers) or the Ccmaaomsealth (for example children of Army officers 
or civil servants f&ose homes have been in Massachusetts). Finally, priority 
should be given to students f roa distant states so that a broadened student body 
may result. 

Along mith this change in policy X recommend a change in the tuition 
rates for out-of-state students. They are no» set at $400 for undergraduates 
and $220 for graduate students. I advocate a change to $600 for undergraduates 
and $300 for graduate students. I feel that the advantage for graduate students 
is justified because of the na&d to provide isore graduate education opportunities 
at lot? cost. The figure of $600 for undergraduates is still less than our esti- 
mated cost of instruction per student but it more nearly approximates it and 
thus is less a burden on the taxpayers of the CossBOnuealth. 

I hope that this proposed sour policy may be presented to the Board of 
Trustees for their approval at the meeting of June 24th. I am purposely sending 
copies of this memorandum to other persons on the campus ?&o may wish to send 
you their comments." 



June 7 8 1957 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



PAGES 1977-78 NOT USED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



T 



TRUSTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
September 30, 1957, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 
Chairman Bart let t presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boutin, Boyden, 

Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, Haigia, 
McNamara, Perry, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



Dr. Boyden reported the actions of the joint meeting of 
the Trustee Committees on Faculty and Program of Study and on Agri- 
culture which took place September 25 at the University. 

On the recommendation of these committees, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of new under- 
graduate courses. 

To approve the attached list of new graduate 
courses. 

To authorize change in name of the Master's 
degree conferred by the School of Education 
from Master of Science to Master of Education. 

To authorize the Master of Education program 
to include up to 15 credits, of the total of 30 
required for the degree, from graduate courses 
in fields other than Education as approved by 
the Dean of the School of Education. 

To authorize the present Departments of Pomology, 
Floriculture and Olericulture to be brought to- 
gether as a Department of Horticulture in the 
College of Agriculture and to name Professor 
Arthur P. French, now Head of the Department of 
Pomology, as Head of this new department, 
effective October 1, 1957. 



1979 



Undergraduate 
Courses 

Graduate 
Courses 

Master of 
Education 



Department of 
Horticulture 



1 



TRUSTEE 



Department of 
Entomology and 
Plant Pathology 



Art 
Courses 



Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To authorize the following activities to be 
brought together into a Department of 
Entomology and Plant Pathology in the College 
of Agriculture: (a) Department of Entomology, 
(b) Shade Tree Laboratory, (c) Seed 
Laboratory, (d) Arboriculture (now in the 
Department of Landscape Architecture), (e) 
Plant Pathology (now in Botany), (f) all 
members of the Experiment Station and Exten- 
sion staffs having primary responsibility as 
plant pathologists or botanists. 

To authorize the courses in Art, now offered 
in the Department of Landscape Architecture 
in the College of Agriculture, to be trans- 
ferred to the College of Arts and Science as 
soon as the President is convinced that the 
change can be made effectively, it being under- 
stood that when the change is made, the present 
personnel in Landscape Architecture who conduct 
Art courses will be transferred to the College 
of Arts and Science. 

On the recommendation of the Faculty of the University 
and the President, it was 

VOTED : To confer Baccalaureate degrees on the 

following candidates effective September 
30, 1957, provided that outstanding bills 
are paid and with the exception that the 
Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded to 
Dorothy Mary Matuszko Goclowski as of 
June 3, 1957. (See attached list) 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School faculty 
and the President, it was 

VOTED: To confer the following graduate degrees 
effective September 30, 1957. (See 
attached list) 

The Trustees reviewed appointments, promotions and 
other personnel actions since the last meeting of the Board, and 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the personnel actions as listed 
in the attached sheets. 



After discussion by the President and Treasurer, the 



Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the use of income from overhead 
received on trust fund sponsored research to 
promote and support additional research, in- 
cluding the employment of necessary personnel. 
(Full recommendation and explanation is 
attached to these minutes). 

The Trustees also 

VOTED : To authorize the University Scholarship 

Committee to use $5,000 of the unrestricted 
funds in the trust fund interest account for 
grants-in-aid to students, grants for student- 
athletes to be expended in accordance with 
the principles and policies for the conduct 
of intercollegiate athletics as stated on 
pages 36, 37 and 38 of the current Eastern 
College Athletic Conference Manual. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Board has previously 

authorized the conveyance of certain land at Walt ham for the 

purpose of permitting the widening of Beaver Street which adjoins 

the University Field Station. To complete the necessary legal 

action, the Trustees 

VOTED : That under the authority of Chapter 538 of 
the Acts of 1957, three parcels of land at 
the Waltham Field Station, as described in 
deed of conveyance executed this date by 
the Trustees, be conveyed to the County of 
Middlesex for the purpose of widening and 
relocating Beaver Street in Waltham. 

President Mather reported on his conference with Mr. Asa 
Bushnell, Commissioner of the Eastern College Athletic Conference 
relative to procedures permissible on athletic grants of aid and 
stated that Mr. Bushnell is satisfied that the University policy 
is entirely in keeping with the rules and spirit of ECAC. 

The President reported on the University Maintenance 
Budget and provided comparisons over the past several years which 
show that the budget picture is steadily improving. He reported, 
also, that the University has received a total of $16,987.00 for 



1981 



Trust Fund 

Sponsored 
Research 



Inter- 
collegiate 
Athletics 



Waltham 

Field 

Station 



1982 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



capital outlay in the last four years. 

President Mather stated that despite the increases in 
teachers salaries attained under the Barrington Report, it will be 
necessary to work aggressively on this problem in the next few 
years. Unless this is done it will be impossible to hold or re- 
cruit the quality and number of staff necessary to carry on the 
work of an expanding university. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



HSK U&D££GB&iHI&T£ COURSES 



The Course of Study Coisadttee recommends that 

Landscape Architecture 80 (II) History and Literature of Landscape 

Architecture be dropped and be replaced by the sew course 

feSfeg.^^..&Yi?MlffifiifE^?..M..iffiX History and Literature of Landscape 
Architecture. The history and literature of landscape 

architecture and allied fields, including the application 
In design of forms, stotlfs, and cos$»osition drawn froa 
nature. 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Mr. Otto 

Industrial Administration 66 (XX) Transportation and Traffic he dropped 
and he replaced by the new course 

Industrial Administration 65 Principles of Transportation. The 
development and growth of transportation facilities as 
a function of the production and distribution of goods 

is examined. State structures and transportation law 
are considered as they affect the relationships between 
carriers and shippers . 
3 class hours 3 credits 

Hof? Course 

Account i*ng,.64« Advanced Cost Accounting. A continuation of the 

theory and practice of cost accounting «rlth emphasis on 
standard, estimated, and distribution costs. 
3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite, Accounting §3 

New Course 



Account la ^ 78 » Advanced Federal Tex Procedures* Advanced phases of 
Federal taxation eith particular attention to Inventories, 
depreciation, accounting methods. Study and preparation 
of returns for partnerships, corporations 9 estates and 

trusts; 

Federal estate, and Federal $l£fc tases. 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite, Accounting ?3 



UllBEEGE&BUATE C OURSES 
Change in Sttjreeyif&CeuTSG 

i - .11 tit IWi ■!—■!■ Mil !—■■» am ii ■ ■■■marnw i<Mfrnwn»i ii«ih» <w*n 

It is recosssanded that the present one-semester, S-credit course in 
surveying, Civil Engineering 25, be replaced t?ith two 3-credit courses, <one 
in each semester) to be teiscnm as Civil Eaglneering 31 end Civil Engineering 32* 

C.E. 31 (X) Surveying* Theory of surveying including: the use, care end 

adjustment of tape, transit and level; traverse cos^utations; topographic 
surveying and snapping by stadia; elementary astronomical surveying. 

1 clans hour, 2 3-hour laboratory periods Credit 3 

C*E» 32 (XI) Eoute Surveying. Route surveys including; center line layout; 
sitEple, compound, reverse, parabolic and spiral curves; construction sur- 
veys; earthwork computations; chainag© equations* 

2 class hours, 1 3»hour laboratory period 

Prerequisite C.E, 31 Credit 3 



Kissing 3L Introduction to Kursis^ 1. An orientation course designed to 
assist the student in her personal adjustment to the basic collegiate 
nursing program. 
1 class hour 16 tveelcs Credit 1 

Hiss Kelly 

Kursing 2 Fundamentals of S&srsins 1. A basic course planned to introduce 
the student to the ©ajor health needs of the nation, and to the coissuttity 
organisations designed to help individuals and fas&lies to saeet these problem. 
1 class h«?ur 16 creeks Credit 1 

Hiss Mahar 
Hiss Kelly 

Nursing 25 Fundamentals of Parsing 2. A basic course designed to 
£aiBi!iarise the student tilth the privileges and responsibilities inherent 
in nursing as a profession. 
1 class hour 16 tfseks Credit 1 

Miss Macdoaald 

Hew Course - Wildlife 



*u-Wii»Trf»',iiiiiii^i 



HildliSe Mansgcisent 85 (X) Wildlife Literature. A review of the ©ore 

pertinent literature relating to vertihrat© anisaels and their ecology. 
1 2-hr. seminar Credit 2 



Education 



HUH iHHTHllll*.— IWW*I I iM|i II n m mi 



Xt is reconsHended that the graduate program for the School o£ Education lead 
to the degree Master o£ Education rather than to that of Master or" Science. 

It is recomended that the Master of Education program he permitted to in- 
clude up to giftcen graduate credits, out of the total of thirty reojuired for the 
degree,. £ron graduate courses in fields other than Education,.! as approved by the 
Bean of the School of Education* 

See attached saterial in support of these recossiendatioas* 



raj G&amim courses 

The Graduate School Council reccisrcands to the President and Board of 
Tswstees approval o£ the following courses for graduate students enlyi 

GEOLOGY 

204. H3KE0US MB MET&SOISPHZC ?STB0Z£GYo Description classif ieatioa, 
and origin of igneous and actaBorphie socks • Laboratory tserk emphasises 
tfes ®se ©£ the petrosrephie saieroseope* • 
£rereanisites: Osggasl E&nsralQgy 201 and Litholsgy 15$. Credit 3 

205* SB3K2&S7ABY PSXaOLSSY, A study ©£ the natural history of 
sedimentary rochs by all a??allahle laboratory iscfchoas* Ml physical. 
rock properties are subjected to critical analysis, and resulting data 
are interpreted with special reference to origin of thg rooks studied* 
Prerequisites: Optical S&neralogy 201, Sedissentation 212* Credit 2 

239 » smMmB G3flKG8£HG&0Gg. A critical study of selected topics 

and current problems in geaEDSptsoIogy. 

^erequisites : Gaesiorpisologiy 161 „ Credit 2 

H§» EOONGffiC OTTOSt"* A course dealing with the origin, classifica- 
tion, and uses of aetallic and nou-ssatalli© mineral deposits* 
Prerequisites: Hinaralogy 151, 152, Lithotomy 156, and 

Structural Geology 173. Credit 3 



V$%GBfflJ&% 



l«HWBHIfe«l 



Braosss: 



257, 258c $mSM& VB C&XEXQ8& ?SOT0L&S¥o Selected topics of currant 
aigniSieanee related to the field of clinical psychology «£11 be 

studied intensi^elyo Setamnt empirical resooscih studies will fee 
analysed and recant thearatlaal advances «ill he espUunsdo Either 
semester ssay he elected independently* Both assy he taken only with 
change in topic 

fsarcasisites Ferssissian of Instructor • Credit 2 

each sassester 



201, 202. U38SA38S95 CF aMSXC&H m&Stm* Interpretations of sajor 
theses as developed in the ^srks of leading historians • The first 
course Bill treat the period through the Civil iter* the second, 18&5 
to the present. Credit 4 

each oeaaeter 

205. tbb es& e^ we Gtmssm&sim &m tm cmmssmm* Ta© ©tu% of 

the £©rsativ© years «£ the <tariean nation. Ssshasis vill he placed 
on the evolution o€ £@&erel and state constitutions, basic political 

issues and conflicts, the pattern of econesic and social developasnt, 
and the origins of ^®eriaan foreign policy,, Credit 3 

2S$» SMX^as IS rm m& CS? <S$bBIS0§IX&2!! D^SSRSSACS. Training in 

historical rasaarcb. 

Adsaission hy conseafc of ifoa instructor. Credit 3 



(Memorandum to the Graduate School Council) 

Education March 29, 1957 

Dean Jeffrey, Graduate Office 
A Master of Education degree 



The School of Education requests that its graduate 
program "be listed under the heading of Master of Education 
rather than Master of Science as at present. This v:ill give 
recognition to the fact that our graduate work is professional 
in character rather than devoted entirely to research. 

I am enclosing a pamphlet which the staff has "been 
working on. It describes the program which we have developed 
during the past year with several policy changes which went into 
effect in February. Y/e feel that these plans v/ill strengthen 
our work very much. Please note especially the provisions for 
various types of students (Policy Statement #l) • The problem 
of specials is particularly acute in the School of Education and 
we feel these new provisions will tighten up that loose end. 
We also feel that provision for advisers for each student during 
his entire program is particularly needed because of the many 
part— time students working for the degree. 

The only additional provision which appears to 
necessitate a vote of the Graduate Council is that in programs 
A and C the student be isrmitted to take up to fifteen hours of 
graduate work in the content fields of general education. This 
is to insure a better general education on the part of students 
whose undergraduate program emphasised professional training to 
too great an extent. 

The catalogue write-up for the new degree would be 
substantially the same as that for the Master of Science degree. 
I have enclosed copies of a suggested write-up. 



Specifically, the School of Education recommends: 

(1) That the graduate program for the School of 
Education lead to the degree of Master of Education rather 
than to that of Master of Science. 

(2) That the Master of Education program be per- 
mitted to include up to fifteen graduate credits, out of 
the total of thirty required for the degree, from graduate 
courses in fields other than Education as approved by the 
Dean of the School of Education. 



A. \h Purvis 



I- ■ 



"From Education 

To Dean Jeffrey, Graduate Office 

Subject Master of Education 



I think the time has come for the Graduate . School Council to give 
consideration to the advisability of establishing a Master of Education degree 
for the graduate programs in the School of Education. As you know, we were a 
Department of Education in the School of Liberal Arts until September 1, 1956 
when we were established as a School of Education by Board of Trustee action. 
As a Department it was perhaps natural that our program of graduate work should 
be listed as leading to the Master of Science degree as was a large part of the 
graduate work of the University. With the growth of the University and its 
Graduate School and with the development of various professional schools, in- 
cluding the School of Education, the time would appear ripe for a re-considera- 
tion of policy. 

The graduate policy of the usual College of Arts and Science has been 
largely an outgrowth of the German University Graduate Policy With its intense 
interest in research. I think we can say with accuracy that the Master of 
Science has tended to be a research degree the major purpose of which has been 
to discover more and more information, understandings, and new relationships in 
the various fields of science. To a considerable extent the Master of Arts has 
followed this same pattern although in Arts there has been some tendency to 
emphasise creative activities in literature as well* These are indeed worthy 
objectives and I think every effort should be made to encourage more graduate 
work of this kind and to strengthen the programs already established. 

However, the School of Education is frankly a professional school r 
It has one major objective above all else on the Master degree level — to iia- 
prove the public school program by providing better teachers and better super- 
visors, administrators and other school personnel. It has various minor 
objectives of course, including research, but these are secondary and important 
only insofar as they contribute to our major objective. As I noted above, this 
is particularly true of programs leading toward the Master's degree. Here we 
are concerned with programs for the improvement of teachers and for the trailing 
of supervisors, principals, guidance directors and others. In some of these 
programs we give considerable emphasis to research but only as a means of im- 
proving the particular training program, not as an end in itself. We bell v a 
that the objectives of such a professional program are valid in a Graduate 
School and we believe that such degree programs are just as high in the qvv J :Uy 
of work performed as are research degree programs. We do feel, however, tha s ; 
there are reasons which make it desirable that they be separated in name aw 
they are in objective. Eor this reason we are requesting that our graduate 
program lead to the Master of Education. 

You will note in the enclosed description of our program that we are 
not asking for many changes from the usual graduate policy — merely that we 
be permitted to use fifteen hours of the thirty graduate hours in some cases to 
insure that the students fill in gaps in their general education. This together 
with greater use of the pre-requisite provision are in line with our general 



policy, "both undergraduate and graduate, that school personnel should "be well 
educated people. The other policy Matters listed are ones deemed necessary "by 
the School staff to preserve the quality of a professional degree which is ob- 
tained for the most part "by teachers-in-service who take their course work on 
a part-time "basis. This description is included in the form of a, proposed 
pamphlet which we have prepared for graduate students in case the proposal is 
accepted "by the Graduate School Council and the Board of Trustees. 



Albert ¥. Purvis 



** ->«=*v 



^ proposed Write-up for the Graduate Catalogue) 



MASEEH OF EDUCATION 



The degree is conferred upon graduate students who 
have met the following requirements* 

1. Thirty graduate credits of which no more than 
six may he transferred from other institutions. Fifteen 
of the thirty credits must he in Education, and of these 
twelve credits must "be earned in courses open to graduate 
students only. No credit is valid after 6 years. 

2. Either the Problem or Field Study is required 
and the student must pass a written and an oral general 
examination. Credits in problem courses are limited to 
six* 

3. All fees and expenses must "be paid "before the 
degree will he conferred. 

AlH.-'-of the ahove requirements must he completed hy 
the applicable date listed helow 

fey 28 
September 10 
February 1 

if the degree is to be received at the Commencement following 
the particular date. 



if '! 



UHI73ESITT CJ k&SSACHUS.HiTT$ 
SCHOOL CP HDUCA^IOH 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The School of Education conducts an extensive Graduate Program for full 
and part-time students with courses and workshops in late afternoons, evenings , 
and in summer. This program is intended to "be of service to the following 
peoples 

Full-time graduate students working for the Master of Education. 
Part-time graduate students working for the Master of Education in 
late afternoon and evening courses or in Summer School or in a combination 
of both* 

Full-time graduate students from Liberal Arts Colleges who wish to 
prepare for teaching through the Master of Arts in Teaching Degree. 

Part-time graduate students who are teaching and who wish course."; 
for professional improvement but are not working for a degree. 

Part-time graduate students who wish to prepare to meet certifica- 
tion requirements for teaching o 

Insofar as admission to the Graduate School is concerned these studer':.: 
are divided into three groups as is shown in the following Policy Statemto.it ifl« 

POLICY STiiTSBl-SJFT #1 
Policy with Regard to Admission to Graduate "work 
Introducti on 

<■■ i.— .— a m i n — >■ !■ ■ i> — 

So far as admission to graduate work is concerned, there r.re three types 
of students: 

Student #1 A student with a good undergraduate record and good 
recommendations for graduate study who wishes a degree program. 



- 2 - 

S tud ent #2 A student who wishes to take courses for professional 
improvement, or other good reason, "but is not interested in an advanced 
degree program. 

Student -,fo A relatively poor student who has "been refused admission 
to the degree program (#1) "but who wishes to show that he is indeed 
capable of doing degree program work* 

Policy with Reg ard to A dmission o f Student $1 

The necessary application materials will be circulated to the Graduate 
Staff of the School acting as a Committee of the whole. Each staff member 
will independently register his vote, with remarks as desired, and submit 
his ballot to the Secretary before passing the materials on. A favorable 
vote of 2/3 of all of thc?e voting will be required for admission to a degree 
program. In cases of a close vote or cases where pertinent information is 
later received the application may be taken to a meeting of the School for 
discussion and, if desired, further voting by the Graduate Staff. 

Policy with Regard to Admission of Stud ent #2 

This student may be admitted to graduate work as a Special Graduate 
Student upon submission of evidence that he has an acceptable undergraduate 
degree. So long as his work is of good quality he may take up to the Univer- 
sity maximum of fifteen semester hours. If at any time during the process, 
or afterward, the student decides to apply for admission to the degree program 
the procedure outlined under #1 should be followed. If he is then accepted 
in the degree program, he, may be permitted to transfer up to six credits 
taken under the i/2 program to his #1 degree program provided that permission 
is granted 'by his adviser. 

Policy with Regard to Ad miss ion of Student $3 

This student may be admitted to graduate work as a Special Graduate 
Student. So long as his work is of good quality he may take up to the Univer- 
sity maximum of fifteen semester hours. His work must be taken in courses 
numbered in the 100 8 s unless special dispensation is granted by the School. 
The student may reapply for admission to program #1 after he has passed with 
a grade of B or bettor courses taught by three different staff members of the 
School. His reapplieation must follow the procedure outlined, under Stud.ent #1. 
If he is accepted in the degree program and. assigned a graduate program, he 
may not transfer any of the credits taken under the #3 program to his program 
contract in #1. 



*"" 3 "* 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Students with a Bachelor Degree who wish to "bo admitted to the Graduate 
Degree Program should apply to the Graduate School several weeks before regis- 
tration. They will provide the Graduate School v/ith the completed application 
form, a transcript of all undergraduate work, and two letters of reoommendation 
from former instructors • The Admissions Committees of the School of Education 
and of the Graduate School will evaluate the applications and the student will 
be informed of their action. 

If the student is accepted to the Graduate School he should report to the 
Dean of the School of Education for a discussion of his plans for graduate work. 
He will be assigned to a Faculty Adviser who, v/ith the student, will work out a 
program of courses to meet the student's objectives, and v/ho v/ill act as Adviser 
to the student for his entire program. Details of procedures regarding advisers 
is found in the following Policy Statement #3» 

POLICY STATE! IBiHT #3 

Policy with Regard to Staff advisers for Master's degree Candidates. 

Introductio n. The Staff believes that each candidate for a Master's degree in 
Education should have a Staff adviser from the time he enters until he receives 
his degree. It is thought that the Adviser should guide the candidate, not 
only in academic matters, but also in those broader behavioral matters that are 
so important in teaching. It is hoped that a close professional relationship 
v/ill ensue so that the candidate will feel welcome to discuss his problems 
freely. 

iPj-AsZ* Beginning February 1, 1957 a Staff adviser will be appointed for each 
candidate for the Master's degree <• The Adviser will serve during the entire 
program of the candidate in the School of Education and v/ill be responsible to 
a considerable degree for the guidance of that program and of that candidate* 

P rocedure . The following procedure v/ill be followed: 

(1) The Adviser will be appointed by the Dean, v/ith due consideration 
to the candidate's program and to the advisory load of the Staff. 

(2) The Adviser v/ill, v/ith the candidate, work out a program leading 
toward the Master's degree in the specialty chosen by the candidate. A 
copy of this program will be sent to the Dean for approval. 

(3) The Adviser will keep close watch on the progress of the candidate 



- if - 

If the candidate's work is poor the Idviser will inform the Dean with ap- 
propriate recommendation for School action, When the candidate has com- 
pleted his program, the Adviser will follow the same procedure, 

(k) The Mviser will proceed in connection with Education 200 and 
Education 201 as indicated in Policy Statement f2 a 



Training programs now available in the School of Education for the Master 
of Education Degree include the following; 



A. Professional Improvement of Elementary Teachers, 

Prerequisites : A minimum of twenty-one semester hours in such courses 
as lead toward State Certification for Teaching in Elementary Grades , in- 
cluding Practice Teaching or classroom teaching; A good general education 
is highly desirable and the School reserves the right to increase the re- 
quired semester hours of prerequisites in order to provide for it. 

Requirements: A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate work^ 

Recommended courses: 

Edo 166 Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching 

Edo 208 Teacher and School Administration 

Ed 3 215 Workshop in Curriculum 

Ed, Z^h Evaluation in Elementary School 

Ed, 257 Children ; s Literature 

Ed, 2^8 Implementing the Elementary School Program 

Ed 259 Elementary School Science 

Ed 3 265 Techniques in Remedial Reading 

Ed e 200 Problem 

Electives (6-15). Fifteen hours may be taken in general ediica- 
tion courses such as social psychology 9 cultural anthropology, liter- 
ature, history, philosophy, mathematics or science* 



- 5 - 

B. Elementary School Principal or Supervisor, 

Prerequisites: A minimum of twenty-one semester hours in such courses 
as lead toward State Certification for Teaching in Elementary Grades. At 
least three years of elementary school teaching is highly desirable. A 
good general education is also highly desirable and the School reserves 
the right to increase the required semester hours of prerequisites in order 
to provide for it. 

Requirements: A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate work. 

Recommended courses: 

Ed,, 166 Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching 

Ed, 211 Community Relations for School Personnel 

Ed, 213 Administering Elementary Schools 

Ed. 214 Principles of Supervision 

Ed, 220 School Laws of Massachusetts 

Ed. 25^ Evaluation in Elemental School 

Ed. 265 Techniques of Remedial Reading 

Edo 284- The Junior High School 

Edo 289 Cooperative Curriculum Flanning 

Ed. 291 Educational Research 

Ed, 200 or 201 Problem or Field Study 

Electives (5-7) in further professional courses or in general 
education. The student may be reouired to take Ed. 201 Field Study 
in order to obtain practical skills in administration or supervision „ 



C, Professional Improvement of Secondary Teachers. 

Prerequisites: A minimum of fifteen semester hours in such courses 
as lead toward State Certification for Teaching in Secondary Schools, in- 
cluding Practice Teaching or classroom teaching,, A good general education 
is highly desirable as well as a strong concentration in at least one 
teaching field and the School reserves the right to increase the required 
semester hours of prerequisites in order to provide for them,. 

Requirements: A minimum of thirty semester hours in graduate work* 

Recommended courses: 

Ed. 166 Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching 
Ed e 208 Teacher and School Administration 
Ed. 215 Workshop in Curriculum 
Ed« 215 Workshop in Methods 
Ed, 284 The Junior High School 
Ed. 289 Cooperative Curriculum Planning 
Psych.. 193 Adolescent Psychology 
Ed. 200 or 201 Problem or Practicum 

Electives (9-15) • Fifteen hours may be taken in general educa- 
tion and the student's teaching field. 






}.. 



- 6 - 
D e Secondary School Principal or Supervisor 

Prerequisites j A minimum of fifteen .semester hours in such courses as 
lead toward State Certification for Teaching in Secondary Schools, At 
least three years of secondary school teaching in which the student has 
shown evidence of leadership qualities is highly desirable,, A good general 
education is also highly desirable and the School reserves the right to 
increase the required semester hours of prerequisites in order to provide 
for it e 

Requirements: A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate work. 

Recommended courses: 

Ed . 166 Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching 

Ed. 209 Administering Secondary Schools 

Ed. 210 Administering Extra Curriculum 

Ed. 211 Community Relations for School Personnel 

Ed 6 21*+ Principles of Supervision 

Ed. 220 School Laws of Massachusetts 

Ed. 28*+ The Junior High School 

Ed. 289 Cooperative Curriculum Planning 

Ed. 291 Educational Research 

Ed. 200 or 201 Problem or Practicum 

Electives (3*9) in further professional courses or in general 
education* The student may be required to take Ed, 201 Practicum 
order to obtain practical skills in administration or supervision- 



1 -n 



E« xAudio-Visual Director or Administrator. 

Prerequisites : A minimum of fifteen semester hours in such courses 
as lead toward State Certification for Teaching in either Elementary or 
Secondary Schools.-, At least three years of successful teaching in which 
the student has shown evidence of leadership qualities is highly desirable. 
A good general education is also highly desirable and the School reserves 
the right to increase the required semester hours of prerequisites in ordes* 
to provide for it. 

Requirements: A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate work,, 

Recommended courses : 

Ed, 160 Elementary School Curriculum 

Ed. 166 Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching 

Ed. 188 Secondary School Curriculum 

Ed e 209 Administering Secondary Schools 

Ed. 211 Community Relations for School Personnel 

Ed. 214 Principles of Supervision 

Ed. 215 Vorkshop in Audio-Visual Aids 

Ed. 267 Preparation of Audio-Visual Materials 

Ed. 268 Administration of Audio-Visual Programs 

Ed. 200 or 201 Problem or Practicum 

Electives (3-9) in further professional work or in general educa- 
tion. The student may be required to take Ed. 201 Practicum in order 
to obtain practical skills in audio-visual work. 



- 7- 
In all graduate programs for the Master of Education degree the student 
must schedule either Education 200 Problem or Education 201 Field Study. 
Details of procedure regarding these courses is found in the following Policy 
Statement #2. 

POLICY STATSMEITT #2 

Policy with Regard to Education 200 Problem and Education 201 Field Study. 

Introduction . The Staff of the School of Education considers the working of a 
final project and the writing of a careful report a worthwhile educational ex- 
perience. It requires initiative in planning, carrying through, and evaluating 
the project, and it requires care in the collection, classification, and inter- 
pretation of data — all valid objectives in a graduate program leading toward 
the Master *s degree. 

Policy . Beginning February 1, 1957 all candidates for the Master's degree in 
Education (except the Master of .Arts in Teaching) will be required to take 
either Education 200 or Education 201. 

Procedure . The following procedures will be followed? 

(1) Decision as to whether the candidate will take Education 200 or 
Education 201 should be made by the Adviser and candidate as early as 
possible, preferably when the program planning is being done* 

(2) As soon as the candidate has made progress in the choice of his 
project and it is tentatively acceptable to his Adviser, the Adviser will 
in consultation with the Dean suggest another member of the Staff of the 
School to be c->~ad.viser* 

(3) The candidate will prepare an outline of his project. 

(4) VJhen the outline uf the project is acceptable to both Adviser and 
Co-adviser it will 'be duplicated, a copy presented to each member of the 
Graduate Staff of the School 8 and a request made to the Dean £or a Staff 
meeting for discussion and action. 

(5) If the project is approved by at least a two-third vote of those 
attending the Graduate Staff meeting, the project will continue under jLj 
supervision of the Adviser and Co-adviser until finished, the repor-.; 
written, bound in three copies, and approved by both Advisers. In eases 
where the two advisers differ in their evaluation, the Dean will cast a 
deciding vote. 

(6) The Adviser and Co-adv.lser will then in consultation with the 
Dean set a time for an Oral Presentation of the project by the candidate 
and invite interested Staff to attend* 

(7) The adviser and co-adviser will determine the grade to be given 
the project with the Dean deciding in case of difference of evaluation. 



- 8 - 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 



For highly qualified students from Liberal Arts Colleges who have had no pro- 
fessional work in Education, 

Prerequi site s : High Scholarship in a broad general education under- 
graduate program for elementary teaching plus a strong concentration in a 
teaching field for secondary school teaching. The teaching field will be 
evaluated by that department in the College of Arts and Sciences, 

Requirements t A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate work 
for secondary school teaching, of which eighteen hours will be in the 
School of Education and twelve (at least 6 in 200 courses) semester hours 
in the College of Arts and Sciences, A minimum of thirty-six semester 
hours of graduate work for elementary school teaching, of which twenty- 
four will be in the School of Education and twelve (at least 6 in 200 
courses) semester hours in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Recommended courses in Education: 

For secondary school teaching 

Ed, 151 History of Education 

Ed, 152 Principles of Teaching 

Ed, 185 Practice Teaching 

Ed. 188 Secondary School Curriculum 

Psych. I56 Educational Psychology 



For elementary school teaching 

Ed 151 History of Education 

Ed 16^ Principles of Elementary Education 

Ed. 160 Elementary School Curriculum 

Ed. 161 Elementary School Reading 

Ed. 162 Elementary School Arithmetic 

Ed. 185 Practice Teaching 

Psych. 19^ Child Psychology 



mfmmwmm <m certain vmsmms &m activities 

1. It is racosassssded that the present fce^ar&Banta of Possology, 
Floriculture* and Olericulture in the College o£ Agriculture bo brought together 

as a Bej3arfc2an£ of Horticulture and that Professor Arthur P. French, now Head 
of the Department of Poysology, b® oased Bead of this new department effective 
October 1, 1957. 

'.Shis proposal has beam under discussion ror the past four years sad too 
believe It will strengthen the university's position la the field of Horticulture. 
In the Ios& sua it should be possible to ssalte considerable savings sad to develop 
a raore effective curriculum in these subject ©atter areas. 

This caaage can be isude without the creation of ass? positions* 

2. It is reccsasBaded that she following activities be brought together 
into a Saoartmnt of Entomology and Plant Protection in the College of Agriculture. 

a. Bepartraent of Entomology 

b. Shade Tree Laboratory 

c. Seed Laboratory 

d. Arboriculture (net? in the Beat, of landscape Architecture) 

e. Plant Pathology (now In Botany) 

g. All nfflxsibera of the Ssperlssent Station and Extension staffs 
having prisa&ry responsibility as plant ^athologiats or 
botanists. 

The proposed tmt depavtosae will have responsibilities for the in- 
struction research and eftteaslea progress in Entoaelogy, Plant Pathology and 
other inh&ses of plant protection. It is recomendad that those proposals be 
sse.de effective Geneves the dspastasat head for the saw deporteeat has h&&n ®a* 
lected and arrived for ^.t^, sse additional positions are required to effect 
the change. 

3. It is reeosssnded that the courses in Art ? mm offered In the Be- 
pertinent of Landscape Architecture in the College of Agriculture be transferred 
to the College o£ Arts and Science as soon as the President is convinced that 
the change can be made effectively. It is understood that tihea the change ia 
mads j, the present personnel in Landscape Architecture *iho conduct Art courses 
©ill be transferred to the College e£ Arts and Science. 



DEGRESS AWARDED SEPTEMBER 1957 

College of Arts and Science 

Bachelor of Arts 

Lawrence Gene Blakley Robert 0»Donnell 

James William Cauger, Jr. Peter Day Proud 

Edward Alonza Cooper (owes fine) Arthur Henry Hall Rapoza 

Alwyn Geoffrey Cormier Mary Lovett Shea 

Ellen Grace Porgey Francis Theodore Spriggs 

Dorothy Mary Matuszko Goclowski* Frederick Gilbert Taylor 

Kenneth David MacRae Christopher Henry Thacher (fine) 

Ronald Ellsworth Matheson (owes loan) Richard Arnold Wright 

Alice L, 0»Connor Joseph J. Zayac 

* As of June 3, 1957 Bachelor of Science 

Magna Cum Laude 
Anne War dwell 

Cum Laude 
Eileen Rose Belloli 

Rite 

Richard Douglas Carey Weston Eayrs 3rd. 

William Curtis Desmond Jr. Roderick Angus MacLeod 

Charles Edw?rd Drake, Jr. Daniel J. 0»Connell 

Edmund Christian Tarnuszer 

College of Agriculture 
Bachelor of Science 

James Richard Bowers Robert Duckworth 

John Wilson Edgar 

School of Business Administration 
Bachelor of Business Administration 

Ronald Albert Lucas 
Carl Henry Berg Bruce 0. Lindbom 

Neil Robert Callahan Richard Donald Makela 

Kevin John Donnellan Charles B. Niedzwiecki 

Kenneth Alvin Ferris Robert Crane Root 

Richard Paul Sears 

School of Engineering 
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
Louis Joseph Montesi John Edward Murtagh 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Roger G. Arguin Vincent 0. Zucco 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Douglas Alden Howard Charles Raymond Kittles 

Richard Daniel Silverman 



UNIVERSITY OF IiASSACHUSETTS 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 
FALL, 19S7 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Dolores Loretta A. Bergeron 
Achilles Bertrand 
Mary Cawley Bieber 
James Frederick Boldway 
Bernard W. Bourdeau 
Roland Thomas Brown 
Marion Childs 
Jean Couture . 
Lloyd Stanton Dale 
James Harold David 
Ellen Catherine Healy 
Donald John Johnson 
Alexander Scott Johnston 
Paul Andrew Jolicoeur 
Russell Edward KLdd 
George Ashley Matthews, Jr # 
James Hervey Miller 
Edward Charles Paszek 
Madeline M, Ryan 
Jjaaeph^Xee- Sannella 
Mary Frances Shanahan 
Lewis Austin Smith 
Mary Ann Kozak Spakowski 
James Planning Stoughton 
Benjamin Weiner 
Jane Allen Weiner 



Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Physical Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Entomology 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Chemistry 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 

Education 



Mary Griffin Powers 
Evelyn Hall Russell 



MASTER OF ARTS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
Clayton Stuart Bradford 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Sociology 
Zoology 



Charles Lewis Goldman 
Richard Field Jackson 
Anand Gopinath Naik-Kurade 



Bacteriology 
Food Technology 
Food Technology 



September h, 19!>7 



II 



Approved by Executive Cosgaifctee - Needs ratification by Board 

APFOIKTMBKTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

Albert So Anthony, Associate Professor of Secondary Education, 
effective Septec&er I, 1957 at $6708 per year (3 steps above 
sdniflnm)o B.S. Trinity; A.M.T. Harvard; D.Ed* Harvard. Be is 
currently Academic Dean of American International College,, 

J, T. Clayton, Associate Professor "A" Agricultural Engineering, 
effective September 15, 1957 at $8372 per year (5 steps above 
ainiosim). BoS. in Agricultural Engineering University of Tennessee; 
K.S. in Agricultural Engineering University of Illinois . Currently 
employed in the Department of Agricultural Engineering at the 
University of Illinois » 

Charles A. Herald, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $5538 per year (2 steps above minisufiO . 
B« S and Ho So Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia* Currently 
is Assistant Professor at the California State Polytechnic College. 

Co Eo Hunter, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1957 at $6006 per year (4 steps above lalnis&aB). B.S C in 
Mo So Carnegie Institute of Technology „ At present he is with Convair 
Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation of Fort Worth, Texas « 

Theodore W» Lead, Associate Professor "A" Agricultural Economics, 
effective December 1, 1957 at $8,372 per year (5 steps above tainisma). 
Bo So, K.S« and Ph,D« Ohio State University,, Currently alloyed in 
Extension Service at Ohio State University. 

Harjorie M. Merchant, Assistant Professor "A", Extension Specialist in 
Consumer Education, effective September 15, 1957 at $6435 per year 
(2 steps above tainisuaOo B.S. University of Maine; M.S. Pennsylvania 
State University o She is now ccsplcyed as a Specialist in Consumer 
Food Marketing with the Regional Extension Marketing Education Program 

Joseph Ho 0* Byrne, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
effective September 1, 195? at $6006 per year (4 steps above sainifsasa) « 
B.So in H.E. University of Cincinnati; M«So in M.Eo University of 
Kentucky. At present he is supervisor of the Hydrodynamics Section of 
the Advanced Reactor Design Group with the nuclear engine project of 
Pratt and Whitney Aircraft „ 



J 



EXTKA COfPEKSATIOa 

Louis Ac Carpino, Assistant Professor "A" of Chesaistry under 
O S, Away contract from June 3, If 5? to August 31, 1957 at 
$113 u 25 per ws«ko 

Ho To u\ Smith, Head of Dapartaent of Geology under Naval Research 
Contract from July 1, 1957 to August 9, 1957 at $164.75 par week 
or $98Sc50o 

Richard S* Stela* Associate Professor M A" of Cheeistry under U* S* 
Mavy contract £ros» June 3, 1957 to September 3 9 1957 at $149 . 00 
par tttek< 

John So Foster, Asst- Prof * "A" of Agrie. Econeaslcs for $113.25 par 
tseek frost Federal feeds for the period July 30 through August 28, 1957. 

CORR ECTION IN SUMMER EHFiJOYKBfrT 

Bronislaw M c Koaigb@rg 8 Assistant Professor of Zoology under Public 
Health Grant E-742C2 from June 17, 1957 to August 17, 1957 at 
$136,66 per week. (Previously approved at $120 . 00 per iseek). 

In place of B&jmmx Budin, Beparfcissnfc of English , tsfeo tsss approved 
for the period July 1 to August 10, 195? on a 50 percent teaching 

basis, us© reeojnend Assistant Professor Donald Sears (non-university 
faculty m®fo®*) be approved as the repl&eesesnt on a 50 percent basis 
during the above periodo His rate of conp©as&ti©a should be $63.37 
par neek or $380*22 for the sin wekSc 



APPOXinMBOTS 



Isaac C P Csus&er,, Instructor "A" Food Technology (half -tine) , 

effective July 1, 1957 at $2535 per year. 



SAUSf ADJOSTHEHf 



Willis» Co Starkweather, Begistsar 8 s Office, from Instructor "A" 

to Assistant Registrar, grade 13, effective July 1, 1957 at annual 
salary of $5,525 (4 steps above «iniassis)o 



t 



SEIHSTATHflHt 



Otto Pc Pf lease. Assistant Professor in History effective September 1, 
1957 at $6006 per year (4 steps above ain&nssOo He has been working 
in Gerasny on a study of Bisaarcko 



UNIVERSITY 0? IfaSSACHUSElTS 
Memorandum 

From: Msrit ?. Khit©, Civil Engineering Date: August 12, 1957 

To: President Mather (with copies to Provost end bean of Engineering). 

Subject: Request approval of part-time employment of teaching staff on 
Project AF 33 (600) -35001 

Project AF 33 (600) -35001 has employed four faculty members practically 
full-time since 8 July 1957. Full-time work by three ©en will continue until . 
6 September 1957. 

The total amount of the contract is about $17, SCO of which about $15,000 - 
$16,000 will be available for salaries. Up to 6 September only about $5,500 will 
have been paid out. 

The work being done in this project is quite specialised. (It involves 
determining the resistance of structures to blast loads*) Men capable of handling 
this type of work well are rare and in considerable demand. The persons now em- 
ployed are experienced and are perfectly satisfactory* 

Unless it will be possible to employ msEbers of the teaching staff part- 
ties on this project during the coming academic year, work will have to be suspended 
from 6 September until 1 June 1953. Since the contract is due to expire on 20 June 
1958 it will be difficult to accomplish sore than a fraction of what is expected or 
to utilise sore than a small part of the funds made available,, It is possible, of 
course, to request an est ens ions however the sponsor is rather anxious to have the 
results of this work in a reasonable time* 

Therefore, it is requested that permission be given to ©mpioy certain members 
of the teaching faculty on this project during the academic year 1957-53 with extra 
compensation at the rate of 1 /200th current annual teaching salaries per day of work. 
Time so spent would be limited to one day per week when classes are in session plus 
a reasonable fraction of vacation time (the mount depending on what University work 
is required during vacation). 

On this basis it is expected that the nasiaam time that might be spent by a 
man on this project would be as follows: 

Hhile University is in session 30 days 

During academic holidays 20 " 

June 1958 15 " Total 65 days 

The corresponding expenditure in salaries for this work would be about 
$10,000 if all persons now on the project work the maximum possible. This, combined 
with the amount spent, during summer 1957 will equal the total available. 

Persons it is desired to employ: Frederick Osialo - Instructor 

Thomas A. Grow - assistant Professor 

Elmer C. Osgood - Professor 

Merit P. f&ite - Department Bead 

hi Merit P. finite* Head of Dept. 



1 



I 



Assmmm to u mms' mm 



It is sfocssE&a&fctt that the goileving aasahess 
sou sereins on the ecscssaic year besls be 
salary adjusted accordingly, effective 



o£ the psofessiosaal ©to££ 
assigned to asaual basis with 
i» 1957. 



SargSBt Eussell 

Louis II. Bahe? 

( David A, Bvaas <%) 
( (Veeaat) (%) 

Sv^reca (vacancy) 

J. H. FOStex 
G. S. Sisg^ 
F, S. Potter 



&• S. Bead 



Laa&ert-Ott 



R. A. gouthsriek 



To 



Eceseieics Assoc. Prof. Assoc, Pre£. "A" 



Daisy & Asu Sci. Asat Prof. Asst. Prof . "A" 



Baisy & An. Sci. 
Dairy & An. Sci. 



Asst. Prof. Asst. Profi. "A 1 
Asst* Pro*. Asst. Pre*. "A" 



. Pzo£. Asst. Prof, "A" 



Agric* Scoosia&es Asato Pvo£. Asst. Prof., "A" 



S<e&d«. Arehe 



Asst* Prof. Assfc* Pro*. M A n 



Is An. Sci. Asst* Prof. Asst, Pro£* "A" 



Fsrof* Asst* Px©£. **A" 

X&efcstgctei? Znstsvctwr *'A" 

XmstKector tats&ctor W A M 

Xcstrnctor Xsetsueto? "A" 



Aztxsoal 
Sa lary 

$8960 

6708 

3081 (%> 
21&4.50 (%) 

9889 



7527* 
6435 



5U70 
$772 



Vassal date of step-sete iacresse 
seeemaeadad that the Trustees 
abo^a so that etegc from ecedsaie 
coincide «gith the opesis^ of the 



oa these three isea is 10/6. It is 
the siilesy increases ss listed 

to calendar yaisse st&ttsa will 



POLICY CLEARANCE - EASTEEH COLLEGE ATHLETIC CQRFEKEKCE 



I. (IV. B.C.A.C.) With reference to statement of principles end policies 
for the conduct of intercollegiate athletics as stated on pages 36, 37, 
and 38 of the current E.C.A.C. Manual: 

a. Financial aid in the fores of grants recommended by sub- 
committee of the University Athletic Council will be made 
to sub-committee of the University Scholarship Cosmitteo, 
who will approve such grants on the ease basis that aid is 
granted to all University students ,» 

b. The Chairman of the University Scholarship Committee shall 
give the recipient a written statement of the atsmnt, 
duration, conditions and tanas thereof. 

c» Evidence of need will be established by the C.S.S. initiated 
by parents or guardian of the prospective grant- ia-aid 
recipient at the tasae that formal application is made. Such 
inf onset ion will be processed by the Chairman of the Univer- 
sity Scholarship Cesasittea and he alone will determine the 
applicant's qualification for such financial assistance. 

II. (V. E.C.&.C.) Recruitment or high school contact program will be de- 
veloped through the use of school committees of various alumni chapters 
throughout the country. 

III. Sources of grants-in-aid: 

a. Proceeds from concession operation administered by the 

University on University campus. 

b, Existing scholarships or grants-in-aid awards, such as 
military scholarships, etc. 

c. Endowment fund of the University. 

d, Alumni contributions which will be administered by the 
University Treasurer under appropriate grants-in-aid funds 
listed in our catalogue as George H. Barber Fund. 



J 



UOTBRSXTY Of MASSACHUSETTS 

From; Treasurer, Kenneth Wo Johnson Dates September 24, 1957 

To z Board of Trustees 

Subject: 1, Use of Income from Overhead on Research Grants 

2o Use of Interest earned on Trust and Agency Funds 
on deposit in Savings Banks 

This memorandum is being sent to all Trustees for their information 
prior to the meeting on September 30, 1957 

Section 5a of Chapter 75 of the General Laws authorizes the Trustees 
to operate certain student activities as revolving funds . Section 7 of Chapter 

75 of the General Laws authorizes the Trustees to administer trusts, grants, 
gifts, etc, These funds 'are classified on the books of the University as: 

lo Endowment Funds - those funds held by the Trustees 
where the principal of the fund is maintained in perpetuity 
and the iueoma only used for the purposes specified in the 
original gift or bequest. 

Trust Funds - those funds the principal of which is 
held in trust and used for the purpose designated in the 
trust agreement or other authorization. 

3, Agency Funds - those funds for which the Treasurer 

acts as custodian but which are not for the use of the 

University, 

Bach of these funds is further classified into type of activity or 
purpose. Foe. sxastple,. the 175 Trust Fund accounts may be grouped into; 

1. Federal Funds 

2, Student Loan Funds 
3 = Scholarship Funds 

4= General Trust Funds 

5» Research Funds 

6o Research Funds - Federal Grants 

Ail of these funds are completely separate from state appropriated funds 
and are administered and accounted for under the statutory authority cited 
above . Tfe(?j are the "private" funds of the Trustees in the sense that they are 
not stats appropriations and are not, except for state audit, subject to state 
administrative control or regulation. 

la Use of Income from Overhead on Research Grants 

During the last five years (fiscal 1952-1957) gifts and grants to 
the University £or sponsored research increased from $68,626,17 in 195.2 to 
§258, 746 . 95 in 1957 . Many of these grants include a sum to help defray the 



I 



I 



.2- 



administrative and overhead costs of handling the research. At first, when the 
activity was small, this overhead sura was left in the project budget for use 
of the scientist in furthering hin research . During the past two years, with 
increased activity, this overhead has been placed in a separate account and 
used (where state funds had previously been used) to support other teachers on 
research projects under a program known as "Teachers Research". This program 
was initially started by President Van Meter with state funds and is now wholly 
supported by private funds „ During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957, 
$8,801,00 of overhead eoney was allocated to Teachers Research. In addition 
there was a balance at the end of the year of $7,526.60 in the overhead account. 
This has net; increased to over $16,000 and will continue to increase as more 
grants come in. 

This sponsored research should not be confused with the annual state 
appropriation for reimbursable contractual research with the Federal Government 

which is administered and accounted for in the same manner as all other state 
funds o 

To further the research program of the University and to stimulate addi« 
tional research, it is 

Recommended: That income from overhead received on 

trust fund sponsored research be used 
to promote and support additional 
research, including the employment of 
necessary personnel. 



2. Use of Interest earned on Trust and Agency 
Funds on deposit in Savings Banks 

On Kay 14, 1952, the Trustees 

Voted: That the Treasurer with the advice and eon°» 

sent of the Chairman of the Finance Committee 
be authorized to invest balances in the 
Trust and agency funds of the University in 
short* term 0. S. Treasury Kotes and Certifi- 
cates, Certificates of Deposit, or short* 
term notes of the Commercial Credit Company 
when it appears that the total of all such 
Trust and Agency Funds exceed current demands 
on the funds. Any Income derived from such 
investment shall be credited to the "Trust 
Fund Interest" account tmd be available for 
use in accordance with the policy for using 
other unearmarked trust fund income. 

In accordance with sound accounting practice as used at many other 
colleges and universities, the income from Trust and Agency funds (except 
Federal Funds) is carried in one trust fund checking account in The First 
National Bank of Amherst. Whenever the cash balance in this account becomes 



I 



larger than the immediate needs, the surplus t« deposited in Savings Banks 
where it earns interest. In accordance with the vote of the Trustees cited 
above, the interest is placed in the "Trust Fund Interest" account and disbursed 
on authorization of the Trustees. 

There is no requirement that this interest be credited to any of the 
accounts from which the money came. Other reputable universities handle their 
surplus cash in the same manner, the theory being that the management of these 
funds is a service function that is performed without cost to the participating 
agencies and activities. Any interest earned through good management should 
be available for unrestricted use. 

It should' be noted that these funds are completely separate from the 
Endowment Funds that ara accounted for separately and under different policies „ 
They are> of course, separate from state funds and are not subject to state 
administrative control or regulation other than state audit. 



things : 



To date, this interest has been used on vote of the Trustees for tw© 



1, Cover cash variances of the tellers 

2 , Scholarships 



I 



At present there is a free unrestricted balance of $5,509.33 in this 
account. More will be added during the year. (Already $7,000.00 has been 

authorized for scholarships this year.) 

sossseudeds That the President be authorized to 
use $5,000„00 of the unrestricted 
funds in the Trust Fund Interest 
account for grants-in-aid to students. 



Land Conveyance - ftalthan 

RecoEmended: That wider the authority of Chapter 538 of the Act© 
of 1957 » throe parcels of load at the K&ltham Field 
Station, as described in a deed of conveyance esecuted 
this date by ska Trustees » be conveyed to the County of 
Hlddleses for the purpose of widenic@ and relocating 
Beaver Street in ftslthaia. 



Securities Purchase 

Eoccmessded: Purchase of securities as receimeaded by the Finance 
Cooaittee* 



t 



Aggosnacaggs 



John B. Beam, Instructor "A" (% time) in Dairy & Animal Science, 
effective Septeniber l t 1957 at $2535 per year. 

Thomas j„ Becker, Instructor in Economics., effective Sep tester 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

Sober t A. Bieber, Instructor "A" <% tte) in Agricultural Economies, 
effective September I, 1957 at $2535 per year. 

Ernest H. Buck, Assistant Professor "A" of Dairy & Anteal Science, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $5889 per year. 

Elisabeth A. Clarke, Instructor in Mursing, effective September 3 S 1957 

at ^SS=- S~aj?c 

Warren L» Comsteck, Instructor "A * <% tisse) in Dairy & Animal Science, 
effective September 3, 1957 at $§m per year* 

Arthur D ! Antonio, Instructor in Economies, effective September 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

William Seminoff , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year* 

Francis Driscoll, Instructor "A" (% tisse) in Agricultural Economics, 
effective Septeafeer 1, 1957 at $2535 post year. 

Fred Femich, Instructor 8 *A" (% time) in Miry & Animal Science, 
effective August 1, 1957 at $2535 per year* 

Janet Fietsa©, Instructor in Home Economics, effective September 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

Robert A. Gessert, Assistant Professor (% time) in Electrical Engineering, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $2535 per year. 

John B. Ealsted, Visiting Lecturer in History (1/3 tima) 9 effective 
Septes&er I, 1957 at $1438*66 per year. 

Mrs. &o£s S. Harris, Instructor (% time) in ©erman, effective 
September 1, 1957 at $S€5 per year* 

Christopher ?• Kanti&ais, Instructor {% tisse) in landscape Architecture, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $21 58 per year* 

Donald E. Lasfeert, Instructor (% tisaa) in Food Teetsnology, effective 

Septeiafe?>r 1, 1957 at $2158 per year. 

Frank l^ndenfe!©*, Instructor in Sociology, effective September 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

Curtis Kessinger, Instructor <% time) in Geology, effective September 1, 195? 
at $2158 per year, 

I&si* Christian© Es&ler* tetructor; (% time) 3a <0fis&ao, @£ £ ©ceiv© 
September 1, 1957 at $2153 per year. 



APPOIHIHBHTS -2 

Robert W. Murray, Instructor "A" {% time) in Dairy & Aninal Science 9 
effective September I, 1957 at $2535 per year. 

Mrs* Eleanor L» EJiedeck 9 Instructor in §peech 9 effective September 1, 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

Thomas H 9 0tt 9 Instructor (% tine) in Food Technology » effective 
Septessker 1, 1957 at $2158 per year. 

Orlo A. Powell 9 Instructor {% tine) in tfeehanieal Engineering, 
effective Sep tester 1, 1957 at $2158 per year. 

Charles Eobertson 9 Instructor (3/4 tine) in C&vemncat for tae falls 
semester, effective Septe^er 1, 1957 at $1618. so 

Id&ia C. Eoa^sacj ?£sittas lecturer in History {1/3 tine) effective 
Septes&er 1 9 1957 at $1433.66 per year. 

Marion Sonnenfeld, Instructor (% tine) in German, effective 
September l 9 1957 at $2158 per year. 

Marc J, Smarts 9 Instructor in Sociology 9 effective Sep tester 1 9 1957 
at $4316 per year. 

John L Teall 9 Visiting Lecturer in History {1/3 tine) effective 
Septesijer 1, 1957 at $1438.66 per year. 

Mrs. Harjorle F. Sullivan, Instructor (% tine) in Bone Economics* 
effective Septenber 1 9 1957 at $^i# per year. 



APgQB&%E33TS ABOVE MBgXMCM 

Frank H« BeFtKppea,, Instructor in Physics, effective September I, 1957 
at $5143 per year (4 steps above reintimsn)* B.S. , Brown University; 
Hi. D. , Yale* Has recently been Research Associate with John A* Hartford 
Research Laboratory, Valhalla, Hew Yorli. 

Mrs. Jane D. fteid, Instructor in English, effective Septes&er 1 8 1957 
at $2262 (% tine) (1 step above mlniisasa). B.A., University of Louisville; 
M»A» » Smith College. Has recently Instructor in English at Sweet Brier 



F. Mies Sawyer, Assistant Professor "A" Food Technology, effective 
October 15, 1957 at $6435 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. from 
HaI T. ; M S. g tfniversifcy of California. 



mestct XBCBSASSS 



iJ» i <» a i 'W i W » 



Job:* S« Harris, Professor of Gyvermeae, effective $epfcea&ar 1, 1957 
froa $7124 to f©060 {4 steps above miaiaajBs) 

Arthur S« Kiedeck, Professor of Speech , effective September 1, 1957 
fro© $3372 Co $8684 (isasisaKB) 

Petes Heller, Associate Professor of Cesasaii 9 effective September 1, 1957 
from $67 OS to $7254 (5 steps above missaaam) 

George Eidsason, Associate Professor of €hemistsy» effective September t 9 1957 
froa $6708 to $7254 (5 steps above ejisatasa) 

Eichard S. Steio 5 Associate Professor of Cacssistry, effective Septoa&er 1, 1957 
frota $6435 to $6981 (4 steps above w*Mmjm) 

Harold G, Vo-tter 9 Associate Processor of SeonesBics, effective Septes&er 1, 1957 
frosa $5839 to $6703 (3 steps above as&aiwKs) 

Raysooa 4 JJyssan, Associate Professor of E^ucatioa, effective Septes&e? 1, 1957 

froia $6708 to $7254 (5 steps above diiaisaaa) 

Si&i&y Kaplan, Assistant Professor of English, effective Sep tester 1, 1957 

fros $6006 to $6474 Cistern) 

Harry W. Sodge 9 Jr., Bsstructor la Geology, effective September 1, 1957 

from $431.6 to $4732 (2 steps above ssdntaaa) 

Arnold Levins, Snstrustor in Sociology, effective Septeasber 1, 1957 

fro© $4316 to $4524 

John G. Sfoser, abstractor la Zoology, ef festive Septerker 1, 1957 
fro® $4732 to $5564 (wmtoaam) 



Uilliosa 3. Essclea from Professor "A" Food Eechnology Co Head of Deportment "A" 
Food Technology, effective* October 6 S $957 at $10,582 (6 stops above Einismsia) 

Dorothy Davis free Assistant Professor of Kotaa Economics to Associate 
Prof essor of Heme Econesics, effective September 1, 1957 at $67 OS 
(3 steps above mtxtimm). 

Seymour Epstein from Assistant Professor of Psychology to Associate 
Professor of Psychology, effective Septess&er 1, 1957 » % tisse from 
state reads at $308! and % ties© at the Worcester Youth Guidance 
Center at §4000 from grant of the Hatioaai Institute of Mental Health* 

Tsuan Eus Fens f srom Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering , effective Septen&er I, 1937 
at $6708 (3 steps above s&nisiuEi) 

Thomas Grot? from Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering to Associate 
Professor of Civil Engineering, effective Septes&er I, 1957 at $6708 
(3 steps above minimum) 

Helen P. ©' £eesy , from Assistant Professor of Education to Associate 
Professor of Education, effective SepteE&er l s 1957 at $6162 < 1 stop 
above aiadessn) 

Jay E Trover from' Assistant Professor of Seology to Associate Professor 

of Zoology, effective Septes&er 1, 1957 at $$931 (5 steps above mintem) 

Gerard Braunthal > from Instructor in Government to Assistant Professor 

of Government, effective Sep tester 1, 1957 at $5304 <i step above ssin&sam) 

Eichsrd H. Broun from- Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of 

History, effective September I, 1957 at $5304 (1 step above m&zilmm) 

Edtsord L. B&vi© from Instructor in Botany to Assistant Professor of 
Botany, effective September 1, 1957 at $5970 

Hrs. Katharine Z». Ess-elan from % tise Instructor of Hosks Economic o to 
% tine Assistant Professor of Hosse BconcnsicQ, effective September 1, 1957 
at $2535. 

■ 

Susner M. Greenfield from Instructor in Romance languages to Assistant 
Professor of Sotsssce Languages, effective Septeeibe? I, 1957 at $5772 
(3 steps above ©intern) 

Richard D. Harper from Instructor in Speech to Assistant Professor of 

Speech, effective Septes§>er I, 1957 at $5772 (3 steps above minisasa) 

Alexander Hull, Jr» from Instructor in French to Assistant Professor of 
French, effective Septea&er 1, 1957 at $5304 (1 ©tea above miaitsum) 

Ales R. Page from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor of English, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $5* 



F<obert A. Potash from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of 
History, effective Sep tester 1, 1957 at $5538 (2 steps above ssinitmna) 



?IlfalBWTS 



AFPOBTOPiTS ffOR 6. B. PBOGBAM. PITTSPISLD 

Eliot 0. Allen, Associate Professor of English for first semester 
of academic year 1957-58. Two classes at $490.75 each. 

George E. Biggins, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering for first 
semester of academic year 1957*58 at $633.75. 

1st semester 
John Leahy, laboratory Instructor in Cheadstsy for$:«st 1957-58 at $359.66. 

Lyance & Littlejchn, Jr. , Instructor in Mechanical Engineering for 
first semester of acetesic year 1957-58 at $539.50. 

Louis &. Masks, Instructor in Mathematics for year 1957-58 at $359.66 
per seaseater. 

Asses S« Pierce, Instructor in History for year 1957*38 at $633.75 per 
sesester. 

1st semester 
Granville Pruyne, Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry for aaar 1957-53 
at $359.66. 

1st sesester 
Carl S. Stays* Professor of Electrical Engineering for the aaar. 1957-58 
at $851.50. 

Joseph Singer, Instructor in Chemistry for the year 1957-53 at $539.50 

per saaEester. 

Arthur B. Phinney, Jastractor in Mathematics fsr year 1957-53 at $359.66 



CQRBECYXOH 



On June 24, 1957 the Trustees -voted to appoint Mr. Koei Reahenacker as 
Assistant Athletic Coach, effective Septeaker 1, 1957 at $5*538 per year 
(2 steps above miaSmaa). It Is requested that this appointment fce changed 
to Assistant Professor at $5,533 per year { 2 steps above tainisnss). 



EHE&OT8 



Jssacs E. fuller , aesearca Professor of Bacteriology s Isseritue, 
effective *Say 1, 1957, 

Harley A. Iceland, Extension Professor of Youth Work, Emeritus, 
effective Septes&er 30, 1957. 

Eerie II* iodine. Associate Professor of Youth Work, Eseritus, 
effective Becerj&er 31, 1957. 

Miner J. Harfcuson, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineer i.ng* 
Hiseritus, effective August 31 , 195?. 

Clark L. Thayer , Processor and Head of t&e ^apartment of Floriculture, 

Bsscritus, effective August 31, 1957. 



Glean S. Tinder, Assistant Professor of Government 9 effective 
September 1, 1957 at $5306 per year. 

CHA8S8 IK STATUS 

Mrs. Georgia P. French fee transferred from Instructor "A" <©ne-taalf 
ti?se) in ESo&e Eceaossics to Instructor "A" (full tins) in Hosse Bcoaoissics, 
effective Sep tester 15, 1957. 



3SEP~RATE XRC&EaSES 



E 



to approve step- rate increases for members ©f the professional staff 
of the University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and 
payable during the sontns of September and October, 1957. 



TRUSTEE 



1983 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

November 21, 1957, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 

Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, Haigis, 
McNamara, Perry, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds, reported that on November 19 his committee voted to 
recommend that the Trustees approve plans for the faculty and 
married-student housing project and that the Trustees execute a 
land lease and a building lease with the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association for this project. 

Mr. Austin Broadhurst, representing the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association, was invited to discuss this 
project. Mr. Broadhurst showed an artist's rendering of the apart- 
ment building which will be located along Lincoln Avenue where the 
soccer field is now. The project will house 82 families. The 
authorization from the Legislature is for $1,000,000. The bond 
issue has been sold at $9,050 above par at interest rate of 3.90%. 
Low bid for construction has been received from Aquadro & Cerruti 
Inc. of Northampton. Treasurer Johnson reported that at these 
figures the apartments can be rented at rates comparable to those 
now prevailing in the University Faculty Apartments but that unlike 
University Faculty Apartments, all utilities will be provided. The 
apartments will not be furnished except for the usual kitchen 
appliances. 

Mr. Broadhurst said that representatives of the Building 
Association recently conferred with officials of the New York City 



Faculty 
Hous ing 



1984 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Regional Office of the Housing and Home Finance Agency of the 
Federal Government concerning the possibilities of purchase by 
the Federal Government under the College Housing Program, so-called, 
of Building Association bonds. At the present time the Building 
Association sells its bonds in the open market. However, the 
Federal Housing Act has recently been amended to permit associations! 
such as the University of Massachusetts Building Association to seli 
bonds to the Federal Government under the College Housing Program. 
Under such a plan, the bonds could be amortized over a period of 
40 years as against the 29 years for the bonds sold to finance the 
apartment units and the present interest rate charged under the 
College Housing Program is 37„ as against the 3.9% of this last 
issue. Mr. Broadhurst stated that as a result of this conference 
and other investigations, the Building Association members con- 
sidered that there were three major questions which should be 
taken into account before deciding whether to direct the Building 
Association to seek to obtain Federal financing, namely: (1) 
Federal bond issues cannot include furniture for dormitories which 
is provided under the present financial plan; (2) The experience 
of other colleges, particularly as to time requirements and con- 
struction costs; and (3) the impact of present administrative re- 
quirements as to the amount of rentals under Federal financing. 
Mr. Broadhurst noted that the New York City office personnel had 
stated that construction costs of dormitories financed under the 
Federal program had been a minimum of $4,000 per student as against 
$2,900 for the dormitory now under construction at the University. 
He also discussed the differences between the basis upon which 
rentals of Building Association buildings were fixed and that upon 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



1985 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



which the Federal agency insisted. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve plans for the faculty and married- 
student housing project as presented at this 
meeting. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the form of lease from The Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts to University of Massachusetts 
Building Association of a parcel of land for 
the erection of nine apartment buildings, all 
pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as 
amended or supplemented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 
390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 
1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, 
by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, by 
Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, and by Acts of 1957, 
Chapter 517, be and hereby is approved as pre- 
sented to this meeting; and that the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts, or a majority 
thereof, be and hereby are authorized, in the 
name and on behalf of The Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in or substantially in the form presented to 
this meeting, said lease of land from the Common- 
wealth to the Association and to cause the common 
seal of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the form of lease of nine apartment build- 
ings, by University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended 
or supplemented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by 
Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 1948, 
Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by 
Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, by 
Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, and by Acts of 1957, 
Chapter 517, said buildings to be erected by 
said Association on a parcel of land to be leased 
to it by the Commonwealth, be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting; and that 
the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
or a majority thereof, be and hereby are authorized 
in the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to execute, acknowledge and deliver, 
in or substantially in the form presented to this 
meeting said lease of nine apartment buildings, 
designated Housing Group No. 2, from said Associa- 
tion to the Commonwealth and to cause the common 
seal of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 



1986 



TRUSTEE 



Charles A. 
Peters Fund 



J. Clark 

Osterhout 

will 



Master Plan 
payment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, 

reported on actions of his committee taken on November 19, 1957 

and on the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it was 

VOTED : To accept with gratitude the gift of 
Dr. Charles A. Peters, Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, of 20 shares of 
common stock of the Dow Chemical Company 
and that this be established as an Endow- 
ment Fund at the cost value of the stock 
of $1,140.49 to be known as the "Charles 
A. Peters Fund" with the income to be 
used as specified in the instrument of 
gift for the unrestricted use of the 
Head of the Department of Chemistry 
for the benefit of the work of the De- 
partment of Chemistry. 

It was 

VOTED ; To sell the 40/100ths. interest in one 

share of common stock of the Dow Chemical 
Company received as a stock dividend and 
add the proceeds to the principal of the 
Charles A. Peters Fund. 

It was 

VOTED : To exercise the rights received from the 
Standard Oil Company of New Jersey using 
270 rights to purchase 9 shares of 
common stock at $44 per share, selling 
the four unused rights. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the bequest of $396.95 under 

the will of J. Clark Osterhout, class of 
1887, which stipulates that the income 
be used as grants to needy students from 
Chelmsford or the county of Middlesex. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to pay for 
the printing of the Master Plan Report, 
using $1,285.00 from the Sprague Fund 
and such other amounts as necessary not 
exceeding $200.00 from other unrestricted 
trust funds. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write off as 
uncollectible the following student loan 
with accumulated interest: 



Name 



Date of Ma turity Amount Fund 



Roy I. Martin June 14, 1948 $80.00 Goldthwait 



It was 



VOTED: 



To establish the following investment policy 
and that securities as selected at this meet- 
ing be recommended to the Trustees for purchase 

1. Liquidate approximately $90,000 savings 
bank accounts, leaving $10,000 in Amherst 
and $15,000 in Ware. 



&a t| 



3. 



Invest approximately $75,000 immediately 
in bonds of AA grade or better at 4.50% 
or better. 

The remaining $15,000 to be invested in 
stock, the selection of the stocks and 
the timing to be decided by the committee, 



It was 



4 7/8 


1993 


4 5/8 


1987 


5 


1983 


5 


1987 


5 


1987 


4 7/8 


1987 


4 7/8 


1987 


5 


1987 



1987 



Student 
Loans 



Investment 
Policy 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to purchase the 
following: 



10 bonds of New Jersey Bell Tel. deb. 

10 bonds of Philadelphia Elec. 1st 

10 bonds of American Tel. & Tel. deb. 

10 bonds of Consolidated Edison N.Y. 1st 

10 bonds of Dayton Power & Light 1st 

10 bonds of Gulf States Utilities 1st 

10 bonds of Niagara Mohawk Power Gen. 

5 bonds of Tampa Electric 1st 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to purchase 200 
shares of common stock of the Southern New 
England Telephone Company. 

Trustee Whitmore then presented the remaining recommenda- 
tions resulting from meeting of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds on November 19 and on the recommendation of this committee, 
it was 



Bonds 



1988 



TRUSTEE 

Physical Educa 
tion Playing 
Fields 



Appraisal of 
Farm Land and 
Buildings 



Science 
Center 



Dormitories 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance for appointment 
to design the Physical Education Playing 
Fields for Men the name of Gordon E. 
Ainsworth & Associates, Registered Land 
Surveyors and Civil Engineers, South 
Deerfield, Massachusetts. 

It was 

VOTED : To engage S. H. Graham, Burlington, Massa- 
chusetts, retired Civil Service Federal 
Land Bank Appraiser, to make an appraisal 
of the farm land and buildings that the 
Trustees plan to acquire under the pro- 
visions of Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of 
the Acts of 1957 which appropriated 
$150,000 for the purchase of certain land 
and buildings thereon, provided that 
Treasurer Johnson interviews Mr. Graham 
and is satisfied with him prior to employ- 
ing him. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans for the Science 
Center. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to obtain appropriate 
legislative authorization for the con- 
struction of dormitories and other housing 
on a self- liquidating basis for the needs 
of the University for the next three years, 
with a total authorization of $7,000,000. 

President Mather presented a number of personnel actions 
and answered questions relative to appointments, promotions and 
other staff questions, and it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached personnel actions. 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson discussed the 
situation which has arisen at the University because of legislative 
limitations which were applied to the establishment of the 
Barrington plan pay scale. The Barrington Associates were employed 
by the Commonwealth to establish salaries for practically all 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

positions in the Commonwealth. For the most part, their 
recommendations were good and were adopted by the Legislature and 
put into effect beginning October 1, 1956. However, the Legisla- 
ture limited the amount of increase in any one position to $1,000 
during the first year of the plan. This resulted in holding back 
of the full increase in salaries provided for many of the top 
administrative positions in the University. As a result, some of 
the Department Heads and Deans, with many years of service, are 
receiving lower salaries than men in similar positions at the Uni- 
versity hired quite recently. Thirty individuals are still held 
back from receiving the full salary due to them under the Barring- 
ton plan. It will cost only $7,900.36 if all thirty receive the 
salary to which they are entitled. 

The President emphasized that the situation is so 
serious that several of his best men are considering going else- 
where. If this should happen, the resulting problems of recruit- 
ing and retraining will cost far more than it will to make salary 
corrections now. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to amend 
the University's budget for the year be- 
ginning July 1, 1958 to include salary 
changes shown on the attached list to 
bring members of the faculty into the pay 
scale approved under the Barrington plan. 

President Mather reported that at the time the Barring - 
ton plan went into effect in 1956, University salaries were brought 
into line with college salaries generally. However, since that 
time, there has been a very rapid movement to provide salary in- 
creases both in the public and private colleges throughout the 
nation. Again Massachusetts is out of line. This problem is 



1989 



Salaries 



1990 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

becoming so acute that it will be necessary to amend the current 
budget to provide additional salary increases next year. He said 
that he will bring to the Trustees a proposed schedule of salary 
increases for their action at the January meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett said that a number of Trustees have 
proposed that the President's salary be increased substantially 
in view of salaries being paid to college presidents both in New 
England and elsewhere in the nation. He called upon Trustee Cashin 
to discuss this matter. Mr. Cashin reported that he had informally 
met with members of the Trustee Committee on Legislation and that 
they were unanimous in their opinion that a bill should be filed 
immediately requesting a salary of at least $20,000 for the 
President. A bill is necessary because the President's salary is 
fixed by statute. Mr. Cashin said that the President's salary is 
now $15,000 but that he has to pay $100 per month rent for the 
President's House. He knows of no instance in which housing is 
not furnished for college presidents elsewhere. The University of 
Rhode Island now pays $16,000 and house and when their president 
retires this year, the salary will be increased to $20,000 and 
house. Connecticut is increasing its president's salary to at 
least that amount and probably more. Mr. Cashin cited the salaries 
of college presidents in the mid-west which are very considerably 
higher. Chairman Bartlett polled all members of the Board present 
and they were unanimous in their belief that the President's 
salary should be at least $20,000. It was unanimously 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To file a bill before the first Wednesday 
in December to increase the President's 
salary to $20,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:25 p.m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



1991 



President 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



] 



1992 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Aafraiofccusftta above tSniiaraa 

D&** S3ffig@d SI* 81~Bi*i s Assiataast Feeffesoos "A M in 2oo4 XoctaalOBy, 

e££a«*&va Ja&tiasy X, 1958 at #0*435 (2 atopa above, i^sta©). 8»S. 
ffik$$i!$£ty of Ealic£OAio s Egypt; 22. S. osuS lb«l>» 8B&iwaro£*y o£ 
IXlitsoia* He ia «ugceRfcly as^l®yed in ttia Bepasrtssesst o£ Foml 

^tiolagy as t&a tfafcs&raifcy of llllaoia* 

3a&» Vkcn&s £o$icra a Asa&afcaet: PsofOfioov of Xaferfctial &<fesfc&iati:atioB, 
affaatiw Jai«ai?y S3 P 1958 at $6,2A0 (5 ©taps aSHWH* ilBisaiaJo D.B.&, 
SUaivarsifey of Haasac&tiaettas HA*, tfaiwBEaity of C&iae^atlest; &•&• 
l& sa ss«£a Un&ve&aity* Ue is pceaoocly esiployao' as Aaaiafca&fc 
FsttfOMOff of Sasioeaa aa$ SSooj js at 8&a Uatvasaifcy of $3aiz*e, 

Gerald &, ?ifc8®8g > ol&, Fsrofcoaox "A* s a# %r&aalfc*$sral B^ia&&g&ag 9 
o&£ect&ve Jr.mtf.sy l* 1950 at $9»100 (4ctopo <&ove ^inlssss). Ka ia 
a £923 gra&sa&a of tfee ifiasfltfMtaaQ&ftfl Ijastifco&a c£- Teahaolosy. At 

precept $&, Fita^ax:al4 la caaawlteat for aweiral Xaxga food psocaasosrs 
a&£ food aaoga* 



Merit Stag ^Mnaaaaa 

%±tjx Salloao, XiasfcxaetOK' ©£ BenflSBS 2<axs@aegea, effectives $en©sfea£ 3* 
1$5? fiscal $5 ft l&3 to $3,356 0. atop).. 

Jolm vJ„ 2^tx£a#a£k» i&asoatat© FfOfosaasf of Agrtoittttt^QL Es^issaa»ii^ a 
affSsatiw Beaec&exr l s 195? fsrasa #,,83.2 to $7,436 (2 ata$a afeava 

fStfC&maa} « 

Eoaart S* BoraJ, Zs»ttuctos w A n Poseatsy* effective Seagsfces 1* 1957 

fwHs $3*538 to $6,006 (2 ataya). 



■ ■»----.*..-^. 1 c.r,:^--.:f.s*i;f^v.*^r 



Sfr^i3 M e«& s* Biga&ew* X&sftvBCK&ei? in So&k^ G»al&»t£aa} e&£ectivo 
Sovestec 12, 193? ^£ $2,ji.S8, s.A* o»& 1LA* de^cees fern tte&rogsi&y 
of Utfc G0ltt&i»i&; ¥b,D, torn Gtaiwcoi Ldb£$aat» 

Egsaslail b. Sorption, Xasts&cto& is Fiaancfi Lf*t£sRe) fov tin apv&08 

the ©pKis^ ©e^Eat^' 1958 at $2 S 535, B.Ao l^tl^dt Gollofl^* ^^ && 8 
f«ll tio& ^caouBtl^ Ofi:£ca la GrocsfieX 






Sobart &. Potash tfaa pmsatai na tasttuatatt to Aaaiatant E^ofassor, 

©Sfecsive Sapteisbo? 1, 1957 us aassoal ©alaary of $5538. 25sifi Signse 1 
should fee collected to $5/72 as o£ that: date. 

Mrs* 8&dl$ Saias *»aa pro&ofced' £gcm lastwaatos to Aaaiataat Professor, 
efffeotive Jtesaary 1, 1957 at aaaual ml&xy e£ §5G?0. Shis ££gu?a 
saatrld be c&rraeted to $6006 as a£ fcfeafe date. 



Philip ©BOEisa, Xastcoafeor M A" ^sr&assltaffal ScmtOKic& itrass fell fc&ma 
to &3l£ tliHC bo^i«Ki^ Sflgrtcabe* S, 1937 At asmaal salary of $2535. 

Ho.ri:an £, J&aseE&«S2g 3 XnBtsacfeav its Electrical 8ag&aeeirita(g from hal£ 

time to Sail tlan effective February 1938 at $4,3i6« 



Chaosa in Qf££clal Title 

Xseas Ito«aatfg;h fron &s©ist.sa£ Ftbfesoor M tf' to tesistant QtaiverAity 
Libsari&n, effeotive Sept&a&er 1, 15S7* Bto salasy islsasage is inwolwl- 

Promotion 

Katkartas Swills free Laboratory Assistant at $3,445 to Bastraator in 
CfMsa&etvy at $4,316 oHfecfelve Septea&as! 1, 15S7. 



SeisntfitangsRt 



Siaiiard Hct«& ? Insss^ctor la SaglisB, eff^etfee iSa^tasta? 1, 195 
at 45,148 |ser year. 



Ksstsa, Cmpsms&ti i i ' ae Bstrft Stesvlce 



To H, X, 0, Sa&tb, Haa4 9 Br ; of Q^Qlogy, $70© «• ussfe SSermOL 

Beaeatd* CJastti*aat !tottc«2242C00) j ■ l ste fead aceaupt 1$50-$1), far 
the pestod Fata&ry 1, 195? ttaja^ Jam&ary 31, 1953* 

To *:c-^:7 s. Sfcillisga* Xftsts e a£ K&ti i :ica, $430 « daring fctse 
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a stvdy o£ a$*a tilisatlosi for i stioaal pcspooes * payable 

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of tlte Sfaispsrsity ia accordas sifcafce sddedale as earned 

and pay^ie Satiag ztm ism&h& ktvesteos aM Seaes&ar, 19S?» 



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TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

January 16, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Miss Buxton, Crowley, Haigis, Hoftyzer, 
McNamara, Taber, Whitroore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

At the request of Chairman Bartlett, President Mather 
reviewed the actions of the Executive Committee of the Board at 
its December 30, 1957 meeting. He said that since that date, 
Chairman Bartlett 1 s office has prepared and sent to the Attorney 
General a request for clarification of certain powers of the Board 
of Trustees under Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. The President 
said that the real question at issue is whether or not the Trustees 
have the power to grant merit increases to members of the Univer- 
sity staff. It is hoped that a favorable opinion will be received 
from the Attorney General. If not, it will be necessary to file 
legislation clearly granting to the Trustees the power to make 
merit increases. 

Chairman Bartlett then asked the President to present to 
the Board the list of appointments to be made at above minimum 
rates in accordance with Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. He said 
that in each case it is necessary for the Trustees to determine 
whether the proposed appointee has had comparable experience else- 
where so as to justify his appointment at the rate above minimum 
proposed by the President. 

President Mather reviewed the experience of each indi- 
vidual and it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of appointments 
above minimum. 



1993 



Freedom 
Bill 



Personnel 
Actions 



TRUSTEE 



Step-rate 
Increases 



Physical 
Education 
Playing Fields 



MILITARY 
Property 
Bond 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following list of appointments; 
appointments for General Electric program at 
Pittsfield; extra compensation payments; re- 
instatement and step-rate increase; reinstate- 
ment and promotion as listed on the attached 
sheets. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve step- rate increases for members 
of the professional staff of the University 
in accordance with the state schedule as 
earned and payable during the months of 
January and February 1958. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance has turned over to the University the em- 
ployment of a surveyor for the design of physical education play- 
ing fields. Previously the Trustees had recommended that the 
Commission employ Mr. Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates. According- 
ly, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute a con- 
tract with Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, 
Registered Land Surveyors & Civil Engineers, 
South Deerfield, Massachusetts, for the de- 
sign and supervision of construction for the 
grading and improvement of certain land for 
physical education playing fields, appropria- 
tion account number 8258-37, at fee of 6.50% 
of construction costs. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Air Force ROTC is 
able to reduce the bond which the University carries for the safe- 
keeping of property. This bond currently is in the amount of 
$80,000 but because of five years favorable experience can be re- 
duced to $11,000. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to execute for and in the name of the Board of 
Trustees a bond for safe-keeping of property 
issued to educational institutions under 
Section 9386, Title 10, United States Code for 
Air Force ROTC property at the University in 
the amount of $11,000. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President and Treasurer stated that within the next 
few months, the first two employees of the University of Massachu- 
setts will be traveling to Japan under terms of the ICA contract 
calling for cooperation between the University of Massachusetts and 
Hokkaido University. So that there will be no question as to the 
status of such employees, the President recommended that the Board 
take action which will indicate that such persons are on full duty 
status and it was 

VOTED : That all employees of the University of 

Massachusetts who participate in any phase 
of the University of Hokkaido-University of 
Massachusetts program, supported under ICA 
Contract W-374, be considered as on full-duty 
status as state employees. 

4 

President Mather reported that, with Trustee approval, 

the privilege of having automobiles on the campus or in Amherst was 

reserved to members of the three upperclasses some years ago. In 

the following year this privilege was restricted to juniors and 

seniors. Beginning in the fall of 1958, the privilege of having 

automobiles or other motor vehicles in Amherst or on the campus 

will be restricted to seniors only. Exceptions will be made for 

persons over 21, for handicapped persons, and for commuters. It 

was 

VOTED : To endorse the position of the President 
restricting the use of motor vehicles to 
seniors effective in the fall of 1958. 

President Mather discussed the history of the cooperative 

efforts of the University of Massachusetts and the State Department 

of Education, Division of University Extension, in providing 

college courses for men at Westover Air Base. In 1950 with the 

approval of the Trustees, the University entered into a cooperative 



1995 



Hokkaido 
University 



Automobiles 
use of 



University 

Extension 

Program 

Westover 
Air Base 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

agreement for the conduct of courses at Westover. Later it 
operated a program at Pittsf ield also in cooperation with the 
Division of University Extension. Last year the University dis- 
continued its cooperation with the Division of University Exten- 
sion at Pitts field and is now carrying a program for General 
Electric employees and others in the community entirely on its own. 

Recently, a faculty committee reviewed the Westover pro- 
gram and recommended that the University discontinue the program. 

The University is not convinced that it is maintaining 
a quality program at Westover and that it would be better to with- 
draw until the time when funds are appropriated directly to the 
University for carrying on general University Extension work. It 
was agreed to discuss this matter further at the next meeting of 
the Board. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 




Q_^- Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



ugroasm? of tg&ssac&ussm 

Personnel Appein&aenss for Board of Trustees 
January 16, 1958 



Appointments Above Miniagm 

BASHSS, Charles W, , Instructor la £is£heseatics, effective September 1, 
at $5,140 per yea? (4 steps above sini&Ks&). A.B. Eigk Foist College, 
JSorth Carolina, M.A. Univ&rsity of Sorth Carolina. He< is currently study- 
ing for his doctorate t&ich be ejects to receive' in August, 1958. 

BESTS*, Lorea P. , Professor of Goverssaeat, effective Sep tester 1, 195$ at 
$7,124 (1 step ssbeve saiaitSHa). &.B. Komeuth College. M.A. ssad Ph.©. 
University of Chicago* At present lie is an Associate Professor on leave 
fro® the University of Fl©rMs 

F03BE&S3, Herbert C« , Xastsoetaif "A* 9 , Horticulture, Kftltbaai Field Station, 

effective February 2, 195S at $5,??2 per year (3 steps above aiaissmi)* 
S.S* Ceraeil ISaivarsity. Be is surreatly employed as lose ISertical tural 
Agent ia Esses County. 

S1SBBS, Ciiftea M» s Instructor la Econeaaies,. effective Saptes&er 1, 
at $5*564 per year (vmziwsm)* A.B. and A.M. University of Tessas* 
present ha holds a taachiag feltaBBnie at the Utolvereity of Tessa, 

&K*A&» HrSa €reta B. , Instructor ia Eaglish, effective Jasosary Zi \ 1958 at 
$2,2&2 per year (hal£"ti&a and 1 step above ssinisasiO. BoA. Brooklyn College . 
H.A. University of Minnesota* 

WQWS S Id&ard J,, XTOtractor ia English, effective January 27, 1958 at 
§4,524 per year (1 step above saiatass) . B.A. and M.A. Canteb. He has 
been a-ats&er of the staff of Coleridge Boys 9 School, Cartridge, England. 

JSHHSCH, Stebert Josekisa., Instructor "&" 9 Veterinary Science, effective 
January 2, 1958 at $5,533 par year (2 steps shove siaftesaBs). Veterinary 
diplasa from Uaiv@rsl.ty of Senseves', Gemany. Be is presently Assistant 

Poultry Pathologist with the @el&nare State Bosrd of Agriculture. 

WEOT, Paul P., Associate Professor of Art, effective Septerter 1, 1950 
at $7,527 per year (iB&stas). B.A, Oberlia College, N.F.A* end rh.B. 
Pri&cetoa University. He is currently Associate Professor of History of 
Art and Architecture at Pennsylvania State University. 

80SE8&H, Jack, Instructor ia Hsthesaacics , effective January 27, 1953 at 
$5,148 per year (4 steps above sinimsa). A.B. Boston University, M,A, 
University of Massachusetts. He was previously employed at the Cos^uta- 
tien Center st HIT ^Ssere ha ves assistant to the director of Scientific 

and Engineering Coa^atatleas group • 

IMLKJV, Francis W. , Instructor in Education (Visiting Lecturer 1/3 time) 
effective January 27, 1958 at $1438.66, not to exceed second ss&estsr. 
Br. Murphy is principal of the Lynch Junior High School in Bolyotcs and 
has had aany years of successful experience as an adsaiai&trater . Be is 
currently Vice President of the Massachusetts teacher's Association, 



Appoinfosents 



ELAXSMLL, Jehu L. , Instructor M A*% Agricultural EagineeriTSg, for the 
period Ksvesabar 24, 1957 through June 30, 1958 at $2,535 (half-time). 

BtiE&SAB&I, Williess B. , Jr. , Assistant to the Dealt of Sifen, of festive 
January 27, 195® at $4,32$ per year. 3. A. Esserson College. 

G880£?» 2trs« Isabella L. » Assistis&t to the Dean of tasea, effective 
January 27, 1953 at $2,153 pas: year (half- Use) . A.B» Mfc, Holyoke College, 
U.& e Ssdzh College, recently has served as Assistant Manager of the 
Vtsieislt& Square House la Boston, 

G0SLS>, Thomas F. , Assistant Professor of Kososnce Laiagaases, one quarter 
tisaa during the sick leave of Susaser M» Greenfield, effective December 2, 

1957 • Me is ©alloyed at As&arst Colleges His salary will be $1,267 .50, 

I0B&ES, ttrs. Mary 6., las tractor to Sociology, effective January 27, 1957 

at $1,079 for second seaester only (half - time) • 

WUj&SQBt Krs. Grace, Instructor is 2©elogy, $4,316 per year, effective 
January 27, 1958, 

W&BBBBBGg Mertoc. Inatraeto? ia Electrical Engineering, effective 
Itaronfeer 1®, 195? at $4,316 f*ar year. Has on half time up to Sevesfcer IS. 

YO&ICB, Elaine, Instructor in Mathematics, effective January 27, 1953 
at $4,316 per year. A. 8* laater College. At present she is a graduate 
student at the University of Wisconsin s&ere she exacts to receive her 
M. A, degree at the end of the sessester. 



AlXfiH, Eliot D. , Associate Professor of English, second semester of 
academic year 1957-50 at $931, 50. 

Brn^ACE, Joha'H., Professor of Mechanical Sagisseeria§ £ second setaesfcer 
of acadesdc year 1957-58 at $567.66. 

ISAKf, John, Instructor la Chasiistry, second semester of acadesaic year 
1957-58 at $359.66. 

LIOTKJCiSH, Lyance G. , Instructor in t&chaaicel Engineering, second 
semester of academic year 1957-5® at $539oS®<, 

O'BXSKB, Joseph M. , Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering, 

second eeaester of aeadogaie year 1957-53 at $422.59. 

PIuTOS, Granville, Instructor in Chassis try, second ssa&sgter of acadessic 
year 1957*58 at $359.66. 

S&VES1ID, Jay, Assistant Professor of Speech, second semester of academic 
year 1957*58 at $422.50. 

S0BA&&, Daniel, Associate Professor in Hschsaical Engineering, second 
semester of academic year It 37-58 at $736.11. 



3. 



I 



Entra Compensation 

BSIGGSj Lawrence E„ , Associate Professor of Physical Education, from 
December 18 • 30, 1957, for teaching Driver Education and Driver Train* 
ing Course*, He should receive one iseek's ©alary or $144.75. 

TCJXLXAMS, Arthur R. , Assistant Professor of English, $150,00 from 
December 19 - 31, 1957. Dr„ Williass supervised the sectioning and 
scheduling of students for the spring semester, 1958. 



Belnatat eaeat , and Step Increase 

FEAKBR, Charles F. . Jr. , Instructor in Eomance Languages , effective 

September 1, 1958 at $4,940 per year. 



Reinsta tement and Prompt ion 

CL&BX, David R. , Assistant Professor of 
1958 at $5,772 per year 



English, effective January 27, 



Step-Bate im Increases 

To approve step-rate increases for seobers of the professional staff 
of the University in accordance vdfch the state schedule as earned and 

payable during the ssoaths of January and February, 1958. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



( 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 20, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
Haigis, Kiernan, McNamara, Perry, 
Taber, Whitmore, Kermit Morrissey, 
representing Governor Furcolo, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee: Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Crowley and Taber. 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the University 

and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To confer baccalaureate degrees on the 
following candidates effective February 
20, 1958 with the understanding that all 
bills owing to the University must be 
paid before the degree is awarded. (See 
attached list) 

Upon the recommendation of the Graduate School and of the 

President, it was 

VOTED : To confer the following graduate degrees 
effective February 20, 1958. (See 
attached list) 

On the recommendation of the faculty Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of the President, it was 

VOTE D : To award honorary degrees at the June 1958 
Commencement as follows: 

Bennet Allen Porter - Sc.D. 
Paul Allman Siple - Sc.D. 
Martha May Eliot - LL.D. 
Howard Johnson - LL.D. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of personnel 
actions. 



1997 



Nominating 
Committee 



Degrees 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



1998 



TRUSTEE 



Fines 



Sprague 
Electric Co, 

Endowment 
Funds 



Stock 



Graduate 
Courses 



Recreation 
Leadership 
Course 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Mather said that the Student Senate has gone on 

record requesting that fines for student parking violations he used 

to supplement the scholarship funds of the University. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve the request of the Student 
Senate to add the income from campus 
traffic fines to the trust fund account 
entitled "The University Scholarship 
Fund" and to treat this income as a 
student activity fund. 



It was 



VOTED: To authorize the President to spend at 

his discretion $250 from the current un- 
restricted gift of the Sprague Electric 
Company and $500 from unrestricted in- 
come from endowment funds for the benefit 
of the University during the current 
fiscal year. 

Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, 

recommended that the University exercise certain rights on American 

Telephone and Telegraph Company stock, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to exercise 
81 rights of the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company to purchase 9 - 4%7« 
convertible debentures using $900 of un- 
invested cash and to sell the remaining 
10 rights. The nine debentures are to be 
converted into common stock on or after 
Mav 12, 1958. 

Dr. Boyden reported actions of the Trustee Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study at its meeting at 11 o'clock. On the 

recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of new 
graduate courses of study. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the revision of the curriculum 
and course offerings in Recreation Leader- 
ship in accordance with the attached out- 
1 ine . 



1 



TRUSTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the offering of a major in 
Physical Education for Women in 
accordance with the attached outline. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the sabbatical leaves as 
outlined on the attached sheet. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the University to admit stu- 
dents from the other New England states 
taking programs of study under the New 
England Land-Grant College Regional Study 
Program at the in-state tuition rate, it 
being understood that the University will 
determine which of its programs are to be 
offered to out-of-state students on this 
basis. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds reported the actions of his committee at its meeting 

at 11 o'clock. On the recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached capital outlay 

program for the fiscal year 1959 and for 
the period 1960 through 64. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to enter into 

an agreement with Selwyn H. Graham for the 
appraisal of certain farm land and build- 
ings under appropriation item 8254-42, 
Chapter 763, Acts of 1957 at a fee of $6.00 
per hour plus travel expenses for all work 
except court testimony and preparation of 
court testimony, if necessary, which shall 
be at a fee of $12.00 per hour plus travel 
expenses; provided that for work other than 
court testimony the total fee for any one 
day shall not exceed $50.00. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to employ Gordon 
E. Ainsworth & Associates of South Deerfield 
to make land surveys of certain land to be 
acquired under appropriation item 8258-34 of 
Chapter 763, Acts of 1957. 



Physical 
Education 
for Women 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Regional 

Cooperative 

Program 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Appraisal of 
Farm Land & 
Buildings 



Phys ical 
Education 
Playing 
Fields 



2000 



TRUSTEE 



Murray D. & 
Anne H. 
Lincoln - 
land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to execute 
for and in the name of the Board of 
Trustees a land lease agreement leasing 
19.888 acres of land in Township of 
Blandon, County of Franklin, State of 
Ohio to Murray D. Lincoln in accordance 
with a lease agreement presented to the 
meeting for a period of one year from 
January 1, 1958 with automatic renewal 
for five successive years unless pre- 
viously terminated. 

President Mather presented his annual report for 1957 and 



Annual 
Report 



Committees 



it was 

VOTED : To approve the report as presented and 
to congratulate the President for his 
outstanding accomplishments. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED: To instruct the Secretary to cast one 
ballot for the following slate of 
officers and committee members for the 
Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts for the year 1958: 

President, Foster Furcolo 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 



Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 
Frank L. Boyden, Chairman 
Msgr. Joseph H. Boutin 
Grace A. Buxton 

Committee on Agricultu re and Horticul ture 
Harry D. Brown , Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Dennis M. Crowley 



Dennis M. Crowley 
Owen B. Kiernan 
Lewis Perry 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Charles H. McNamara 



C ommittee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis, Jr. 

Committee on F inanc e 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
William M. Cash in 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



1 



TRUSTEE 



2001 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Commit tee on Recognized Student A ctivi ties 

Dennis M. Crowley, Chairman Grace A. Buxton 
Frank L. Boyden Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Ralph F. Taber 



1 



\ 



Commit tee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 

Exec ut ive Committe e 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



John W. Haigis s Jr. 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



200 



9 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEGREES AWARDED FEBRUARY 1958 
College of Arts & Science 
Bachelor of Arts 



Magna Cum Laude 
John Everett Enos J 



r. 



Cum Laude 
Phyllis Turcotte Beauvais 



Margaret Mary Anderson 

Thomas Joseph Bowler 

Thomas Stuart Chapman 

Nancy Ann Coyle 

John James Durkin 

John Lawrence Gibbons Jr. 

Barbara Burke G-onsor 

Alvird Louis Hay ward 

Leonard Liz ale 

David William MacKay 



Rite 



Everett Joseph Marder 

Ronald Ellsworth Matheson 

(-&WOG Lo on -) as of the Class of 195? 

Joseph Edgar Mauger Jr. 

Yvette Rachel Poirier 

Alden Wilson Powers 

Lorna Vivian Regolsky 

David Richard Rehbein 

Frank Evans Spear 

Christopher Fenry Thacher - 

(owes fine) as of the Class of 1957 



Bachelor of Science 



Eugene Francis Dunton 
Jeanne Adele Higgins 
Joseph David Ingram 
Barry Jans son 

Edward 



F. 



Nicholas Dean Lincoln 
William Michael Russell 
Charles T. Schmidt Jr. 
Werner Sohn 
Tateosian (Skme ) 



College of Agriculture 
Bachelor of Science 



Robert 
Norman 
George 
Jerome 



Lester 
Burr 
Fowa rd 
Joseph 



Bradley Jr. 

Blom strom 
Donovan 



John L. Gallagher 



Willard Wayne MacDonald 
Henry Edwin Martineau 
William Stephen Mueller 
Walter James Wixon 
Philip Rodman Woodworth 



School of Business Administration 
Bachelor of Business Administration 



Stephen Ethan Goldman 
George Gardner Lesure 



4 



) 



Goodman 



Jerrold 
Samuel Elwood 



Slafsky 
Smith 



Joseph Leo Sullivan Jr. 



■ '.;■;■■ 



2 - 



School of Engineering 
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

Robert G-eorge Fitzgerald Edward Joseph Nichols (# 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Robert John Barnini William Francis McCarthy 

Charles Lloyd Collins Richard Dale Reardon 

James John Johnson G-ardner McCabe Rice 

Arthur Fogg Spear Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Merton Irwin Rosenberg 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Donald Charles Currier Robert Charles Porter (I.E.) 

School of Home Economics 
Bachelor of Science 

Patricia Arlene Lynch 

Division of Physical Education 
Bachelor of Science 

James Thomas Charlton David B. Isenberg 

Lawrence Paul Murray 



1! 



TOttlSBSXSS CF IBSSACSDBBSTS 

ORADUASB SCHOOL 

0&!D2DiMES FOR iOTSIBED DECRTO 
SHttHG. 195$ 



I 



XUdrei £. Antbofal 

William Bspaoor 
WiXHaH FiX©32© # . 3r® 
WillioB A e Fitspata?ick 

Gerald L* f'trtsswov 
DaniaL $ta Ssalag 
Cheo-T©ck San 



Astasy So Forbos 









Sociology 



February 5* X950 



I! 



BKBFBBSOT Or Hft88ACBB88R8 

Bsrswasd AppotG&s&sata So? Soasd of !ta©£€sa® 
P&tawffly 20* 195© 

i^wiistosss&fes insets® Ml&lsKusi 

*& $? 9 436 $$£> y&sss <2 sfc©pa <ste© s&al8s&fnj)« 8.8« loss® Sfifit® «&H®g® a 
&8* M$?$ss&ty of I£esarlcnft» Ss bos torn c«2«s£a«l tfi&li tess&y 4«H CloS> 
$$o$gm® sise® 1949* tassa 1949 t9 1954 fee ra-gl^S &s a Cros&y ttwioa 
TmstSa &?ss©e&2&© ££ 1mm Stat* @?lleg$« IMs eosfc «@8 &s&£ssB$t«& fe® 
accept a feltamfeif* toa tin »ta*£l &»M Clofe CcosBlti;teo» S&sc® JassMsgr 
19S6, tfir. toss tea hmn ©^1©^ oe a 4«B Qfc&b %&&& fey Ms&Sgsa Sfes&fc 
%s&tm%$$&f vto&ee h® hm b&m m®$&m$&l® £oc t&d 4-H piK$ffQ& Id Hssfeg&s&n? 
Coesss^» M^%@ss e as iffl&gs&s'££l sbs$ Ma$dy*m%aata& &E3© eftoil&ff to 
essfees® ^assfficSsseotfiSo SZ&o sefl$an9ll»il£fcfie8 cad <&ft£aa to g&£s p®8l£te 
s?€ ess^&^l© to §ta$© of zlm *&&$&§&«; 8ta&® Club &&a£&ar is* ^spaaelmaotta* 

BTO®M, Botold L, XsatstMstoar £s& tes^saee LaKQpqgcsat <&£eg£&*o 

Se|»t®fe®jr l e 1958 &£ $4 ft 9^> pep yeas* (3 ss:®^© «t»s*«F© iMni, B.&o ©a$ 
M*&, CSsl^s^^i^ e£ Xlllsoia «a£ la coxcenfely £@&8&&iiss teS wiM% &@«a»S 
hi® dtefltosfflta as tfe& Sfoftrearaity of niseis £©* & m© © Xaae&ia® to&®£@g£ 
at tin Qatomity ©£ Xllleola, 1»»50* Xteasbt «t J^ss©a s M@$&@jgis»s»& 
Hl^i ^tes»i 9 X#3>1*54. Itaiiisg $m®i®&®%& st f&o. ftei'-wcaity of BiacewRiB,, 
1954»S? aadt teas Xaatsuetev, 1957*58. 

»JI& 8 Bessy S« 9 tksmtmGt&m m& PJZ&B&mmG® Sag&aa&EV of SS» 
effective ttag& 34, 1958 at #§,B® psu? $<» fe«iau$« S.S. I» Civil 

ftRgiasegiog, $$m@im Btmm College* 

S§eXMrn&, Batfe Mlea, lmtm®&©$ 1st Hl»tt«wry C^teitis^ Loetunnr) » •€£cetft«e 

J@^ory 2i&» 1938 «fc $1,339 f®3f % t&n 4ssic« ^®€©®^ ©c^astsr ©t®^@ ob«w 
vbdaafO* B*A* ssd H«A« « .HftljralBft C^ll@^® $ HI* 9* Ifei^aesity of 

Mis^^s@tao ^t© «ea Xflatsaetov» Bu tei^te 0®ll<^@ 9 1944»4d^ tosti8r«a? a& 
IBslls C^ll«@@ ft 1947*4$; ^ssis^sfe Vmimmi: st miU Gollag«, 1948*49; 

%&&&%$$!& teetosos 1 ®ss ^^seluasx 'Xss^gs^sgito®®! ®®t\®&%$ 1950*51 s WfMMt%^ 
I&®%m@% m m. miy&e €©11^©^ 1§S§*S?, 

Bu®®&& ©f ^of^sfE^ra^ BoaoQiPta) @ff©©si^e Wm®h 1, 1968 s^ $i s 43S |«r y«r 

Aasistemt feofs^o^ of Eblltieol SeiosMBe, S^« J^to®# eallcisa* 1946^9; 

Fosns^' ^ssas^ip^ ^®dss® Xsas iMs8 9 QssUffls^, Xllissoi© s LfS§5 ^ES^ei^e 
Fg©£es©@s e£ B®li^i«@l So£os«ia» ^* Mm%& 9 ® ikdnasai&f, 1951-51 ; ®smx®& 
Ba®mm®®@&&m» Bi^isto® of ®m®mA 9 ISasiiocSBsadtts ^®fte5Kat of 
1957 g© ^s&0o 






&I8MS, too Cter, itssiafcassfc Pso&Odo* w2 StossKSfeea Lassggsfi®^ Cfc **a» 
<teiB& s&fe lda»e of Bs. Ssss^ss IL 6sti*a&£lal49) ®££mtiv® tesssssy 2? 9 
1936 afe #33.?S for t2» tasss&s&r* ISA Brya Iter CoUasa, &»&• E&*Migf® 
Oollogfte Aaalataat ia ft«s» eeaaraea s£ ^s^soffst Collage' dasls& &&& y«*r® 
m$<Ȥ& asas 1956*57. 

C&01&JS, taro&c® Bo P Xaatrae&or la Elaa&rioal Eagiaearia& CI %>$sm etirlag 
s«€s®$ sosssst&sff) effective Jfistsssy &&» if S3 && $1,079« & tans no 

ai«&5fcK©aie8 &©&tei£i&a its &he Kawy £ or fear yoars @&$ siss? tea &&© @©««8«© 
to eaaplega for Ma «&sgs©i&« . 



C&B0B, i*asra M. ft Xestrrotor ia- %ml®$$ (StoaeolaB &®ao&i«i&®> at 1/3 tta 
for s®€®s»S saasatar ©sly, effeefcive Jaaaezy 27, 1958 a& $?i$ 33* B.S<, 
Balaeseftty ©£ Haaaaelittaefcge, a^s is eorreatly ®te4yiss for aa 
6t tiMn Qeivereiey of Maaeaelaieefeee. 



DiSSSBO, gosssssirte L, , Xaaerttcter 4e feology (Taaaalag Ae$®e&at«&} ®& 1/3 

fcissB, ef£@s£:ta Jismsaary Z? 9 19S§ ©£ $719.33 fw a©€w»i ©OTsafcer* B.A. 
iteater €$11®$©, &&• M&o Holyeiee Ooll@ge« Sh® ie <e&mis£!&ly ©fe$s#ii$g for 
as ®&&aaMto& y degree afe the H&iwra&fey or* MaseadbasaeSfc®* 

BP6SBXR, Mre« Alice, Issstswtor ia Kafeaensfclee (V&s&&i8$ Lecturer) ®i£®&&im 
January 27, 1958 e& $1,083 'per yefar' (2 ©t@3»a above ss&atam due fc© pswious 

a®wi@&} for aal£ t&m dsar&sag eeeoed a«ss8®t@r 8 B»8 Kev Jersey Colls®® for 
^atae&g H»S» tolwrsi&y of Wi$©a»ste. 

QOOBfBXB, Mra Marajsserifce Bmmi^ s Iaafccuctor in Essilteh (% t4sB«> ®£f@©&i^ 

Jmsssasy 27, 195$ «t $1,®7S for ®eem^ $«©g&@£* B„Ao 8bA£& €©Xl®g®, 

faran g^fe«^@r If 56 to April 1957 , 



£EVXS90R» Mo*- J@®® 9 Znstztteftor ia Ui^llJJh 44 tlaw) «f S ®sfe£im Jsmsarj %7 p 

1958 us '$719*33 'for s&eoad soeeeeer. BoSc Cifej Coll^iga of Wm York* Slio 

is fser&iiBg; to«5©r4 o Easter 9 a dogsttB fsos fTOs^yl^ssda 8&cfc« lltelv®r@isy« 

©ffoefei^s t^ns@^ 2 9 I9SS «& $2,535 per ssseraso K e S« ©saA^sralt^ of 
HsuHMwInsfpefefts (r@feTO^ 1958} • 

H^SI^^S!, Hsnr£4 ^%fefe s Zfit8*r«ie&or Ct«®^lia@ Asooolft&el la 2©olo^ Ci/3 

fete®) & ^ff@©Slw Jffisssrf 27. 1958 «& $71®o33 for s@€^saS ^^^»g@r B«S<, 

fe&© OialaQraiey of SS&aaaeSmaefcfta* 

PiSXBK, ^JSi^iaK !• » XaeCrae^or, B«s>t®rjr C% tia») , of ffaotfcre Joonsry 28, 19Si 

at $1,079 for ®m*m& s«j!sal;6t% B»4 fl Ao&ar&e C0ll4^e o E® is mem a 

©r&*fa§;© ©l^i^^t ae tbo oa&veralfsy of isaaaoafeaaotsa asi «ill fee a X@@«lii^ 
^ssoelEta for Stat ^®v© ^orlo«8« 

K^^Ei, mz&o Msry 3? XastriseS^r i& Semiology, offoe&lve J^sis^sry 27, 1958, 

at $2,158 for ®m®is& aaa«a£or« B.$. ?aaeliera Coaisg® of I©© Brltaia, €©iss , 
IScAo Kftjd^i»rsity ©f 2&aaaafcaae&fc8« ^® tsoa a Beooeroh MsiaCABfi, Sa?tesisi©ss 
Sawies s Halssttraity ©f '&aao8?imsect8 1955-57. 



AppolntiaentP (continued) 



1 



ROB?, Shirley Go , Instructor in Physical Education for SStessm (15/16 ties) , 
effective Febrefiry 3, 1958 at $2,075 for second seaester. B.S. Loagtsood 
Teachers College, Virginia, St„A„ University of Korth Carolina. 

SKILLINSS, Ites. lath, Instructor, i$*otaay (Visiting Lecturer) (% tiae), 

eff active January 36, 1958 at $1,079 for second seaester. B.A. Smith College. 

TIFPAHY, ioaald K», Instructor, Psychology (% tlse), affective January 26, 
1958 at $539.50 for second sessster. B.A. Bates College, &,A<>T. Harvard 
University. Be is presently studying a& the University of Massachusetts 
for a Ph. Do in Psychology. 

EKSLISH, Willies, Instructor, Mathcss&tles (1/3 tiaa), affective February 17, 
1958 at $636.18 for second ss&ester. A.B. Harvard University. Has had no 
previous teaching experience and is presently a graduate student at the 

University of Massachusetts. 

W00DF0RK, Belsea Carter, Visiting lecturer in Sociology (1/3 tis»), effective 
January 27, 1958 at $719.33 for second semester. B.A. Lincoln University, 
M.S.S.H. Boston University. He has had aany years of experience in the 
field of social work and is at present Chief of Social Hsrfc Service at the 
Veterans' Administration Hospital in Harthanpton. 



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U23XVE&82SY <F MASSACHUSETTS 
fiSsrsorandusi 

Fro®: Graduate Office Bate: February 5 9 1953 

To: Mr. Jasaes H.' Burke 

Subject: Recosaoseadaticms .£or sex-? "200" category courses for Graduate School 

The Graduate School Couecil reeossQads to the President and Board 
ot Trustees approval of the following courses for graduate students only: 

291. SBMLK&R. Research ssethods ia Agricultural Engineering. 

Credit, 1 
The Sta££, 

KOMS BCOHOHICS " 

201. MvgI*0PMXS IB E9S3BIXX01I BSUCftTXCKi. Consideration is gives 
to (1) interpretation of chsagisg aad nes7 concepts';-., (2) interpretation 
of teckaical f&aterial; (3) place of nutrition ia schools and public 
health programs. m 

Prerequisites: Ko&e Ecoaoaias 52 ©r 6 credits ia physiological sciences. 
3 class hours. Credit ,^-3. 

Mrs. Coll 



% 



250. BO&S £&2&G23@K? FSE TOQAX'S FAMILIES. Emphasis ©a maaagessent 
principles involved in fasily economics, -tsork simplification^ and 
decision askiag ia the hone, for teachers 9 .i&tension workers » and others 
&h© ssork ia an advisory capacity with families. 

Prerequisites: B.S. degree ia Hesse leonoeics iaclediag Hose Economics 
175 aad 11 9 ©r equivalent; sad professional experience. 

Credit , 2»3. 
Miss Strattner (with 
Esse Masageaant Specialists and Eescsrch Staff 
ia Family Finance) Susssr fisslcshop, 1958. 

265. AKHSsL BEH&.VI0S. The evolution and significance of behavior 
patterns including territorialiss!, sating, parental care, migration and 
orientation of invertebrates and lower vertebrates. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 153; ISO oar 181 or 182 j and 169 or 170. 
2 2*»hsur lecture-discussion periods. Credit , 3. 

Mr. Bartletc and Mr. Hatting 

240. AlWAECSD CILHU^E aHD €«&Effl¥E PEKSZG&OGY* Betailed study 

of one or eere topics from limited fields *shieh have feroad implications 
ia biology. Such topics i&elttde: radiation biology, physiological 
adaptations, eaayss>logy 8 and sttbsEicrescopic structure ©£ protoplasm. 

Prerequisites: Zoology 183 sad 184. Credit 9 2-4. 

r. S^essoa, Mr. Eoberts s and Mr. Noser 



»2*» 

286. PBIEGZPLBS CF S2SXSS&TXC ZOOLOGY. The object ives 3 approaches 
aad results of research in systessatic scology will bo discussed. To be 
considered ore the procedures applicable to binomial nas&i^ with partic- 
ular es^hasis on analytical procedures for des&a&ning Xo^er tasonomic groups, . 
Prerequisites: Ecology 153, 171, 172, and cue of the £©Ho^iBg: 170, 
139^ 181, or 182. Credit, 2. 

The Staff. 

GSOLi&Y 

She following course replaces 294, Igneous and Hefiamszphic petrology; 
203. I€S®0US PEIB0EAGY. The description, classification, origin, 
and alteration of Igneous rocks, feasain&tlon of redes in hand spee&sen 
and is thin section under the isieroscepe. 1957-58 and each alternate year. 
Prerequisites, Geology 56 and 201* Credit, 3. 

Mr. Farquhar. 

206. ESffAMOmiXC PETEdLOSY, The description, classification, and 

origin of tsetsssorphic rocks, Microscopic study of suites oi thin sections. 
1958-59 and each alternate year. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites: Geology 56 and 201. Mr. Farquhar. 

22§. mP IKE5RPSEE&SX0SI. A laboratory study of the various types 
og ®g®s used by geologists, &lth special reference to Che identification 

and interpretation of landfonss and structures. 

Prerequisites: Geology 53, 72, and 89. Credit, 2, 

Mr. Smith. 

236. ASOAtiCSD SXRUC£U3AL GBOL'SGY. A survey of the dynamics of 
crusts! deformation, including isostasy, orogeny, espeirisental studies, 

and mechanical principles. 1959*60 and each alternate year. 
Prerequisites, Geology 53, 72, and 73. Credit, 2. 

230. ABPABCSD POT&S1CM2GY, A laboratory study of surface expression 

as a key to subsurface phenomena as illustrated by specif ic areas. 
1959-60 and each alternate year* Credit, 2. 

Prerequisites: Geology 189,191. Mr. Ssith. 

SOCIOLOGY 

264. SHB INDIVIDUAL AW SBGBSEZ H CSOSS-^OLTOBaL PElgPOTiOT. 

A cross-cultural consideration of the relationship beteeea the individual 
and society. Attention «111 be directed to theories, methods and 
©ispirical findings as reported in anthropological literature. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 153 3 154 or equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Stsarta. 

* 230. C€BIPAE&?IVB EBtSC&SIOIi. Studies of contemporary educational 

systems in such countries as England, France, Germany, Russia, and Japan. 
Prerequisite, location 151 • Credit, 2*3. 

FOOD XSCHKO&QSy 

The following course replaces Food Technology 201, 232, Special 
Invest igat ions : 

203. BESSASCS PEOJECi'. lesearch on food technology psobleos not 

related t© the thesis. For Hi.©, candidates only. Credit, 1-4. 

The Staff. 



,--^ 



I 



■3* 



si&tistics 

"statistics 216. ^Btf&SCEB APPLIED STATISTICS. Varioas esperi- 

ssezstal deaigasj, the ass»im?ti©KS uodeslyiag their use* a&d the appro- 
priate statistical analyses will bo presented. Xncl&oad will be such 
topics as orthogonal and raa«bieiae«J designs, tread analysis, soa- 
parametric eechQl$xes 9 and jsalti-variata analysis. 
Prerequisite* Psychology 175 9 ©r the eqwi^alaat. Credit, 3. 

Mi-. Myers. 

272. immnam HBUSTEIH. PSSCSOSA&TXX* A cossi«2erati<m of the 
theory an4 principles o£ &an*sacMise«eaviYOias3at systems. Xn regard to 

aaa^ssacMne interactions special atsoatlon is givea to descriptions 
analysis, asd synthesis in tanas of information theory, serve analogues 
amd Gpessticas research, ©^eratioas research will fee co&sld&red only as 
it applies to the contest of industrial psychology* la regard t© Ean« 
ei59iss&sea£ interact loss special consideration is givaa to psychophysiological 
effects. Attention is also gl^ea to current ssathsds and practice. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 186 and 271. Credit , 3. 

Sir. Teichnsr. 



I 



hi Gilbert L. Slsedsiee 



University e£ Massachusetts 



Frcia: Shannon MeCuae, Invest Date: BeaMrtMwr 2, 1957 

To: Course of Study €03m£t£&e 

Subject: to&sioa of Curriculum esid Course Offerings la Eeereatioa Leadership 

Htsous^out its previous history at the Sniversity of SSassaclmsetfcs the 
gaajor curriculum ia recreation leadership has bees restricted to the upper division. 
This practice has bee© unsatisfactory end has been a issjor factor ia the inadequacies 
of our gi^dsiating majors. 

As a result of its transfer to the Biviaion of Fhysieal Education a ^o»a 
professional type o£ prograsi is aero possihle. I® the revised curriculum liberal 
arts education* professional core, and specialisation parallel and cosplessasit each 
other. This plan should increase -fsotivstiea filth regard to the liberal arts eds* 
catica, allot-? for exploration to dates-Mae •ehethsr recreation leadership is the 
correct choice ©£ mjor s and alio© sufficient tims for a progression of coasrses ia 
the specialisation* 

Xa gensr&l pattern this prasEsa is ttissilar to the p-£@£essi©nal major ia 
Physical Education for Man, 

She proposed curriculum e^co^asses these concerns: 

1. S^loratioa aad ©rtej&ation (i^roduetion to recreations, ©sploratory leadership 
©sperieace) . 

2. General Liberal Arte Education 

3. Bactereuad Undors tradings ^prepriste for amy c©»s8i£y leader (psychology, 

sociology, gewrnssent, public health). 

4. (Seneral 1-aadc rsiiip A bilities (speaking, siting* audio-visual aids* first aid* 
group leaderships recognition of eemualcable diseases), 

5» lSEfe.^SlE ^^ leadership ability ia each ©£ the i^ertant progress areas 
J^cSSTSeSTSaSts, easing., draan,. ssusic, naturoj, physical 9 and social). 

6. SjRjBoi^jjj^ten in oae or ttio program areas 9 or ia a sefiseece appropriate to 
a specialised type oi es^loysest a such as hospital Keerestion (electives). 

7. Professional Attitude (Concepts ia recreation* professional conference 
attendance) . 

8. Supervised leadership E&perieBse (practice leadership). 

Analysis of credits: 

1. -general arts cad science causation 

2. Ganeral«g?rofcssioaal education Ckack$round) 

3. Specialised professional ~ theory 

4. Specialised professional • ©Mil© 

5. Practice leadership 

6. Siect 1*963 (patterned on occupational ata>) 

7. Military (for saen) 

She credit totals vary: 



42 credits 


21 


M 


23 


.** 


16 


If 


6 


ft 


12*24 


»» 


4 


H 



Miniums 126 

138 142 



6 
-2- 

Di£ferences between the requirements for men and tsosiea are doe to the 
II oilitaiy rc^uiresseat. Variations between mln&eaua and eastaast are due to the de« 
II mends o£ the specialisations. 

$hile accreditation of recreation departments is not yet in existence, 
tentative standards have been scrsssiated and tested by inspection of the progress 
at several institutions, the proposed curriculum ??euld meet these standards. 
The present curriculum does not. 



The proposed catalogue description o£ the major is as follows: 

HECEE&SI©^ LEADERSHIP ft. S. Randall , Adviser 

The department seeks to prepare men and sjssea £er positions involving 
administrative, supervisory and program leadership responsibilities in municipal 
recreation agencies , voluntary and youth serving agencies, hospitals, and industrial 
and institutional organisations. 

The program is designed to provide opportunities for a general education, 
a knowledge and understand!^ of people and society, activity skills and resource 
knowledge, professional cotspetescy, and practical experience in various leadership 
situations. 

In addition to the curriculum as described hales?, the student is required 
to 1) attend a professional conference approved by the department; 2) participate 
in pro-grassing activities at the Studest Onion, «ith a scout troop, or in a similar 
setting approved by the departments 3} devote one ssssser (minisssa sis tsechs) to a 
recreation prscticum* with or without pay; and 4) elect a selection of courses 
uhich &ili enhance his professional background. 

itaiss the required courses are the following: Physical Education S>, 
badminton and basketballs P. E. 36, aauatics; p. E. 3$, Tennis and minor recreational 
sports; P. S. 64, gssscs and archery; P. S. 69 and 70, recreational dance and winter 
sports; and P. S. 34, golf, and volleyball. These courses apjply to both men and 
TTossn and tb£11 be taught jointly or b^ separate sections as appropriate. 



1st Semester Credits 2nd Semester Credits 

English 1 2 English 2 2 

Speech 3 2 Math 12, Functional 3 

Botany 1 3 Zoology 1 3 

Government 25, American 3 History 26, American 3 

Sociology 25, Intro. 3 Physical Education 22, First Aid, Safety 3 

Eecreatlon 1, Intro. 3 Recreation L. 2, Social 2 

Physical Education 9, Skills & Tech. 1 Physical Education 64, Skills & Tech. 1 

Military I (men) ni 1 Military 2 (men) 1 

(men) 13 (men) 18 

(ssoses) 17 (tsemea) 17 



-3- 



I 



1st Semester 

English 25 

Art 75, Art Appreciation, or 

Mttsic 51, Siocovericg I&ssic 
Recreation &, 25, Creep Leadership 
Physical Education 39, Skills & Tech 
Heme Bcotsoaies 63, Arts sad Crafts 
Military 25 (men) 
Elective 




SOPHCSSOSK TSAR 

Credits 2nd Semester Credits 

3 English 26 3 

3 Zoology 54, Field Hatorol History 3 

Speech 76, Stage Direction 3 

Recreation L» 26, Caap Counseling 3 

Physical Education 36, Skills & Tech. 1 

Psychology 26 3 

Military 26 (men) 1 



(men) 17 

(ffOmen) 16 



JffiSXGRY&AR 



lot Semester Credits 

Kesic 55, Org* 6 Sir. of Choral @ps. 2 
Psychology 93, Adol* or 94 Child 3 

Public Health 61, Gen. & Cosssunifcy 3 

Recreation L* 63, latere Bee. 3 

Physical Education 69, Skills & Tech. 1 
^Sociology 51, Urban &/©r elective: ; 3- 6 

15-18 

^Sociology 51 or 52 required 



2nd Semester Credits 

BSssic 56, Org. & Mr. of Inst* Gps.~" 
Psychology 62, Social 
Education 66, ^udio-vieeal Aids 
Recreation L« 56, Gper. of See. Fee. 
Physical Education 70, Skills & Tech. 
^Sociology 52, Sural &/©r eleetives 3- 6 

15-18 



3 
3 
3 
1 



1 



I 1st Semes ter 

Recreation h. 77, Org* & Ada, or 

Cosm. Recreation 
Recreation L. 79, Practice, Ldshp* 
Journalism 75, Bern Gcmunicatien 
Sociology 75, Social Problems 
Electlves 



Credits 2nd Semester 




J Credits 
Recreation L. 90, Concepts In Bee. 2 
Recreation L* SO, Practice Ldshp* 3 

Speech 91, B&fcea^ere. 3 

Physical Education 84-,- Skills & Tech. 1 
Slectives 6-9 



15-18 



1 



proposed curriculum necessitates. 
of this department as follows : 



various changes in the coarse offerings 



io CSian^e See* I*. 51 (1) 
Recreation* 



Principles of Recreation; to Esc, L. 1 (X) Introduction to 



2. Change title of Sac. L. 79 (X) 80 (11) Eecrentien Leadership Guidance and 

Practice; to Practice leadership* 

3* Change See* L* 52 (11) Creep Leadership and Ceop Ceissselisgs to See. 2*. 26 <XZ) 

Gasp Counseling; and modify description to read: 

A study of the organised csep and the counselor's part in it, including 
characteristics, organisation, operatixs procedures* and program, Major 
chassis is given to camper guidance and the acenlsition of cashing and program 
skills* Seen student ©ill participate in leadership emergences of various 
kis&s fires panel presentations to assuming the counselor's role for a limited 
time ^srisg the tmo-aight casing trip. 

(2 class hoars, 1 2-honr laboratory period) Credit, 3* 

^* ^Ql^fcQ prerequisites for Sec. I*. 77 (1) Organisation and A&ainistratiou of 
Cossrasity Recreation. 



I 



5. B&cg. Sec. I.. 74 (II) The Recreation Prograa. 
6* Mi Rec * ^ ^ CI) Social Eseraatioa 

OrgJS&isatioa, leadership, sad activity skills for tSa© plaaniag atid cosa&ict- 
isg of social recreation programs. 

(1 class horn:: 1 2~&msr laboratory period.) Credit, 2. 

7. Add &ee. L. 25 (X) Group Leadership 

Sjsceessfnl leadership techniques for forssal aad iaf onsal groups of various 

age rashes assd in various settings: clubs, ce^sittces, discussion groups , 
panels* sys^ssiuns, trips, ttcoxgaaieed activities, and tls© XiSca. Practical 
experience thrccgh role-playing end student presentations is e^plsasised. 

<2 class hears; 1 2»feeur laboratory period.) Credit, 3. 

Esc. L, S3 (I) Mature Becraation 



Organisation, current practices * leadership, and activity skills £0r 

reerastiemal protasis based sipon interest 1b the natural sciences • 

<1 class tassj 1 2,~heax laboratory period) Credit, 2. 

Itaec&Qpisite, Ecology 34, or consent e£ it® tractor 

9. AM Bfic* I*. 56 <2X) Operation of Eecreaticn Facilities 

* Playgrounds,, ym&h casters, eensssnity recreation centers, day cssip©, 
resideass cusps, and paries are considered t?ita regard to layouts, aaiatenanco, 
GdieSaliBis;*. adaptation of $«ogxaa to available facilities , leadership, prograaa 
supplies end e^isipgseEt, and provision© for ftaaita and safety. Field trips are 



(3 class feossrs) Credit , 3. 

W. Md lee. Z» 90 (XX) Concepts in Beescatien 

Critical consideration of feasie concepts am! ©£ current viosipoiats end 



1 



{2 class tosrs) Credit , 2. 

U. • Add Egg. L. 91 (1) 92 (XX) Special Problems 

Xndivi^ifiX intensive study of an aspect of recreation and tfe& presentation 
of reselts is written forss, 

(Hours fey srrai^eMint) Credit 2-3 

2fais course is net a part ©£ tfee rehired curriemtak It is nac«kid to 
enrieb tbe program for advanced students is certain of t&e specialisations. 



I 



1 



Sfee eevisioQ of the caxti/ealvask ia recreation leetarcMp else ncessoltateo 
the addition of the Slofc&sg courses: 

Skills &VL& Sedraifiies 1b Bearcat ion Lsadassiiip 

12. Md P. E. 9 (I) Skills god Tectai#2e3 

fB@VGlopa&s£ of ftra&a&eafi&l sMlis 4snd stet&ods of teacM-ss-g and organising 
groups £o? pss&lci&aslen la hadstasoa em4 bos&e&bsll. 

(60 clock hongs) Credit, 1. 

13. Add JP. S. 39 (I) Skill© sssd Tectmitpes 

BevelspEienC ©£ fexscfeeistal skill© ene 1 m&th®&® of teaehisn essd ©rgasaisiKg 
gXGqps for participation in Tesaia &s& ssiise-r secsefitioeal sports. 

(60 elock taass) Credit, 1* 

14. Agg #. 5. 69 (1) 70 (XI) Skill® rad Tedtsifs^s 

&Qtt@l@$@8B& of gisstaieiatel skills and isethods of te&sfii^g sod organisisg 

groups ror participation io visiter sperts aad the varioiss 4&sce forsss imclndis^ 
etiraic, social emd needera. 

(60 clock hoses) Credit, 1. 









1 



UHI7JRSIIT I 1 MASSAOHUSSTIS 
Division of Physical ^Education 
A Curriculum for Teacher Training for Women 



For several years there has "been an increasing number of requests from high 
school students and students now enrolled in the University for a major in physi- 
cal education for women. During the same time the decrease in teachers in this 
field is appalling. The completion of the Women's Physical ^ucation building and 
the continued increase in the number of women students make such a major course 
both possible and practical at the University of Massachusetts. 

The staff of the department of physical education for women has prepared this 
curriculum and herewith submits it for consideration and action. 

The curriculum includes general cultural subjects in order to provide a liberal 
education, sciences which afford the background for the professional training and the 
professional subjects themselves, plus the opportunity for practice in the various 
fields of physical education, elementary, secondary, college or adult* 

The curriculum is planned to educate a teacher to "be well rounded in the field 
of physical education and ready to take her place either in the elementary or second- 
ary schools of the Commonweal th or elsewhere. It is felt that such a ulan for gener- 
al teacher training should be established first. Then, when numbers and interests 
indicate the need the curriculum ..may he broadened to include specialisation in dance, 
sports, adaptive (corrective) and health education. 

Women students who major in physical education are seldom interested in teach- 
ing in the elementary schools unless they are brought into contact with children of 
that age. This curriculum attempts to acquaint the prospective teacher with the 
child and his school in order to aid in alleviating this particular teacher shortage. 

There are frequent requests for women physical education teachers to teach 
health and hygiene classes in both the elementary and secondary schools. Judicious 
selection of elective courses in Public Health, Home ""Jconomics, Psychology and Soci- 
ology added to the two reqtiired courses could give a background in health education. 

This curriculum follows th© general pattern of requirements in the University. 
It is similar to the program in physical education for men asd the two programs have 
some courses in common, but it meets the unique requirement for training women teach- 
ers in physical education. Guidance in the choice of electives will prov£&& a prepa- 
ration which will meet the requirements for certification in most states. 

Hespectfully submitted, 

(Signed) RUTH J. TOTMAN 

For the Women's Physical ISducation Staff. 



• 









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cammssm $€& toksi's wmw&L wmsmsmu 



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Speech 3 

History 5 

PE l XBfcTca&su&zism to Physical 

g&aeatioa 
Motfh. 12 or 1 
K II Skills 
Select ens 



2 
2 
3 

2 
3 
1 

JL 



Snglish 2 

Hist©i?y 6 
Zoology 1 

PS 2 Ixstsodaction to the Child 

ttass^k Physical B&2estio& 
PE 9 Btssl&h te Malta 

FK 12 Skills 

Select oaso 



2 
3 

3 



1 
3 



Ctasi&fc&y i ®22d 2 is feepiircd 
high sotseol., Others my 
«r Foreign L&s$©og@ 9 M ?< 
®l©et&ve east b© «s&d for 
tfegw? Skills villi asset 



if stadsnts fe&v® not fead ctaartstxy In 
£f?oa Ghemistcy, XfeyBles, Bacteriology 

tasgugg® is elected ham a lster 
science to aeet tl&s tfnlvesslfcy secjgitirss&st . 
hosaxe pes? usslt. 



English 23 



j i'lc 



&8eiol©gy 2S 
PS 41 tes&ois^ 
J&ssie SI 
£E 31 Skills 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Stilish 26 
Ree. L. 2& €ss# 
6evein!i£effi£: 25 
Zoology 35 ftesfc 
PS 22 Pissfc M€ 



So£< 



16 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
13 



XXI, 



PE 73 Hts&osy cM Principles o£ 
Physical IdBsestien 

Psychology 5§ Kdseae&osiei 

FE 60 Analysis of £&y£tt& 

PS S3 Physical SdssasiBa in Eiems»» 
feaiey Scbeols 

FE 51 Skills & 3tesC»lng Wfc!ao$© 

Sleet ivos 


3 

3 
3 

3 
2 

3 

I? 


PE 70 Or&anliss&ion aM Adssinistra* 
tlon of Pbysisal Educasiea 

SE 42 Kta;3&©lo$y 

PS S& M&tfeodg oi^d ^riaeigles of 
Health Etes££©a for Slesentars 
^sad Sectatay Schools 

PE 52 Skill© & Seai&ias Ktetfcoda 

SXeetive3 

Mm 


3 
3 

r 
3 
2 

6 

17 


Ed* 52 Principles & £&£&sds 

Ed. §3 SeessstoKy Sdisol teir&aatai 

Ed. S3 Practice teaching 

FE 61 Adaptive Physical S&teatioa 

PE 61 Skills & fossMsg ifefckods 


3 
3 
§ 

3 
2 

•Mrawi 


PS 74 Tests & £&asaKe&isa£s 
PB 86 Se&inar 

PS 7© Pbyaielegy ©£ tesscise 
PE 62 Skills & T&asME© S&thodo 


3 

3 
3 
2 

6 



17 



// 



1 



! 



wssxssmim ®$ m cctoses m mm 

A GBQupax&Bfm ot &be ttemz majors in the M , vis&G>a of 

gdac o ti on 



A. ©©serai &c£s soc! Sclefacss 



6. Ge&cftnl Peofessicmal BaefegsKmagE 
T» Sp&£i&li£S$ Pmfes&smsl (Xhaosy) 
S. Spadeltssod Psegoaslofflai {Skills) 



P« jfrrccties 






Sjten 




Leadership 


43 


m 


42 


21 


n 


27 


38 


%t 


23 


a 


\z 


16 


a 


6 


6 


4 





4 


9-18 


IS 


12*24 



JP.S. 1 IKEBfflRIGEZCB TO FSf£$I£H& WKSSBm Wm HMSS 

cl&sa fee&Etty l»2 tour le^etra&osy 

physical segivifty £©» tbc various &ge gmu^s fseia els® gsroi^i 

the ote^RH^e mini ss&dy th© r$&@a of 3a&& < e£u£e® f«s girls assd 
seafced In pg©g£&££2 o£ physical e6b&sfci0j& 55&?J gha ite&ssss&fcal 
chcae ^K«@v<sa&* Thmy vill &!s© efi®£i«b& sis® ss&ad, cxocdQ «a& 



Credit, 2. 

with, tha aoad for 

child £© the aalalfcs 

s asad tg©jseB 9 pre** 
skills basics to 
©pgs@r£uaifci£© ia 



?.«• 2 XraWfgfM T® M CiffiB SB OTBX€&1* ESOCmOB 



2 class hours, 1*2 himr 



C&&4i£j 2. 



Ms esmrscs Mil $©r®e to titc$B8£a£ £ha ©Seiemt $s££h «&© ach©®l child hy 
©bcer^atta* ©€ ehe child is* fete sdferoi pxagsseg, by readis^ ©I 

assd fey disctssstes® £o11&&1d$ £ke ©bsawisfetai jsari^ds. Xhe 
wtilopsmsfo a£ tie child, etatgas £a hoi$y build,, poafcar© sad «m&&v 
b& ©b&srimd cad a*?aieated« 



pso£ iaiaocy will 



P.B. 9 



2 class fcmsss. 



Credit « 2« 



ISiis ^sasrsa ate to survey eha banish psx&lasas @f sb& 
a less as&es&, Khe ccEssnaity £rasa m adtsie poisfi @f viaer. It ©ill 
s&dar £lsa &s*i©diat© psablssffi c©mfs©ssfeii^ &h& college &teta& &®& to 
thai f?2£ss© Id tsssiflagc aa4 feaily Sidfislth psobleos* 



sadi, to 
into 






I 



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a a»o 



P.B. U, 12. 32, S2c SKXUS. 

elasa teas©- 

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a&a go acejasiat £te ata«2eat ®ith a $?i«la ffss&a of aetltfltiee ?i&ieh ase aaltahle far 
$iyl© and vooea, These will iiseiede iadlvidaal sports, teas apesta aaa* oavayal 
types e£ danelag. 



P.K. 51, 52, 61, 62. S3£ffi.S ffl* SEfia 

a elass h©u*?s. 



Credit,, 2. 



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will b© ©is pxepffi&a£ie& for taaehias* Xs^seaasaat ia iadivieaal peg£aiE!&aaee will 
coatim© to be ©f ine@£@st. 



P.B. 



2 ela@® ta$K©£ 2 labesatesy taisrs< 



CEedit. 2. 




Shia csriss^ is daaigisaa* £© give sfeuteit© ©£ varying abilities inatsaetlen 
in mrias8tti& asad diviag* Itfe-aavisg., syacto>a£sad «ariL^sii^is xeesreat&a&el sfjiiming 
*ad ssstad©g fB&ta. It will pc©iiri4a statest® with hael^seeKid ssatasrial end la£osna- 
tioa fete ttill fe® helpSel to ttas ia teaahiag these fairs® ®f e$p&£iea« Gastlfiea- 
tiea as ti&fc&x Safety Xastseafc©* «ill ka es%«dad to the afeatast® gfcs mat the 
ssnto&s e£ the ^saaglaas* Bed tessa* 

?.B. 54 l£Xm8 » PRIHCXVZSS «£ BBfiESB SBMXOT FOE BUmBEftK? & «OM»T S6H9GE& 



3 elaas tesirao 

SJhis eeasae fdLil psiepaxe the fceaeSies- fas: 
elassmtasj Gad eeaeadasy eeheols. 



P.B. 60 



2 elasa ksasas 1 2-hiaar lahesa&esy pexled* 



Ccedit, 3» 

h^gfema i« 

tasdifej 3. 



tale cowae alias to aafgasisft ti&a atustet islth tee aaeiyeia oS s&yths&e 
atsaetege ©I mia&& as&i ita applleatieat to ssa&8»r aettvity, It nil! alaa dawalop 
the afciltS^EBad p-sa^reaelms© in sbptbnle oet&vit&ea £or asa in fcha elaotsntaiy asad 
saaoadasy 



3 elaaa h^iass^ 



J 



faia aasi&&& aa^aidara the oxsfla^atlan of the aahaal &f®Z®&i s tha sole of 
the taeahaff^ the aaaasees^ £aailitiaa sM the pza$vas la pfeyaleal eaaeatlaa. 

p.e« 7S axsamcr Am mmtxws m mssk^l Eii^^rxos. 

h alas© heassD* Craalt, 3, 

li«@# of 



?art I. 

IMs caairaa atea to halp the st&fcst cm^asataa4 
phyaiaal edaeatfioa hy eted^isg £fea ^avalapsaat of ph^e 
the osstaisi ^^ld* 






Part II. PaXKCOTJSSo 

j I ISae stedy o£ the philosophical ®sd ocieotifle bases ©2 te&fchisjg end losses** 

LPS €0 spliced to physical edecetiea. She ogiplleatiea of these principles to 
specific psoblesis* 

p.e. si As&mvs hksxsg&i. oaocfianKm, 

3 clacs heerso Credit, 3* 

4 censes to ecgpaiet fcfee student with the problem of exercise for perseas 
«&© ©re reet^ieted physically. A ss&dy «>£ fejpes of tasdiesfs $sm! a developsHmt of 
activities tMd* ese suitable *m$ effective la varicas siteetieas. &pfeesis will be 
pet on pestexal deviat&eas, their causes oed correct lea* 

P.K. §6 SffiSEHeft. 

3 class he@rs. Credit 9 3. 

In edditles to the eoBsideratiee of specific topics* isseledsd in the ©et« 

line below, this cessrse will eagbie the stede&ts to e&dsea©© ideas regerdiBg 
eurrcat psel»IeiBS, treads sod oppe-rtKaitles &a phyeicai cdse&tioa sad its related 
fields. Disease 2ess t?ill be iafoisaal in estese, amd it is hoped thae profeasiceal 
leaders ie varices areas of physical edsscstioa will visit the class » tfres effordiag 
stisdsete a ieisrst head vicm of oaay ©itmatiesss. 



i 



J 



The following Sabbatical Leaves arc reecsscended subject to the usual conditions 
established by the Board of Trustees: 



Ease: Dr ft. H. Kcnigberg 

Title: Assistant Professor of Zoology 

To: Softool of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Duration: Academic year 1956-S9 at half pay 

Purpose: Dr. Honigberg plans to continue else *?ork he has been doing for 
the last several years in the study of Trichcsonad parasites 
of ean and other vertebrates, ulth special reference to the 
effects v&lch these parasites have on their hosts. 



Dr. John s. Roberts 
Title: Associate Professor of Chesistry 
To: University of fteshingtoa or lorn State University 
Duration: academic year 19S8-S9 at half pay 

Purpose: Dr. Boher&s proposes to ecndscfc research dealing with fluorine 

chesdstry or rare earth chemistry. 

Keae: Dr. Hobert B. Livisgstoa 

Title: Professor of Botany 

To: Soke University 

Duration: 2nd sestester of academe year 1958-59 at full pay 

Purpose: The research problem of Dr. Livingston i&ill deal «ith the 

seasonal variation in certain soil moisture values ishich have 
been designated as soil moisture constants. 



Professor Sidney Kaplan 
Title: Assistant Professor of English 
To: Harvard University 
Duration: Fall seieester 1953 at full pay 
Purpose: Mr. Kaplan plans to cos^lete the remaining tsork on his Ph.D. 

dissertationo The subject of the dissertation is "The Those 
of Miscegenation £& American Life and Letters. n 

Dr. Helen F. Oullen 
Assistant Professor of 
One of the larger 
Second semester of ecadeisic 
To coaplete a research 



Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose: 



, probably University of Michigan 
year 1950-59 at full pay 

in Topology and function theory. 

Dr. WilllanG. O'Douaell 

Title: Professor of English 

To: The Huntington Library, San Marino, California 

Duration: Academic year 1958-59 at half pay 

Purpose: Dr. 0'Donnell c e research project is an outgrowth of a year of 

research in American literature at Harvard University in 1952- 
53. It involves the study of a group of Has? England writers 
of the nineteenth end ttzentieth centuries. 



Dr. H. L. Parley 
Title: Professor of English 
To: Hokkaido Universi^ 

duration: .A***r»&* vxrj E95S«59 

Purpose: Dr. Varley vill spend the year at Hokkaido University in Sapporo 

teaching. He expects to handle three or four courses, one in 
American literature In general, one in the African novel, one 
on a particular f igura, perhaps Emily Dickinson, and one in 
English language or conversation. 



Revised 

September 18, 1957 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1959 

DBC 
Priority 

A-9 1. School of Education and Laboratory 

Practice School $2,200,000 

(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

A-8 2. Science Center - Third Section, including 1,666,000 

furnishings and equipment and working 

drawings for Fourth Section 
(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957 

A- 10 3. Infirmary, including furnishings and 1,040,000 

equipment (Appropriation for plans, 
Chapt. 763 of the Acts of 1957) 

A-l 4. Additional Boilers, including Addition to 1,000,000 

Utility Distribution Systems, Steam, 
Electric, Water and Sewer 

B-56 5. Engineering & Physics Shops, including 800,000 

furnishings and equipment 
(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

B-59 6. Addition to Dining Commons, including 360,000 

furnishings and equipment 

B-60 7. General Maintenance Building 600,000 

(Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 763 
of the Acts of 1957) 

B-55 8. Cold Storage Laboratory, including equip- 375,000 

ment (Appropriation for plans, Chapt. 
763 of the Acts of 1957) 

C-91 9. Plans for Physical Education Building for 138,000 

Men, including furnishings, equipment 
and site improvements 

C-92 10. Plans for Natural Resources Building 55,000 

C-93 11. Poultry Plant Laboratories and Buildings 250,000 



Total $8,484,000 



2/7/58 



'i K 



February 10, 1958 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEARS 1960-64 



1960 

1. Science Center - Section 4, including $2,500,000 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Physical Education Building for Men, 2,500,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

3. Addition to Utilities - Steam, Electric, 200,000 

Water and Sewer 

4. Natural Resources Building, including furnishings, 1,000,000 

equipment and site improvements 

5. Plans for Addition to Food Technology Building 50,000 

6. Plans for Addition to Physics Building 100,000 

7. Plans for Classrooms and Offices, School of 73,000 

Business Administration 

8. Plans for Animal Science Building 100,000 

9. Plans for Engineering Building 75,000 

10. Service Building for Experiment Station, 100,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

11. Renovate Laboratories - Flint Building, 40,000 

including equipment 

12. Physical Education Fields, including drainage, 200,000 

grading and seeding 



Total $6,938,000 






CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -3- 

1963 

1. Dining Commons, including furnishings and $1,500,000 

equipment 

2. Plant Science Building & Greenhouses, including 1,650,000 

furnishings and equipment 

3. Classroom Building, including furnishings and 1,000,000 

equipment 

4. Plans for Fine Arts Building, including 100,000 

furnishings and equipment 

5. Additions to Utilities 200,000 

6. Plans for Second Addition to Library 100,000 



Total $4,550,000 

1964 

1. Second Addition to Library, including $2,000,000 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Fine Arts Building, including furnishings 2,000,000 

and equipment 

3. Addition to ROTC Building Federal Funds 

4. Addition to Utilities 200,000 

5. Plans for Graduate Science Research 150,000 

Laboratory 

6. Athletic Facilities and Fields, 500,000 

including site development, grading, 
drainage, paving, seeding, field 
structures and equipment 

7. Plans for Farm Buildings 100,000 



Total $4,950,000 



TOTAL -- CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM $29,995,000 



I 



TRUSTEE 



' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April 21, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Miss Buxton, Cashin, 
Crowley, Haigis, Hoftyzer, McNamara, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett said that because of lack of quorum, 
there was no meeting at 11:00 of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study. Therefore, the items originally scheduled for con- 
sideration by that committee would be acted on by the full Board. 

President Mather outlined the proposed changes in the 
course of study. He said that these changes are a result of re- 
views of the curriculum by the new department heads and deans. 
These changes have been carefully considered and acted upon by the 
Faculty Committees, the Provost and the President. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of new courses, 
charges and expansion of existing courses, 
deletion of course offerings, changes in 
course numbers or credits , and changes in 
course description. 

President Mather also presented changes in the program 

of graduate instruction, and it was 

VOTED : To approve changes in the graduate course 
of study in accordance with the attached 
schedule. 

President Mather reviewed current personnel changes, 
and it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached personnel actions. 

President Mather discussed his earlier recommendation 
that the University terminate its agreement with the State Depart- 
ment of Education relative to the accreditation of off- campus 



2003 



New Under- 
graduate 
Courses 



New Graduate . 
Courses 



Personnel 
Actions 



TRUSTEE 

Termination of 
Ext ens ion 
Courses off- 
campus 



Counseling 
and Testing 
Fee 



Tuition 
Fees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



courses at westover Field and at Pittsfield. He reminded the 
Board that the cooperative program in Pittsfield has been discon- 
tinued and the University is now working directly with the General 
Electric Company to provide instruction for engineers. He out- 
lined his reasons for feeling that the University should sever its 
connection with the Westover program. Copy of President Mather's 
memorandum to members of the Board under date of April 9, 1958 is 
attached to these minutes. It was 

VOTED : To authorize termination of general exten- 
sion agreements with the University Exten- 
sion Division of the Department of Educa- 
tion of the Commonwealth effective June 30, 
1958. 

The President and Treasurer presented a series of 

recommendations concerning fees, board rates, room rates and 

apartment rates. It was 

VOTE D: To establish a non- refundable Counseling 
and Testing Fee effective immediately in 
the amount of $15.00 for all freshmen 
entering the four-year program to cover 
the cost of a three-day program of academic 
advising and testing with $2.00 to be 
applied toward room rent, $4.80 toward 
board for the period and $8.20 toward the 
costs of the counseling and testing. 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the following schedule of tuition 
payments in order to equate the increased 
non-resident tuition fees established for 
September of 1958: 

Special Students - Undergraduates - $30.00 

per credit hour with maximum of $300.00 per 

semester. 

Graduate Students - $15.00 per credit hour 

with maximum of $150.00 per semester. 

Summer Schoo l - Graduate and Undergraduate 

Students - $15.00 per credit hour with a 

maximum of $150.00 for a term. 

School of Nursing - for second, third, and 

fourth years (full year programs) - $780.00. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



I 



It was 

VOTED ; To excuse the following categories of stu- 
dents from paying the Student Union Fee: 

1. All specia l students both graduate and 
undergraduate who are taking no more 
than two courses. 

2. All students who are auditing courses 
only. 

3. All students who may be exempt under 
existing policies from paying regularly 
established tuition and fees. 

4. Graduate students who are registered for 
thesis only and are not in residence. 

5. Graduate students who commute and are 
taking no more than two courses. 

It was 



VOTED: 



To increase student room rents in all dormi- 
tories from $90.00 per semester to $100.00 
per semester effective with the fall semester 
in September 195S and to adopt the attached 
schedule of rates for less than a full 
semester. 





Present Rate 


New Rate 


15 week course 


$85.00 


$94.00 


14 " 


-- 


88.00 


13 " 


— 


82.00 


12 " " 


70.00 


75.00 


11 " 


-- 


69.00 


10 " 


-- 


63.00 


9 " 


-- 


57.00 


8 " 


45.00 


50.00 


7 " 


-- 


44.00 


6 » 


35.00 


38.00 


5 " 


-- 


32.00 


4 " " 


-- 


25.00 


3 '• ii 


-- 


19.00 


2 II M 


-- 


13.00 


1 " 


6.00 


7.00 


per day 


1.00 


1.00 



It was 

VOTED : To increase board rates in all units of 
the Boarding Halls by 5 cents per meal 
effective with the fall semester in 
September 1958 in accordance with the 
following schedule. 



2005 



Student 

Union 

Fee 



Room 
Rents 



Board 
Rates 



TRUSTEE 



Rent 
Schedules 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Lotta 
Crab tree 
Fellowships 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 







Meal Ticket 


Cash 






Rate 


Rate 


Breakfast 




$ .45 


$ .45 


Lunch 




.70 


.80 


Dinner 




.90 


.95 


Per Day 




2.05 


2.20 


Per Week 


(15 Meals) 


10.25 





It was 

VOTED i To establish the following rental rates 
for the Married Student-Faculty Apart- 
ments including heat, light, water and 
sewer: 



Studio Apartments 
1- Bedroom Apartments 
2 -Bedroom Apartments 



$60.00 per month 
75.00 " 
90.00 " 



•t 



ii 



It was 



VOTED : 



To adopt the following rental schedule 

for married student apartments in Hampshire 

and Suffolk Houses effective September 1, 1958: 



1 -bedroom apartments 
2-bedroom apartments 



$45.00 per month 
55.00 " 



n 



Upon the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Scholarships and Financial Aid and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth scholarships and to 
name Commonwealth scholarship alternates 
in accordance with the attached schedule. 

Upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Graduate 

School and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award Lotta Crabtree fellowships in 
the amount of $2,000 each for the 
academic year 1958-59 to Kenneth A. Sund 
and Harold T. Handley, Jr. 

In the absence of Chairman Brett of the Trustee 

Committee on Finance, Treasurer Johnson reported the actions of 

that committee resulting from a meeting on April 8, 1958. On the 

recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it was 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve an expenditure of $300 from 
the Trust Fund Interest Account as 
partial cost for sending the Air Force 
ROTC Drill Team to Washington to compete 
in the National Drill Team Competition. 

It was 

VOTED : To allocate the income from the Hills 
Fund as follows: 

1/3 to the Department of Botany 
1/3 to the Department of Landscape 

Architecture 
1/3 to the Department of Horticulture 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize expenditure of $6,500 from 
the Trust Fund Interest Account for 
scholarships and financial aid to he 
awarded by the University Committee on 
Scholarships and Financial Aid and ex- 
penditure of $4,500 from the Trust Fund 
Interest Account as grants in aid for 
candidates approved by the University 
Athletic Council and the University 
Committee on Scholarship and Financial 
Aid. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to submit the 
following three student loans to the 
Attorney General for collection: 

Philip A. Bernard $40.00 
Arthur E. Gallant 40.00 
Edward Katz 150.00 

Chairman Bart let t said that he had requested Treasurer 

Johnson to present recommendations for the investment of $32,575 

resulting from the maturing of certain government bonds in March 

of 1958. Treasurer Johnson presented his recommendations, and it 



was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to buy for and 

in the name of the Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts the following 
common stock for the Endowment Fund of the 
University with available uninvested cash: 



2007 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Hills Fund 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Student 
Loans 



Stock 



TRUSTEE 



Monsignor 
Joseph H. 
Boutin 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



100 American Tel. & Tel. 

100 Consolidated Edison of New York 

100 Commonwealth Edison 

100 Pacific Gas & Electric 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the following resolution: 

Monsignor Joseph H. Boutin 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their sorrow in the death of 
their colleague Monsignor Joseph H. Boutin of Gardner, 
who died April 8, 1958. 

Although Monsignor Boutin's service on the Board 
was brief he gained the affection and esteem of his 
fellow members through his quiet yet effective contri- 
butions to the University program. 

» 

His good humor, his balanced wisdom, his warm per- 
sonality will be remembered by his fellow Trustees. In 
tribute to his memory, we direct that this statement be 
spread on the records of the Board. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 




)^0^^L^ 



Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



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eov&®&g?osffisy oo©o®f}&&©&a® of 90S8eBaiit3r t ^oasistititefil feiiadfttloBB of pot* 
*k«8.ift;f s popgStodynanto dflKvQXopeaat of sfcia Mrlf a peeotpiwal and cosislfclwa 
^s$$oa£§3$8 so pocsoHftXity* t&o o$fo«£ of tooiol-oBlfitttoil cosSisioBs »pm bo* 
hJBw£osr 4 peswoality twjsos ond ttaSfca, osomsootoe aapocta of bo&doleir, aval $ 
s^a»^£ of pm$®ml&ty tsotosrity* 
3 class feouso 
PHmfeBiftftt*! l?©yel&oXo3sy Si €x?oii& 8 3. 

i#CC8BU3SV fS« Xntiodtietiion to t£® fcidy el Sxcwpttonel Cb&Xdsttii* Xbe bdhmtot 
m& #dj©®tS58SBt of 4&££m®%3* $m«po ©1 J ex&sp&itaal $hM>£mm m& th& pvtib'Umu 
£&ood to wptbiits witSi theso gsoopo* fts$fefl&l* is ©^ ste toefdonao* dia&HMto., 
ottoiiBgy d**- 1 pwgwwto of ?l©^aiteS3a0 to KHS8tdl» pfeyoteal* oMioHaaetttoaal 



MKM|Bi0ttStt ffejd&Olfigy 94 09 €&ekss£ of iwamater* Cgedlt 



9 «M 



limits oa o^o ^es tm%g&®g®» 

W}M$£$$. 6S, ?£€®^ HB»t»it$»iooo0 is Snuurlacies. ^> ofevd^r «f $£$sifi«ms; Utora^y 

3 £tm@ hmv:B 

Fr8^®«|aii^ita^ J^Ei^if sfetKs^iian CvoAS£« 3« 

Sot «^©^s Z® im§Qzi$ in WK&vzk* 

HsIBSI^l' SS« ®RSt02|*l©«soo of fiooolaa ULtetosaxso is Tcsoolottosu A vooreooototlvo 

Ooio^l:lft@ will bo siysisj ftOB Sla© oI^®i«s@ of Siuotoa U't^isstieisn ood KJ.idls®j, 

FsnaDo^paivitiBs Jses£©t otaadiqg!: sfeteit® mjoriii^ to SsssaSsss viXX 

fee &&«,*2tati fee reM 9®3S3: of fete fecsfes ia ln^siloss. C»osSlft» 3» 

SBttSfXM 66* %^sielk Mwtcsirpioco® to snemolfitloa* A otwfy of tfe saost oijs»if leant 

Xltosaa^ wo'iriju £«ossa tb-o o^to Oi3d zha Msisbosto so 1lais>s^0 ^s^l Oistog® y ^sasgiS, 

S^stti^sisitsO; Jsssdoir »t«ssasSia^ Ctrod£t 9 3. 

Hog opoa to sissjotro to S^anto&* 



I 



it is «iatofffiao«MS £t*s& fcfeey o&aH be listed ia £5mk eefcal^gu:© ttadav oath ®f fcfo© 
<te%a?&:a& d^ff&a©s&®« Sbaas ©tt*mj©s will «©*saft fe tlse g&fc«atasa*® Mgov as fete 
dis&s&'g&f&a of tte ajajos 1 de^a$$sims£« Eteay &s® tc but awwiewfiwi «tei£*g £&© yea*- sfe* 

«curse £@ i&f£ese# tap fcisa fss&r&l* &£&&, 



m&isa a© ore® 

fee &£#$& f & ©tagssfiss^teesriisto ltfeotasy TO&®fc&TO8&%8»« 
3 c&ess tees© 



I 



cesss politic^*- eremite, &b$ soatei davslofMafintft te tte principal e*Hm£;»te# 
£© &£ gtoa &©a£!& ©£. tkg $eta£& 8 

£*»®s^Bi8il®»3 Aft £&a$fe esa& ©e^i^es £a ths CoilMb^ 2te3U&s 

Cmmxwm'&Zz Soctatasp* sosd £re®cssste3. Gx&&t& 9 3* 

S0&1&L 0C3MCS 6i« IiMm m$& $lmtik®m& lata, to fatfadwc»S7 ®t?«^ of racenfc 
?9i£&teal« ©c&sswtee &6ai gmttel timAopenN&s in XaA&a« ©5®$ &M mmttTim of 

3 closed liotsstt 

fteMs; ^©^©ggsse^fej, SmEsmfeSj, and Sociology* 



Ciwe&Lfc. 



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TSkst f0l£e»taB fevo etmniftB ace oddltfmol tefcndiViVrtHBfl&al oessgeea. If 

t'm mm?®® is ©ffemi for tbo fe«st& uiisD* 



ISssftftf 'Ax«bi$«efifisEtt» Bais&M^ «5®i Scstl^teie^ g^c® ilssiif^ifsy sfei^^§fe then 



sa^n 



I 



iter^s^li osafeoxy tlm^5j|#i stes piaMafe <Saw. flSolafc&OBtfbtea &@^»®ss et2£&«r&3l 

ftf«a of £&& klw Fis® 4ir£© c 

t%© ioilflwfasiB Steasi! «se®s®@® Bxm fSos slits tss^ SSa^«S«ss^s ©f As%« 
§ lotaE4ftocy to»sr© 



I 



A>1£ 4$. Vttsacco&ov* l^se^c^ory s&&dy ef te&hsssp&rs pMsl&fir fc© ^ttere^te is 4a* 
sigia m& sqFVssttBfcflftian. 
6 $$sHj?$ssB&@iy boost 
PNGBtyBSaltttt: Ast 33 mad 34 Credit, 3. 

Ml* 77 „ Ajri; of &te BgaBiesaaee. tt@ oMitdc£ttKtt a oeiiXptfiro sssl paSsSi^s <&£ Xfc&Xy 
m£ s!»ra ochre csssssfcE&as ef Hteops* 



Gbamg j BfinoiosMt of Bstiatiiia pSBsaoa 

3o niplftcd finslisfa 71, Bicgsapfey by 

E18X.XSH 7© (XX) itarlem Bi^nr^li^* tt^ dovftiopasi&t of Aa&irlcaa biography %®4 
mi^M&gTtmhf fvon ©slesiel to nodftrn tftss&s eh« teao&eiia te&wten native 
zsal&na aoA Bniop<Mttt ®X<@g$«»ii» poaogygie &od ^^bjoetivlfty*" doqpilst ion sssd 

3 $to$ tosira Cradit* 3* 

BHSUSB 71 (X) MNtaa BwmpfedA B&sgissfby* Types of blq$3K$biesX tnritiagt ttigbttmtli 
esasfcesy focoQfUbtewiQg ©* ao&era sonves-; the ninetoosttii eoatnsy otunddird life 
assd tisffi®* tttaatleth etatusy frauds?, toc3ui&|BM of dM ssw^ltefc «sd dmHtatlst 
i& fciogsttfitiy, apprettdiM to tSae 8fi98ftM*>oC«Mfemiitoioa99e69 tB&thod* 

Siws in $I&«a&i@ years* 

3 ate® haaxs Ccodit« 3* 

To sagtlnee Hisfcosy 91, Ses&B&ir, find 92 • BtotwriagiflpibEy fey 

EX8XCW f§ CI) and (XX) Blbliescapny' cssd nistosicisrqphy. Xtw&mis&tai in 
bifeliqgMBay and av&luatica ef aaavao aatevialas ©rltieal omafatsKloB s 

cspaaaas&ativa hiatcviaaa fwia aseiaf^: to ®©dera feims* 

3 a&aaa beers ■ fc&4ifc$ 3* 

*£& tt&Uuoia 1fo&9U» Z7 and 2§* Cfo&araX l?bysica (for «a©ifiaa«i) by 



F8XSX6S S. Gaaaral Sbyaiea. MeciiUBilQS* 
2 eliss bmara, eaa Z bpwr X4fe»*&£«] 
ODiMtiaittt: HBtbeaasiea 5 



Credit * 3, 



?BSSXG8 d, Clem&r®$. fbytice* Primarily tlaetrieity ®a$ wmg^sZlLmtti a few aalaat&d 



ass 



j/VsAti «s<M 



s, w.'t«S» e 



Z ®tm® fasmrn? ©as 2. boor Xdbosetesy 



Groat*, 3 



s«a$&0fi sss ©polled fe© light wd. s«w.m<l fr 

Coro^Bisittt: MKtbeasBtlea 31 Credit, 4. 



v £o d&s%&&&e m T&yt&u&l&fgp 2? t&oae »©eti«w&» ©f Sfcydaelcsgy ^^ «Mch 
s&c? &a?$$3t wieh 2 class® hmss &&& o?ae 3 htwisr XaWr&tOTy* 0ot& £otts» 
cMSsswt^ 3 evtdltw* & dlffero* <&s%oafei©K» is dasliraad fca isesiSce it 
pcr$fi?M@ fco.e&aaels ssheftlser psyeholosy Mjevii k®m te$ t&st iabcwratospy 
Socm oi i©tsr©<tat©:ry csevcac. 

To ssepXesea P^ycliols^ 51, ^3is^@sifflS»isiCfe3L F^yeka'tegy^ by 

PST£H0IiBY 51 « feasor^ ood tofci^ettos®! ^TO43S»s©8, A at©d£ ©g fc&® data, 

the$n:ia& ass&dl Che sstbods of ixmmKi^»tien ©f Aooaesyo, fSEeepSnai, eaotioftal 

s&£ lOttiwi&iiMiiil frgecasftas* 

2 chz&$ hocff«, 1 3-Swmr laboKOtesy 

PteceQttiolte: Foyefcioiegy 26 CTO&&t e 3. 

^MCBiMMZt 52, tosfflaig^ *K&d Xhinfeiqg. A c©&*ri&&rA&&©& $£ tfce ©££sc£«i of practice 
.s.r;rl conditions of practice &n scq&i® ££!<&&» generalisatiett* 4i«cariniiiAtlOB v 
fcftMftCtev* ret«tte& &od es&iiacticm g&K©e©#sS4&® £ss eitttd&lOfHi ?6X!®£8& ftm 
fswlcvis© coisditioiiiiig to preblea saivis^;, 
2 class taws* 1 3«lkOttS' lafoovotofy 
?ins3MH|ni9it«t Feycthelcgj? 26 Credit* 3« 

Tq m$lm® 3?i&'3?cfe@lcg3r $5 aod $6„ Fvefeleie In ?ss*Si©l«s8jy, fey 

9SSCBCK06SE 9? (I), 9& CXI).. Fsroblesis la FeyefcoiotBy, For qpftUfted ee»l*Y». 5&e 

gtosdeait will be allc%ed to do isdfdfssiiiaat <norle end a&?#% #si ©facial pmbtess 
osr is certa&a £i«ldc «©£ pa^cbologieol is?;$z#$&o JSj g^mpsssmt taitSi tbe 
$jg£@k&$@ <©:2 tfte dqpastfluat* Credit, I«3< 



G0UJB8 €4? AGS 

/CBXftfflESBAA mXBBKBIHS 75. tesa StCttetowea sod Related Esplpstet, A atwti? <&i 
the £wMmm&j&i eepecte @i plasties nodecn £em eftfitelHvee with eapbseii! <m 

pisses «t$e» ■ e*wit#Esaasi$&&I ^©t^pl^ tbe tttility eyefcea* eelectloe ®M eee of 
related s&&&lta&£c&l M&tf elw&rtail eqpiipaBKt, B8tttvl>is «f coofitcveticia swtsS 




1 teetwMi; 2 2*hBNir lab»yat©iy poviods. CxsM&it 9 3^ 



FOSBSBES' f4 Cl^)« Mrsss'isel FoTttst Hvmtiinttiiott* Shft ©saly^ln ©f gsesiftls s»i yield 
pl®%l@.%,& «r»i®is^i and c^ffitizssose fowast iuwantosyi pis^ssnstEBe^ atatidties as 

Pie&cqpiBita, Forest »y SS Credit ff 3* 



u 



FORESTS! 73 (II) • Ita&or Manufacture and Distribution. The lu&bor industry; 
sailling and preesssiss^* I03 mid its&bar grading, loaber storage and distri- 

3 class hours Credit* 3. 

KOETICOSOTIE 79 (IK Seminar. For seniors specialising la floriculture* 

olericulture osd $asmlo®& 

1 class hour Credit* I. 

FOuXSBX MtISB&S®EY 25 (I). Introductory Poultry tgeea^eEESnt . &a lefcrodactoffy course 
present ir& basic production gseassastaait for ccs&esrcial poultry operations. To 
i&elude fcotehosy ssanagensiit* bxeediag as4 reariss* disease control, Itasissg 
and efeiposst, and s&nagesxsea pregcass for broiler and ecssaerctol eggs. 
Class hears: 1 f*sur laboratory period Credit, 3« 

P8ULTW ITOSBAmS^ 63 <X>. Poultry Biology. A course to acfBaiat the student with 
tfee specific biological attributes of the domestic £Ml» Ba^hosis is placed 
©a asistcs^ cad physiology ©2 the' digestive* reprodactiiwa assd endocrine ays teas 
end specific physiological raapoesas to ervirooesestsl ia£l«e&ees are presented. 

2 class hears a 1 2«faour laboratory period Credit v 3» 
Glvoa in altereete years 

POOtSBS: SDSSA&JSg 79 CD & (II). Poultry Prohlesss. This cotts© is designed to 

ello& students to purses* independent study in specific subject areas in* 
veiling either catena ivo literature resist? or an eaperis&ntai approach to a 
specific probles. Tbe credit elletied tssuld be fro© 1 to 3 credits* 
Class beers by erraesdsssat Credits, 1*2,3. 

Delete Free* toilers ity Course Offerings 

%rtaEiteral ES&sinearisg 72 - Dra&aage <sai Irrigation Eh 

Agricultural Engineering 74 • F ana Structures 

Plant Breedi&g 31 end 02 - Special Problem* 

Poultry BaabosMSry 25 - Geaeral Poultry 

Poultry l&sshaadry 32 -Incubetloa esad Breeding 

F@&lfcry Husbandry 53 - Poultry Judging 

Poultry Kesbasiry 5$ - Housing and Sanitation 



Poultry Bssbandry 7® to 62 

Poultry Husbandry 56 to 73 

Chasso I© Ka^er And Credit 

Poultry Husbandry 7$ to 65 - ieereas&d frcsa 2 to 3 credits and £rea 1 class 

Eeer p 1 2~haur laboratory to 2 el ess hours and 
t 2-he« leboratery. 

Chosae In ftos&er &od Course Oeserintioa 

rT[lun-Hi'»i~ii".r i iin-nrTTrirT> %-iwrtmnt in-m TtTnn**T*Vr tn -T-n.t— ffrrfnimrTiiTn mr rr.i t-i"n~iTrrrimmf'j , i , ']i<TiliTrii)irri>i"iititrrtMrnin. nn 

Forestry 76 - V!®®& Tecbaology - to Forestry 52 » Properties of Hscd. !Eha 
physical ei&t ctenical characteristics of ^sood in relation to its use; the 
lt£lim-®m &£ growith apoa m»ed prspertiess sssthotls ©f testing* 
3 class hours Credit* 3« 



Qnm$® la Qoaxoft Boocrtotieiii 

'■■..■-. ,'. . :, . ■ :wj:-v.'.-,v,\i lV . „-.u: v-.i.j. . ;< MM ■■■'. tWM u ■--■■ iiout ntriu 



* 7oxo8& 2*s?ota$fca • A tntsvoy os tfciB ptfiaslpOi foseot ptedBCtSj 



«wmiM9MimHHUtfM4flaafBCiiunartw»a raw 

tb&it? aaaBfaetiuNi esse <Uat?£kiifc6ott« 



Csr©4ifc„ 3. 



3 O&S&S 
FoRootgy .lis 



1.4 ■• $»od &mmm&m& cod S*eea<nrv«fi£oii - F^»e^isg god iUs s®« 

Ig&tai $0 <&y£E© ssh& psosttra&lo&i choosy and p*?sct&«a eS -sis- ©easi« lln 

3 (Biffins teas* Csodlt, 3. 



wtgiCTAdiKGHRairoagnMUANffBinMSiiMvun^ 



OTTO 08 983SB88 J^ltnSHUffXOR 



*&t\»&f?f4t$\trj l w£tiiVkt\wii?Wii!i,\*jw 



K^O^ffiXW 37 €0- SnEtodaetteR to itafoonl 






Susses 



^waibot eoovflwi &© coabfti 



Credit. S* 



FX53a$CB 76 {XX} » Sfi£a Xboohhudo. Xho qppliest&ton of life insttsaace to G&® prs&l&ss 
of ianlly MMKrifcy* &«&f&eso soiratrffcy,, iBvoramito ossd oo&®&© pcotootlORL 
3 cloes famsm Credit, 3« 

I® ?is$s$© ?$„ tlw U»fera&l»2? Coss2"0O of gtodjy Ctaa&t&ess dtog|84 tfea 
tok! ULfltt t«> giosao&ol la tito c®s.vf5ss doocvlsttenu 

FIMMSS St Cll)« PnblOMB la Bs$®;tes?s Fiss^aaaa 11. A &®m metal spgnaMHdt to 

ams^slstl timzi&imm Mfclng in thm mim&imi of tho Is^al £os» of taoisMo 
ei^KatosSiiy®£» 9 X«s%*$ow& ffiMseiog, moosTOa m& il&vi*fcti policy, po&ota$s s 

OgOgtiBRg? ©S&p&SBSt©©,, S8SS£g®3?» O&i 80«p&©&tiOi3l8 0®$ tttOS^OniMtfOO* 

3 ©isas© torn* Creitfc, 9, 

WfM'm^Smttmz, Fiossso© $S oM 8&« 

El&&*SS&@$&£ ft? {x)« iteaiBOBBBBiK ossd U&ioss Hlo1La&&«©* Bs^JLoally thio &«ri®o to o 
os^ti$&ioo& of &ftlo»*mas^aW8i5& objoBgivRo, £s®§&f«© ^s^ «&K'sefe$«® i&e&tttfiag 

&tm 4*«®sj@ e h^iet of aatos f«aB^ig^i€?s I'st© mr®^^ of asEBnQiBBMKSt ^^eaosf^sjo 

aasi 4igfSJu^e aasls^^Et; milt ha stsifiei 

3 ol^@ boots* 

?8©ao!g»4sift«»! BBMQOBBBafe ol 9 64 or Icoisorfes ?f« 



fetiMtj 3, 



ooo3&ia&8&&n$ o sories of ^to&'S&i^e feKSlsloss® e^^atli^ to a pits® €ntch will 
ootms^@^l.^ tttilix* eespoBOfeB fnailittes isnl i^@.ylst^ tba oir^esrXy «(^wmsst 



W^SMWB ?t fl| s '^olo©®lis^!« A oosrroy of tlso field of vfe0lAMtlSai8 9 tj^oa ®.o^ 

elosoos of ©Kgaaiso&ioas ar^ os®Soiro 9 tho osgooiofiSrSotsi «o^ sMSB^^ssssat of iSsolO" 
s$!$( osstMnllsteoiit iaolodis^ ft ; ^t®a@fe^ ffi&d aoXX&wgg aetivitlMi* 

3 0I&SS9 fedsns Cso<S-it s 



.-*. 



j^t(V.i**^v-i'*A^iM\fwiAtwjis»-*r.Att:Ji*ito*fti.*iw.vw(ir;r?f/iiiW'.''-ar*ft 






2 elffiss tfiotass* Ccedit, 3« 

3 3UBoosdttCNEy Imwc! 

CXTO* UBB5B8BXN9 $2 CIX). g^jteeesrilssg Meri&lr** A »&*&% of aRgii&su&siaas sssSmseIj&I© 
«&& gtiag&lailo? csap^sai® ot> flUM^uiBieial ptopertlfia* ldh®t®&®£% «ke©s$£$s® &&© 

2 cla&s fcfxaw; 1 ;>&©«?? I&btn*&£«y period ®m$&& a 3. 

P^®a^ss£®i^2 Civil B^gtatsifisss S3» 

CTrXL SBSXnSKlIieB 74 CXX>. Saw^f of Btmcsare© III. fas «ily»i» and <$m&$& of 
ccs^Xcss sw? ©P&&&&1 sesne&oBQS fca flstalf c©&&:£«te oar wsat« 

■ -:,tia££e®: Glvil '®3Kgi«Mslnfj. 7X« ?2j> IS (erafinsMHBftly) 

C29XL H»X®»M St <I), COO- C&viX BqgtaMfflng PsojaOK* amostiatttiOB of a 

£mis®ip£®££;&2 &i?@r«ge of $•© ffe* psooftdiqg I ®©M®te» €mMX a 3 

phm pttuScalon of dbpsxcaBHfc* fi «e 2 s«&$t@3r&) or S 

£SSEA|?XCiL SHBXBBESESXaB $3*. Steuagpqgfesr. Tto eoosoo attl gto ft&a fttodaat © W3&- 

pro$&#&taa$l db£ff£&* Tie voo of A&toradttNsfcs in £te e*»&it*«ti« of tiO^msamt 
elsggts ulil b© inclisdod. Ibo «g@&r$® will bo effMKd as ®» ®!o«s&£w &$ all 
BO&lositt- •»* will £m$lw& i^ie*mr^ and pvwtim* 

1 ©l$o$f k$ar; I B^ttou* IA@3r®i»2y -yeslod* Cgodlft* %.> 

s^ ps-iisai^les of smwfeoc pb^ies mndl is swrmsj of |tss&l®® i-csvolin^ iss felt© 

CSutafflB Im C^$#Sa Hmnao ^b*I Couanio .fes^slpti^sa 

7XL miBBBBXRB 70 C^^» 4 to 3 i».h.} €E 70 CH)* fte©^ ®^ StTOCto^^i I. 
&& ©ICK^f&arf tTWftsafime of st-:: Ilf i&stereiisa^© sti^saat^s ®spesislly 

2 ci^ss hoows-l 3?*toa^ ItibocaeiMey f^ri^4 Cteodis 






*9«* 

CIVIL ESgSBSKEOT 78 (from 4 to 3 o.li.) €B 78 (I) Sanitary 2asiaserlt$ II 
This course deals with master essd csasa^© laboratory analysis, stream 
pollution^ voter and ©es&a&e tiraateant, aM worfes esd industrial uasfce preMeeaSi. 
2 class taisre; 2 3-hour laboratory period Credit, 3* 

Prereijaieit©: Civil E'-egimcriefj 75 cocfiarron&ly. 

S^lete Feosb 1*niver»ity Course 0££erinR8 

Civil Ssssisseerias 51 (replaced by €S S3) 
Civil Esginsaring 61 (to be replaced by GS 62) 

toler.e and gshstitute 

Belet© HSBehsnical Bngieeerins 2?, ^&ldis@ Shop, 3 er.) 

Hsehanical Ssgtaerigsg 2$, Sfiaehine Step, 3 cr*) a&$ sebstitets 



3BH0BtXI& W. BSatel S&cM&is^ end !feldis$. The readsaoantels eg 
oeciii&isg ead ssatai weldis® Mil be presented thaeogjb the use of basis 

nssbias tools asi ©amial raiding of varices ra&tals ia the laboratory, lactoses 
«ill be d&wtad to the theory ®t cssta! catting and joiaisn. 

2 ©less hosrss 2 3*heer laboratory paries . Grsdit, 4. 

Belete IS&ctaatcal Ssgimerisg 37 , "&m±% Bs@iseer&a@ Ma£erials 9 3 cr.) 

Industrial BaQisoerit® 25, tSosu£eeteri»s Processes, 2 ©r» ) end substitute 

S^CI&SiX€&& EB&XHSEBX!® 35 • Baaic SnginserlBg; ££eterials end Processes. The eeurse 

will cows* the properties, testis^ end processing of teste engineering sss&terials, 

failete by inelastic action, cr©$p, £sti$ce &sd corrosion* Basic sssmfact^siE® 
processes fier «o©d, stone, clay pg^tosts, esissnts, plasties, robber e&d p&sx&s will 
be ce^erede 

3 class hears 5 1 3-b«r laboratory period Credit, 4 
Prere^eisites: Ctasistry % or 4$ I%ys£es 3, tahea provieesly 

or esnserres&lye 



*»Wj/WXXEKZMiVivtr*i-zxi\aHmmimnK UMBfrrWtaii Braw*Mnilw»MitBWWO»aciWHp|» 



P. So 3, Efaysieal Bducatioe credit 1 b@ cheated to: 
F e E e 1 9 (b^ Physical Sdacafcien credit 1 
To S. 2, (1$ Physical Edeestiea credit I 

P„ S* 4, Shysieel B&seafcioa credit 1 be chested to: 

P„ B« 3, C^ Hiyoiesl g«taa£tas credit 1 

P. E„ 4* C®) Bij@iesl l^teestioa en^it 1 

Po En 33 j Bsjstasi Sdsestiofi &ic^i,t I be Ghssged to: 
Po Eo 31, ^sj> Bi^©leel Eclxsessi^a credit 1 
Po S. 32. 6sd Phyeicel Sdocstiea credit X 



P e B. 34, £ta.^ttieal Bdocstioe credit 1 h® chassed to: 

P« B« 3$ , (e) Ehysicel E<fecati©si ensdit 1 
' P. B* 34, W K^ysieel Sdtsea&is& c«<Sit 1 



P. B. 57, Mee&octe sr^ Materials s Ca&dh&ssg Saaefeall aae 1 Gyoassfcica ba ctas&ad t©j 
P« E a 5? Kafctal© ©»*a Egfitesiala'; GoaaMcg Bastiball credit 1 

Po E. &l Kafcte&s assd Mafcesicl©! Coaehiias Gy^aaatics csrcdit 1 

P. S. 58, B&fc&o^a ££$ BSa&esrJlffilas CaaaMs® Tr&ck fl Football fee aaaqged fco: 
P. B» $8 Hatbotia ang M&SOTlaiss €a*K&££3S Ts&e!- credit I 
P„ S* 6® Msttala a&d tsattfnr&alos Coselritag ?eo£ball csedic 1 

P. E* 88, t§e&&©4e «nd ssatoKieda; Gaacb&ag Soac&s, BaaSEetbalX fee chafed tot 
P. s« 62 Ksdbeds m$ sgat&ffi&las Caaatalsu Saceas czedift I 
Pa So 66 ffistbcds sad Ma&es£els$ CSoaelsiia^ Bastefo&H esedts 1 

P. E. 7 9 Ifaysie&l E&cat£oa csedftt 2 fee coasted to: 

?• $* 5, C^) Ftijaieal Efe&tta ereiig 1 
P. E* 7, (a) fl^fitcal Ute&fcto es&dlt I 

P« B* 8, P&2?©ical £fesa£i*» c&edit 2 be dtoged to: 
P c E* 6, (w) P2&?siaal Eslsaas&ss esadit I 
P« E„ 8, (a) H&ysieal Bdaeatiosi i 



P* E, 25? t Haysiaal B«teat&*m esadit 2 b© abaaged toi 
P» E. 25, (w) Physical Eteattea credit 1 
P. E. 27, (w) Sbyalaal E&seotio& csedit 1 



P« B» 28* Pfiyaieal E*teasi« credit 2 ba daasged to: 
P« E» 26, {«$ Ptqraieal I^aatta credit 1 
P S« 28, (n) JtiysiaaX Bduca&ion e&adit I 



To be considered at the meeting of the University of Massachusetts, 
Board of Trustees* Meeting, April 21, 1958 



Food Distribution Major 

(Proposal to University Course of Study Committee 
for new major program in College of Agriculture) 

I. Background and Justification . 

Since March 1956 the Marketing Committee in the College of Agriculture has 
studied means of bringing together the facilities and resources presently 
available in the University for offering a program of study focusing directly 
on food distribution. For the five million people in Massachusetts, expendi- 
tures for food are probably their principal concern. The efficient distribution 
of this food calls for considerable integration of resources and knowledge 
such as transportation, channels of trade, characteristics of perishables, 
selection of species, packaging, grades and standards, consumer acceptance, 
personnel management, salesmanship, etc. The Marketing Committee has developed 
the attached program which brings together existing courses into a new major 
designed to fill a need which has already been expressed. 

II. Organizations Requesting Such a Program . 

Meetings have been held with representatives of the New England Association of 
Retail Grocers and the National Association of Food Chains. Both groups have 
shown great interest and have indicated the urgency of establishing this 
curriculum as soon as possible. Both groups have patronized heavily the program 
now in operation at Michigan State University. 

III. Cooperating Departments . 

The following departments in the College of Agriculture would be involved: 
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Dairy and Animal Science, 
Food Technology, and Horticulture, The School of Business will be drawn upon 
for several courses. 

IV. Administration of Program . 

The Food Distribution major would be described in the University catalog as an 
option of the Department of Agricultural Economics, with the head of that 
department serving as advisor. Relationships with the Dean of Agriculture would 
be the same as for other majors. The Marketing Committee of the College of 
Agriculture would review curriculum changes if needed, and function as liaison 
between the University and industry. 

V. Degree . 

The degree of Bachelor of Science would be awarded after completion of this program, 

VI. Status of Approval . 

After approval was given by the College of Agriculture Course of Study Committee, 
final approval was then given by the College of Agriculture at the Heads of 
Department meeting on February 20, 1958. Referral is hereby made to the 
University Course of Study Committee, 



.( , 



PROPOSED CURRICULUM FOR FOOD DISTRIBUTION MAJOR 



College of Agriculture 
The following courses are all listed in the present University catalog: 



First Semester 

English 1 
Speech 3 
Chemistry 1 
Mathematics 1 
Botany 1 
Agriculture 1 

Third Semester 

English 25 

Government 25 or History 5, 6, 59 or 60 

Bacteriology 31 

Economics 25 

Elective 

Fifth Semester 

■■■«!■■ i ■ i i * waml 

Marketing 73 - Advertising 

Ag. Econ. 55 - Marketing Food Products 

Olericulture 73 - Produce Marketing 

Practice 
Electives, 2 courses 



Seventh Semester 

Poultry 75 - Marketing Poultry Products 
Marketing 71 - Retail Merchandising 
Econ, 55 - Economics of Consumption 
Electives, 2 courses 



Second Semester 

English 2 
Speech 4 
Chemistry 2 
Mathematics 2 or 4 
Zoology 1 
Horticulture 2 

Fourth Semester 

English 26 

Accounting 25 

Psychology 26 or Sociology 28 

Agricultural Economics 26 

Elective 

Sixth Semester 

Olericulture 74 - Merchandising of 

Perishables 
Marketing 54 - Salesmanship and 

Sales Management 
Food Tech. 75 - Food Preservation 
Electives, 2 courses 

Eighth Semester 

Ind. Adm. 64 - Personnel Mgt. 
Ag. Eng. 80 - Food process Eng. 
An. Hus. 54 - Meat Processing 
Electives, 2 courses 



The choice of electives is the responsibility of the major adviser. 



Suggested Electives : 



Dairy 25 - General Dairying 

Econ. 26 - Problems of the National 

Economy 
Ind. Adm. 63 - Management in Industry 
Ind. Adm. 73 - Advertising 
Entomology 26 - General 



Ag. Econ. 56 - The Fundamentals of 

Cooperation 

Stat. 79 - Elementary Economics 
Statistics 

Business Law - 70 

Ind. Adm. 66 - Transportation and 

Traffic 

or appropriate specialized courses 

in commodity departments. 



At least six credits must be taken in the College of Arts and Science during the 
Junior-Senior years. One summer of placement training is required. 



Approved by Department Heads 2/20/58 






1>uU.Vtt > «.«'l9U>1Mk>'.«(4i#»-* 



§!&» @%rata&® School Cfi^sdl &o^En»{§@ to feho $wmi$m& €m& Vmsi&ms tht 
it o wmwj:®^ in Hivsies l«adioit to tfctt Wmt&s of $ci£B&& itaagjso. Iftao 



g£0&tJ>&S Ofcsta&O ©aly: 






f MZ* ra«$I€&t, TWm'm^ Topio £ss £&e i &6&1 pbysl«B # wifcfe 
s&ls e< logical ttMAumlett (taaefctwds of S^^asige^ SnilcoB, «sia«3 
Jese&i) ml 33% aloe bie £&e!'$s In «JJs&i«5SOfS8 ssa$&&. 

■■;?« cl£$$ fcousow 

211. mmm$B m QWOT3 mm%» n^ otaHBaCfl ®t vm® m«tea£oa a 
saf&a 8metor&ie@$ mS tstunttCensetiott eiioosy, 

3b&M olOM lS00#©. 

mcjoiolte: e$ 101 • CsotHfc* % 



•) 



212. ZOBCBSBXXCftli mCMm «$K£JS* Application of «p?aa&wa thes^y £© 

&®$»&&$ is £;^gls^ phyoiiooi 

S&soo oleo® tanm* 

Sstto^pteifcdi's Jfitys&co $11. Cstt4£fc» 3,. 

300a stani, w.m:m*& stan. BteposinwcAi ®t ttamfciooi wxfe i» 

jwspsrasfcos* of aa oecofttflfelfe t&ftBio* €re«4££j 6* 

3 ®RW$m&® Sdfcool Gomoeil z&zm&^m t® %$m %smt$mt s®d Tzmtm® & r a@ 
tpptwietiL of a ystirai fe£ @©¥e^£se^t Issuing to ^1s® t&stcs of &&&- 4cseio« iEbo 






IS©* BI&I^ &MMraffi€m« 4 ^tas^r of oelaeftati fs^nlesaa im ps&iie 
&s^£ro$&on< &E$feoo£a vUl &o piocod open ^s^ii5:j$ «sfe^sa^ «&%fes 
fe tbi ®$ oacb statest: vill va \ rccSeo & commbscIb prajsct* 

Pcomgnioifcoos OovwraoftRt 161 &*r l?$ 3 Cs«dit» 3» 

2&3* !MOT£ SBiOBUBESS CBT' SRH M, %WmimB &MJ WWmMB m$XU&* 

to eat&l^ala of s^jss of tbR rmj<®s pcoblonB to fe^^r^^sissisl coloftiooB 

Ftr Lteo: $sw« ox 173 or 174a ■ Circuit ., 3* 

Uft4qg \J© ABaev£ceo ^ol&f;£c9 fl p©lit£« BSt&aagi 9 olactiona ^s^ CM 

fit Ml g*^*^&&» of fin • 
04MH »lo tfaoo£o« €{■'•' ■: 6o 



to>oiBtBO ®ts A bove tfiaioautt 

^ ^-J^ iTiMi^wiiw^wiiir^irifwna^OTiiiraiWittiini-i-r rrr---fr'rninnvr 



k> Cfa&rlee E., Jr.., isesociat© Professor o£ Civil 5egineerifl$» 
effective geptes&er 1, 1958 et #&,$$! pss year (4 stc#s above 
sstSaisms^. B.S. isa €.E. tfoivessity ©2 Verssoet; 3*$l„ is C.E. oko' 
Se«S« SiesseeSi&sefets Institute of Tec%aelo$y. Xestsuete? is Civil 
B^gisaaeriog et SMvefsl&y of HassecSsasetts X949»5l3 Ses&or Hy£ro~ 
«3Sy8&saics Bosiaeer at £&e diem* !». Mersis tof>«s&y £& SeXtisBsre 1955* 
56 ea& i&ile ttare served es Instructor of Applied Mscfeesics at 
Je&se So^Mss IF&iver&ityj Beseaxch associate in Hydarssl£cs 9 B&ods 
Hoi© (teeaso&raphie X&sti&otistt 1956 to dote* 

CBS, Pao Lua» Associate ta>fsssser of ffii2esaca s effective 
S®^tG2^er 1 3 1958 at $& S 9®X g?er year C4 step© £ta?e &&&i&u2$ • 
B«S» SatieBfiX Chifio-teg I&iversity CC&toSs IS. A. diversity of 
Missouri-, Stud* feiversity e£ Ifisco&sia. Isstssctor is* E&o&omics, 
University of tfiesmsrl 1949-SXs assistant Fsofesse? of Sssisees 
aad ta©sm&cs d University of &o£&8 1954-57 j Lecturer at ffi&d&m 
State University 195? to &s&&« 



&£&ert g., Msifltesfi Stesasarer, of ££, effective Jeiy 1, 

1950 as ^§8,050 per year (4 steps a&ove e£&fes$'. &*3. E&rltas 
Colleges ££•£• University of Illinois. Certifies ftsblia AcceeataE&. 

Chief Accee&tant lerllsss ©©lies© 19&7»5X$ Jm$®% tesoasstOBt Uni- 
versity of Illinois {hel£«tta basis vStile ts&s&iq} for ssster's 
degree) 1951-53 5 ^tsoltox' sural University 1953-54$ .Scpervisis® 
$ceeentant$idversity of Xilfeoi© 1954*56; GostrollG? ^feylead 
AeaiasgF 1956 to present* 

ESZ3&, Seetolpn Barele 1 , tooeis&e Professor of Fisassce, effective 
Sa^tesfee? X 5 1958 at '$7*52? per year C&s%i2&&)« Educated in 
Gexesaa Sslseels* Best seven yeers -of CSradnate Ssn&y on& received 
tbo degree of Doctor of Jisrisproctase in 1929 at Friedricfe Wilteto 
University* Various ipsittats in basks eztd ixistsresee eor^ssiee 
1922*29} ^08ietes!t Qitj l&m^er eo^l City SSmagor £a tee 6eesae 
cities - 1929-33 { Erssecatlve Vice*?res£^eet of the Accouisti^s 
Advisory Corporetioe of Berlin 1933-36$ ^ccoimteat for l&BiCkeri»ec&er 
¥ill$S8 ©Dorset ive, lac. CBsf5f Yol%) 1937-3B; Professor of Ecoisossiea 
g®& Besics&ee ASai&i0tretien s Lsstter CSoilege (Xo^s) 1939-46; 
Frofesser of Sc^sc^ies end Ihxsisess Afeissietretiea end Eeed of t&o 
BQi&ar&saKt, Sst&esjy Collese (W&&& Virgiaia) 19^6 to €^:@. 



a2*Y, Jote H. 9 Hes^ of ^spertsssBt SS A ? % BetosaeXogy iaE«i Plcsst 
Tst&elogy, effective 3mm 1S 9 X9S3 at $10 9 S@2 ^@s? year (5 stsps 
aJbcAFQ siniesctsB)* B.S. Uslvereity of Risceseie, FIj ? P. lasivereity 
of fiiocoasin* Beceereb ^esietasst, Xaotrector, ^ssietest Professor 
ossi Associate Frofeesor, respectively » et t!se Bsivessity of - 
Hteceosie 1931 to 194@« Professor of SBtossoiosy lotm Stete College 
1948 to Sete. 



IM^X^* Elchard So 9 Assistant Professor of Bcaaontod, effective 
September I, 1953 at §§ 9 G06 per yes? (4 steps above esLeiisBD) . 
B,S. Harvard University; II* S. Goraell; espects doctor's -degree 
in 1953. Ors&iate Assistant isthe Sex? York State School of In- 
dustrial and Labor delations 1951-525 S&tension teacher for the 
University of &entuelsy 1953; eraduate Assistant in the Hew York 
State School of Industrial and Labor Relations If 54-55$ Teacains 
Assistant in. the Itepartisest of Economics Cornell University 1955* 
57. It is cnderstood tfeat if fee. does not have Mo &|grea by 
Septes^er, he Mil be employed at a salary of $5 9 53§ (2 steps 
above ts&nlEu?) rather t&aa $e 9 ©®6 sou cee o aBB Cg dsd* 

MSSISS^ S Beaald a.- Assistant Professor of Arts, effective 

Septesker 1, 1958 at §S 9 S38 per year (2 steps above srlnfcsns) . 
B.S. Best Point. Sotted f cod the regular an^ as a Colonel in 
1847. Goscico&d training, receiving M.A. in Fine Arts froa 
University of Michigan. Served one year (1952-53) as Director of 
the West Boint S&iseesi; Instructor University of ©islahcm 1956*57. 

B5fflg® 9 Billies Jesses, Associate Professor M 4 n , Poultry EBsbandry, 
effective Jaly 1, 1958 at $8,372 'per year (5 steps a&ove ssiaisas®), 

B.S.. University of Massachusetts; H.8. and P&cB. C&rnell University. 
Assistant Processor at Cornell after graduations Assistant and 
Associate Professor in Boultry Physiology at the University of 
Belesssre since July 1953. 

PECS, ' John S. , Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering (Assistant 
Professor), effective September 1 9 1958 at §§ 9 24© per year (5 steps 
above ' ©inifsxsa) c . C.E., M.A«, ami Fh„I&„ degrees frea Celus&ia 
University. Professor of Civil Engineering at the City College 

of Ket? York taore than 25 years 9 and is ms& retiring from that 



EiJSSSLL, ' Richard Henderson, Instructor 1b History (Visiting 
lecturer) during leave of absence tsithout pay for one year of ' 
William F. fleehrlia,, effective Sopteifeer 1, 195S at $5,356' per 
year (5 steps above etiaisguBi)* . S.B. asd M.A. Harvard University. 

Teacher at Restore Michigan diversity 1946; Teaching Fellow at 

Harvard 1949-51; ami since 1952 lias taught ia the History Depart- 

scat at &s&e&9t College ^ith the ean& of Assistant Professor. 

SI&HSG&, Joe Uilliass, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, effective 

September 1, 195® at $S 9 3®4 per year (1 step above ©ialssum). 
&.B. and Mc& a Southern SSetfeed&st liteivereity; l-LA Harvard; espects 
Ph»©. fre© Harvard in June 1953. Assistant to Professor B. C. ' 
Ifiiliess in advanced courses esd three years teaching philosophy 

in general education program at Harvard. 



BUsinstatjaaeafc and Merit Step Increase 



HCfEHS, Walter 9 Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
effective Septes&er 1, 19S8 from |S 9 ©70 to |5 9 53S (2 steps above 

©inissaa) • 



!, John H« , Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, 

effective' Septe^or 1 9 1958 from |6 P C60 to $7,527 (wgzisam). 



&ein statciaBnt a Preaeotlon and Sfsri t .S tep Increase 

HHKHSS0$3 8 Thomas 0. , f ros Instructor to Assistant Professor o£ 
Sociology, effective September 1, 1958 frees $4,94© to $5,474 



Iterit Iscreasao 



DXStSBR, Ifcsdsll P., Assistant Professor "A", Seed Laboratory, 
effective March 9, 19S8 fro© $6,708 to $6, $31 (4 steps above 
fsLfiisss&O • 

EASTWOOD, ffisifred I», Professor "A", Hoess Seonosaics, effective 
February 2, 1958 from $9,464 to $9,823 (ossta©). 

MAD6S&, Donald L. , Assistant Professor "A", Forestry, effective 
April 6, 1958 frosa $6,333 to $6,708 (3 steps above cd&isna). 

K&g5&B9, Donald K., Instructor M A M , Bsrticelture, effective 
June 8, 1958 from $5,304 to $5,772 (3 steps 'above Bde&saia). 

OUBH, David F., Jr.* Instructor "A", Feed-Fertiliser, effective 
March 30, 1953 from $5,538 to $5,772 (3 steps above einisusi). 



PrOfaotica 



SS&TH, J. Robert, Jr., free Associate Professor *W% Poultry 
Husbandry to Professor "A", Poultry" Husbandry, effective May 4, 
1958 at $8,736 (3 steps above isdntaEs) . 



BSRUBS, John L. , Instructor Caslf-tta) (Teaching Associate) la 
Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 1958 at $2,158 
per year. Sspeets to receive B.S, in E.E 9 degree in Jnne of 
yearo 

BLAISBSLL, Mrs. Asm Parsons, Instructor "A", Bacteriology (half* 
tissa) Office of Haval Besearch Contract leer- 1812 (00), effective 
March 9 to August 6, 1958 at $43.75 per neek She has so decree 
but has ec^leted 4 years out of the 5 requires* for a bachelor 9 s 

degree in Cursing from the University of Massachusetts. She hopes 
to complete her degree at Michigan State University this fall. 

809SSSZI, Frank 6. , Instructor Caalf-t&se) in Civil Engineering, 
effective Septes&e? 1, 19S8 bz .$2, IBS per year, I^eets to re« 

ceive B.S. 1b C.E. degree 2a June of this year. Wishes to take' 

graduate vs&ek leading to H.S. in C.E. 

COUBKGSESl, George &., Instructor (half *t tee)- . 2a Mechanical Engi- 
neering, effective SeptesJber 1, 1958 -at $2', 158 per year. Sheets 
to receive B.S. in M.E. degree in June of this year. Plans to 
take graduate *aor& leading to H.S. in H.E. 



>, Bonaid E. 9 Instructor (half -tjise) ia Civil Engineering, 
effective September 1 9 1955 at $2,15$ pes* year* Espects to re- 
ceive B.S. in CS. degree ia Jane of this yeas* 

fUS3SX. 9 welter Fo , Jr. , Instructor ia Electrical Engineering, 
effective September 1, 1953 at $4,316 per year. Espccts to re- 
ceive B.S. ia B.S. degree ia June of this ysar«> 

6IRXS&9 Harie-Cleudc, Instructor (one* third c&sa) ia Rosacea 
Languages, effective September 1, 1958 at $1 9 43$«66 per year, 
degrees received: Baeecleureat lere partie from La Chcuderaie, 
Baccalaureat 2° partie from Gears Libre, Teamen, Propadeutique 
ia Literature froa university of Lyon. Taught at Cartridge, 
England 1955-56; Teacher at MaeHorrary College 9 Jacksonville, 
Illinois academic year 1957-58. 

PHI T 2 3 Hoisard 3. 9 las tractor (half-time) ia Mechanical Engineer- 
ings effective Septer&er 1, 19S3 at f 2,158 par year. Expects to 
receive B.S. ia H.S. from Hbreester Polytechnic Institute ia 
Jane of this year. He plana to attend Graduate School at the 

University of Massachusetts this fall* 

ggtra Ces ageasatiea Ba ring Subbmp 

PH&, Ed&ard S., Instructor "A" 9 Agricultural Engineering for the 
period July 6 through Asgust 29 9 1958. Ea tail! receive $384 for 
this ecsassr employments *$aich will include teaching a shop course, 
assisting in research ami preparation of extension ssatorialsc 



Contiaaation of Leave of Absence l&theut^Pay 

F&&E3S, diaries Frederic 9 Jr. 9 Instructor iia Esmaace Languages, 
for the acadenic year 1953-59. 

Withhold Stan Increase 

PCSIgSS, Alfred K« 9 Instructor ia Agricultural Engineering* It is 
requested that the step-rate increase tf&tch scald have been 
effective September 1 9 1950 be withheld. 



Efs&ritus 



BkYSGR, Jasss W. 9 Associate Dean of Agriculture and Director of 
Extension Service 9 Veritas 9 effective June 30 9 1953. 

BOL&SHQgEB, Bobert P. 9 Professor of Forestry, Veritas 9 effective 
August 31 9 1958. 

SICB, J. Harry, Professor of Forestry, fis&rites, effective 
July 31 9 1958. 



8fcer»-R§*e XoexfiMMcs 



sfc&££ «£ t&e 1toiTO?&£&7 £sa fifisefNEdaRCA with tiscj sfeese s«ite<&sl© 
£$ eggood m*& paye&lo <&s?&$ tteo xamtho o£ ApffU. fi»«£ £%? 9 1958, 



SebbA^icftl Locus 



WXUntMB. T«U **»*»¥ t* 



1&£8»59) «m£ rtsfctote 1&&fi&8 2o JCB&8S&01I, £k®&lB%m& ftrotisa&osr 



, t& s»swt<&. t 



$«Q&Gge&tezk of £fc» eesgNrcft ©s& fc&® ®sel^§j ©f t&e Q»il£Su8ll 9 Vtosarafc 

$Bttfefi8g2.«. ®W8 fcf» Will &© Sf»@!SS& l,m £&» $Utl& 9 ^m XSfoW4®.&Sft 

&si s£ WBft&ffal fc? Ssgt&nd ©alleges «bm£ iraiwsssitiGSo BfE&ssioas 

Fell aeuecfie? 1958 ®Z full g»&y. 



&8ME EMHOTSWa QSBXBL WW WMmM 

Jiai M »" »i«5l » UWWiHl««ii»»B T i1l ■iiim WITH nun li nn ii»i in- irrir irr-irnr- i -nirrv-1 «m ~r~t,r.. 

Approval is reqpeaSeo' for Clt& es^lpjwasixt of the following £aeulsy for 
She $er£ot3Q <$ea£@aa£ea' foata?, "si&ia sepreaeass essra ccsspeasa&lea. 

$&I&0S 8 Joseph S* 9 /Uieeeia&e Professor og Civil Basimeeriag, £rasn 
JtMS© 30 so ito^ast 8» 195$, Fza£esse? Koreas -Bill aoalss t&sh a$~ 
ttlaiatsasive pl&msisg for Sbe'£dl', extd 1& she abseaca of S&o Beam,, 
tftll be in ei&asge off site Sdheol* Bis rase of eogpasssastei per «ee& 
aboald be $167.79 or $1, 006* 20 for She ®te mate. 

BH££&££S, Arthur R. , Aas&asasiS ?ro£ee$or. oi SsgiSaSi, £rca Augoat 4 
to Aajgaas &9 e 1953* 8r« ■ Willies will eoposvise'-tfao ftesX seotiosd^g 
&ss4 also tea seheoalftag ■ <s£ dl s&ades&a OS Ste BairosaiSy for fete 

' foil aessspter, 1958*59* la tt&H bo TOSpoiso&tea for seotioa bdeaaiag 
(aoeesM&n$ of COQS8& * ze0osvss£oa carsfa into Gaoaraas &M aecfcieaa)., 
pseparaslea of eearae ear$ paa&a osed as reafieza for the £ire£ day of 

dosses 9 as&a 1 seteialtsg °£ epec&d eaeea.. Sia r&te of eosipofisafeioa 
sbodd oe $161 a 8£ per «a!& or $647.40" £e? tbe fsssr t^g^a* 

S$M£A S Baotel osaS O'BSBg^, Joseph H., Associate- end Aseistaas Pro« 

laasara of HBC&aaied Is^ir>@sr&®p reapeeti'B'dyt gre® Juaa 23 to 
Atsgass 15» 1953. U&e #-&Br£as& Society of 3&©&as&?£sg Ickicasiois osd 
fctsa ASSBdLe Eaargy Cass^sslosa aga^spoasor&ags €» itotita&a for traits- 
log is aaseloar sctea&a osaS eat$&aea?ias at €oraall Uaiwralty fross 
. Jama 2$ So August 15, 1953 C& ssaelcs). fteoffedsore $©&da ana 1 O'Byrae 
tare received sppoiatsBSCtd to a&tead sSsa 8»^asok issti&a&e* The 
Atasde &ter@y Caaaiea&ea Mil pay §75$. @® 60 ©&£& issdivixSad if £fee 
SJaiversity irf.ll eoafislbQSo as o^aal easois&fc ? io oassh ^ersoa, Sho 
AfiflodLe Bsjorgy Cois^issiozs pa^SJ» ol©o 8 She Ss&osposSeSiGB ccstsj. Plfias 
oro hQ&eg easla so esp^EsI tba sodes? ei^lsjsarir© ©fferii^s as s&s 
Xfak&misy of tEosdae&sscsss as wall m iss roloso^S ^rsa®. Thi^ trfll 
bo possible Slaroegls slsa asseiaisaee of Profes^oro Sob«sla oad O'B^rsso 
is slaa issssitatd psogsrcBt. "Eteir: rete of ooap<ass3fiSio& per c&ek sliceld 
be 2%£ of osimssl odasy or .$754*65 for % iseek^ asi^ $756.75 for 5 
i«eok0 respectively for Professors Sebda aad ©'^rt^. 

S^SHS, Alias 0. XcsssecsSo? asd Gai^aoea' Caa&salo?, f saa July 7 to 

^3sss 29 9 1953. Mr. Saeha vAXi h® slso eoairdissa&asr of sfea su^iar 

SasSi^ -aad <es35ssoli^ pgog&tsgi for iacoslss^fisasStsiea ss fe&<s Batesr** 
aisy* Eo iffiili bo xaapassj&lo for scls^^uiis^ Sls@ apSiSaSa aad place* 

ibqqss Seass for all ss^^easa se^ asvaaga'£0r :, asid 'aapazviao s&e aooriss 
of sis© teats. His oSlor saapoaaibiliS'lea will ^0 so sc&e&sle sho 

ootmsoiisg and aSviais@ taSarvlaisa tor eiSaSaaSa ''f&ile thay are oa 
asi^'as ^s.4 arrai^a for disaassi3i3S£aQ of t^Bt acsoreo asd ofeliar reco^^s 
ob she esa^easa So the faoalfy afviacrs'for p&asalas s^o 8Sa^aat 9 a 
progr^ of stu«ly» Mis r^a o^ cok^ossssSob giisaM ba $113 • 10 per isaalt 
or $t@4*S0 for the ©iglsS irae&s* 



TO: jtetara of fcha Beard of Truataaa ©I s tha IBaivaffaity of Massaafeuaasta 

. O&s Fraa£«ian& 8at»asr 

SOBJE€Ts SaaoBSK^dafcloa four fcamiiMttton of gonadal aactaaaioa agreaa&ats vitli 
fc&a Slaiwaraity Sstaaaioa Dlvlaioa of the ItopaYtnaiit: of Bduaaeioa — 
Cflomoiiweatth of MoMBaclnsaa&fca . 

This ©ss^r&ssdMa i® «sr£tcan ft© ari&£ly ©tat® &$&in the jsoaifcioa of the 
e^lalafcsrafcioss sraiafclva £© fonsar agvAOMmfifl aa&gautad in 19S0 aad 1951 by 
£ras£«aa& ?aa Sfasar vi&h c&a Divlcloa of Cnivavaity Sasteaaias valatlv* to fc&a 
eecnradi&tt&cn of o£f*c8aqpu0 eouraaa at Veatovmr F£ald and Ftfc&afiald* 

3%£a mtfctoir aaa bs*£afly dlseatfaad at fcfoa Jaaaasry asaauiag of she Board 
of Stuat<M8 sad, at tha vaetnBKMStttioa of £*sa Cfealsfsato of tha Soard, taibled 
at tbat ttaa. 

Slaaa fcaa erlglaal agvcaaatit $s&® ratified by tfea Board of lYsacrt©©©* it is 
ny reeaBSMMidottoa chat affieattva *ltana SOfcSa* 1958, ta£& agraaroat a&d all ®£ it® 
iaplicfttlcno &lkair®&£t$r ^ai&tive fco tha flaivasrsity of KtasaaeluiMtta t?® caaaallad* 
This raaajfiaaoaatloa as»a a® $ racalt of vary saraful sfcudy b^ &ss Ad Hoe C&G&* 
Ga££fc©@ of fclha jfocalty itiiiaa 1 appelated last fall to isw£@© tfeie altufttian, a&d 
t-aair Kaeaanradatloii fair tamtinatiaa of shs agffaaaant ^«aa baaed ©a aha fello&l&g 

In fk® educational b$itil%$g&&ni% &scl oativatton of atoaaafta aa^ollad la thaaa off* 
qsasgag ao*sr$aa ara sot aaayfaaabla to fc&osa of taa stttdsata casrafally acfatlttad 
aad dltaatad iaso tfca 'pr©gr.t®is at tte Qaivsaraity. 

2. Tea Saivasraity cloas not hagae altbatt "th© a«atfeorlfey os? tbe adntslstratlva 
eaatirol aaa&sssty to approw; oou£8a$ &ad eoas&a eosataat £ss tha iatairast of ssa£a*» 

tainiog higli. standard® ia aaeh off^casajma g^ogMiW,, 

3 9 Th® Qalvaraity d©&@ aot hova final autt&ority la &lm aalaettoa aad a^rovftl 

of isatvaecara ^iso ruo off fete eauraaa for tdstoa ^® ara aupgsoaad to gi^'<8 

4.. Libras'y 'faailtlttoo fosr the eirarns^ aira teadaq^atej, sad' tba aaiauat of iraadlag; 

doas he® nis^'©^ bes^s of a liigli aftaadasrd* ■ 



5 



iStagulasr «Iass ftfttaadenaa 1© ao£ sra^aitad of fell© aftudeata &iti& in waay ivm&mm® 

thseE^s© c£ fanty ajsa£^®5taaSs Ss ln&o8&£ble« 

S, IV »f ^sj' &£ tfee tfaivevalty SsCaaslea DiH?£s£oa asr® a©S ®a fete «ss» 

'al a® &fe©s© of tha Uaiverelty of tfiutifiiafiaatiattaa aiaa this Is a deta^lavatlas 

.: la torn;® of tba &stmr« of tha w*t!j. .as vail as zh® tmrnmuty a:®aog$i£Ss;£oa 
of taa psrafaastoaal ®Z&&nw<un of y^ixraraity of Mnasaebuaatts iKSJSrustSK'© es^sg^sS 

1 ®.ot @^ly e©22sas* vlth felta raeos :;£lfflas atust raa ste^l^ vltlidffav 

.s ass^? aaaradltffi&lan c«£ .aaaraea £a tba vsl^^rsisy Estaasiaa 0£^£®£oa ©se©p;S; as 
thay mc® evaluaftad by oor s^dssie^^ €?ff£sc 3 bwt I ®©^ld fartaatf cmimmZ fesst 



W% tSessboaro ©£ the ®oar<3 ©f Itewstoeo of th® Ohlvtsralty of Kaasaahuostts 

Ps:ig8ideRt Kttther 

STOJ1C?: BEeeinBtaiidatie&i f«r tonslaatitan of gtsaasssral esfc&affi&oes af^o&soato with 
S'isa Ctaivoralty TtosaKtai Mvisisft of ste StagNnrtaaot of Education •- 
Cmnosnmttith of BtoSTOhusotts (continued) 

isntil kIm University r®c®iv®« ftuniSa upon its «a roeasnsadikt&oii to torcJLop esstonnion 
$K»r!c in gsnssal fields oth<&£ stea agriculture 9 ®a stolid stay out: of this ptollfsra* 
fcion tissd dilution of activity as && operation (tetrtackaftflil to our hest iatortsts sa»s§ 

not in th© best «arv£c-M of tho CouBBenaeftlth in tesrsw of high quality University 

nducntion. 

(I sis cnuro &loo ia aK&ixtg this rsccoKtaudstlon that the titLo TInlvsrslty Ssstsasion 

uso« by ths DspArtas&t of Question to cower this kind of wr& is a asisl@fi«&ing one 
if not -a- misaaas-r sine* it constantly g©n«8s to nssoci&to th® Onivarsity of 
l&!i®ffnchu&!gt2:s indirectly -with scxbsthiag over which ■sua hasm sa@ control* or diroctionj, 
and, aftor sho esopletion of this p&li.cy 9 n® ccuMMttiiott*) 



■»•»**"* 



Jy^"' X ' *<*"% 



/ President 



V 



April 9th » 195® 






siee of sfee asteBtog- Sms&sasm class wUX casafcisue to tocscass in 
nus&aj: Sroa yea? to year* Those cksogoa tail! goraseafc phobic*© &&&& eegasd to 
tt&e fcflaisaaiesttoa o£ basic s£t*fe& pozsocs&l aasvtaes* Ifzosa&d eg plcctafg to^ 
easing aaafees® a$ ife&ase SsrcctaSB classes i&fco aa assay o£ pnseSt ea&HEs asal ex«$« 
less Itoea* tlseze £© a seed for & psogsaa ©£ mutest sssvicia iMel* oil! be 
gjosrsosal as trail as a££!ie&Q3s& ovaa ttith eBsoUffl8E& iacaeases*'- Xbla ^zo^oaal 
fog- a S8EK88£ GaaaaalSs^j goldsaca sssd tcsttog pTogzim j&s £m$msr* attidaitts is 
a step is* su{£> & sErest: to. The ps^iras amabloo a gmslsmsi* esfces he feas baou 
aceoiJ&S'S fosr 8*£&£&&£a® to else !JtaiVGHEsiiey s to calces en© o5 ssmy colic&slad 
dates to patitief$a£o to a tse ar&I a fealf -lay pesftad-of eoassa&isg academic 
gt»£da&ca as& test tog dus&mg tfea m$mm&* S&osa usable so te&o pceet to assy c£ fcfco 
pssgsa&s dcgd&g fc&e ssssssr oil! ba ad'ia^lsd fbs fcasfcisu fsnediaealy greiosr to 
Sras&a&e orior&atioa k&s& to Sa^tasfeor. 

A. Aftsspeses cf <&s £sogrsa 






To e&fiklo Ssscosh&g^ gsasbasaa stuSsssts 20 discuss &nf* plan 
£&ato part-tolas- aasdORftB psagraE© tiith as&oss c£ dka 
£acalty as$ otker C&vos&toy vepiraaeatatis&a baSase ahay 

begfe taato 2%z&Z yeas gga&ssata e£ study* 

2* "2a gasfsit the eatabitobaana sasi davelapaaaa ©£ a jsl&coMst: 
gaa&tog grogga© ahieb &&XS ea&la all at&^gass ??!xo feava 
Gatstaagtos skills to a sa&Jaes ssa&tair ares sa.£tla&, to 
aas£82eass ts££fe a& a^vtocsr^eecasaXcw, tba a&aaeefl courses 
03? alternates ogaa to t&dn. 

tit&'36&GOl yeas* 

4# ^o estisblisl'i closer s^lc^ior^lsips bJatseaa £&s liiTivai'sity 
■ami £bs |>a'i*sM:s o£ our fesffmiiig students. !&st:2^g0 oraS 

08ats8ttoB8 9 t-7111 aist iaiujb. : -0ft8^p to a clsasedsf appedeiatftoB 

antVcn^erstandi^ of, due goals and jobless of tho ofeliar. 






Juoli a ©rogiras canr^t bs dose et* ££clontly or leitSi so itatcI^ tbosoo^siess 

£?j two or £wo aM a lislf &ay& to Sa^t^G^eu iBhan tbd iasira €£®3&i^a class 
assrlvas oi2 &&m%xs for Hbe fall dsse'afear. 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 
SELECTION PROCESS - 1938 

Number applications 811 

Number scholarships available 25 

Following is a summary ©f family background of the 25 
candidates being recommended: 

Ao Parental status 

Living with both parents IS 

Living with on® parent (death* divorce, separation) 7 

B* Average number of dependent children per family 3 

Co Average family income (1957) - $3744 

Do Car ownership 

8 farad lies » n© car 
11 families own cars ■=> average age is 1951 tsnodel 

All 25 have made outstanding scholastic records in high school « 



CLASS OF 1962 « WOMEN » RECOMMENDED FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



NAME 



flpU Gilmore, Mary Ee 
2* Aliferis, Evelyn 
3 Rugg, Cynthia Lo 



4o Girard, Irene M< 



5c Horn, Jean L» 

6c Katseff , Marsha N« 

7o Jacavanco, Maryann J 



8, Baranowski, Donna M« 



9« Buckley, Emilia V a 



10, 



Kobrenski, Theodora M c 



HOME TOWN 
Walt ham 

Lynn 
Arlington 

Wlnchendon 
Cambridge 

West Newton 
Salem 

Lowell 
Lowell 

Lawrence 



COUNTY 

Middlesex 

Essex 

Middlesex 

Worcester 

Middlesex 

Middlesex 

Essex 

Middlesex 

Middlesex 

Essex 



MAJOR 

English 

Government 

English 

Physiology 

Biology 

English 

Science 

Language 

English 

Undecided 



ALTERNATES 



,'J.o Dubchansky, Judith Lo 

|2 Lamb, Gillian 

13« Rintala, Marie L 

14« Tyminski, Irene Jo 

IS* Glass, Sandra Do 

16 a Gonyea, Margaret J e 

17 • Goldberg, Helen B« 

18 © Silcox, Carolyn M* 

19 • Levesque, Anne<>Marie 

20* Gross, Toby R« 

21 9 Wax, Ellen T« 

22 « Hastings, Nancy L« 

23 « Bears© , Deborah A 6 
Havey, Anne Mo 



Revere 



Swansea 



Chi cop ee 

Beverly 

Springfield 

Brook line 

Lowell 

North Adams 

Newton 

Revere 

Gloucester 

Centerville 

Newton Highlands 



Suffolk 
Bristol 
Worcester 

Hampden 
Essex 
Hampden 
Norfolk 

Middlesex 
Berkshire 

Middlesex 
Suffolk 

Essex 

Bants table 
Middlesex 



Chemistry 

English 

Mathematics 

Undecided 

Mathematics or Language 

Undecided 

Science 

Education or Chemistry 

Undecided 

Home Economics 

Mathematics 

Nursing 

Undecided 

Undecided 



CLASS OF 1962 o MEN - RECOMMENDED FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



AME 




Abbott,, William H, 



2 DiDomenico, Nun2io Jo 

3* Hall, William R e 

4» Turcotte, Richard 

5 Schelter, Jr , Henry R 

6«, Prout, Richard L 

7o D'Amato, Richard J e 

8 e West lurid, Kenneth P 

9o Baron, Stanley J 

10 o Young, Ronald Do 

lie Waterman, Jr«, Asa 

.12 o Ross, Charles So 

b* Kabler, Sumner 

14o Nichols, Ralph Ve 

15o Pelletier, Donald Ho 



HOME TOWN 
Attleboro 

Mil ford 
Tcewnsend 
Lawrence 
Westport 

Dorchester 
Agaraam 
Gloucester 
Mattapan 
Watertown 
Rel .©both 
Med ford 
Dorchester 
West Duxbury 
North Adams 



COUNTY 

Bristol 

Worcester 

Middlesex 

Essex 

Bristol 

Suffolk 

Hampden 

Essex 

Suffolk 

Middlesex 

Bristol 

Middlesex 

Suffolk 

Plymouth 

Berkshire 



MAJOR 

M«M— IIWWIUII 

Engineering 

Engineering 

Undecided 

Journalism 

Engineering 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Engineering 
French 
Education 
Physics 
Engineering 
Engineering 
Eieco Engineering 
Mathematics 



ALTERNATES 



16 o Farnum, Bruce Eg 

17 » Gum, Paul H 6 

18 o Crossman, Lloyd Do 

19o Cariin, III, William F< 

20o Quirk, James D© 



21o Rosenfield* Elliot I» 



22 o Murray, Richard A< 



Athol 

Attleboro 

Merrlmac 
Springfield 
Pittsfield 
New Bedford 
Dedham 



Worcester 
Bristol 

Essex 
Hampden 

Berkshire 

Bristol 
Norfolk 



Undecided 

Arts and Science 
History 
Engineering 
Undecided 

Liberal Arts 

Engineering 



Page • 2, 



CLASS OF 1962 - MEN - RECOMMENDED FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 




3« Butler , Jactes B 



24. White, Harry C. 

25 o Connors, John To 

26* Salisbury, William J, 

27 o Kaufman, Burton to 

28* O'Reilly, Joseph P d 

29« Dietch, Stephen L© 

30 o Rowel 1, Richard Me 

31 o Lipchitg, Joseph W. 

32 e Putnam, C» Richard 

33o Little, Roger G* 



u wawnai iMiimmaiiw 



HOME TOWN 



Oxford 



East Northfieid 



Chicopee 
Weymouth 



|4o Zigelis, Andrew P. 
i5. Field, Frederick Po 



Revere 

West Roxbury 

Lowell 

Oxford 

Adams 

North Andover 

West Barnstable 



COUNTY 

Worcester 

Franklin 

Hampden 
Norfolk 

Suffolk 
Middlesex 
Suffolk 
Suffolk 

Middlesex 
Worcester 

Berkshire 
Essex 

Barnstable 



MAJOR 

Engineering 

Eleco Engineering 

Physics 

Engineering 

Biology 

Physics 

Engineering 

Psychology 

Undecided 

Engineering 

Engineering 

Chemistry 
Medicine 



SUGGESTED ALTERNATES FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



i 



NAME 



lo Clough, Stuart B 
2 Baggarly, Bruce D< 



lo Scaccia, Joseph F 
2 Hare, Robert Co 



lo Croteau, Donald A 
2o Hewitt, John J 



1 



MEN 






CLASS OF 1959 






HOME TOWN 


COUNTY 


MAJOR 


Vineyard Haven 


Dukes 


Chemical Engineering 


New Bedford 


Bristol 


History 


CLASS OF 1960 






Be 11 Ingham 


Norfolk 


PreoMedical 


Whitinsville 


Worcester 


Elec* Engineering 


CLASS OF 1961 






Springfield 


Hampden 


Engineering 


Dedhatn 


Norfolk 


Engineering 



WOMEN 



CLASS OF 1959 



la Crawford. Ann L< 



2<> Saltman, Myrna A< 



North Andover 



Revere 



Essex 



Suffolk 



Botany 
Education 



CLASS OF 1960 



1* Russo, Yolanda 

2o Krauss, Elizabeth Ac 



Deerfield 



Hopedale 



Franklin 



Worcester 



History 

French 







CLASS OF 


1961 






lo 


Boyce, Elaine Jo 


Springfield 




Hampden 


Mathematics 


2, 


Hebert, Joan Lo 


New Bedford 




Bristol 


Chemistry 


3o 


Peltier, Agnes Eo 


Holyoke 




Hampden 


Science 



I 



i 



2009 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 31, 1958, 10:30 a.m., Student Union Building, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Bart let t presiding 



P RESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, Miss 
Buxton, Crowley, Haigis, McNamara, 
Miss S chuck, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty, 



it was 



VOTED : To award the following degrees to the 
candidates listed on the attached 
Commencement program for June 1958: 

College of Arts and Sciences 
220 Bachelor of Arts 
103 Bachelor of Science 

College of Agr icul ture 

50 Bachelor of Science 

Scho ol of Business Administration 

107 Bachelor of Business Administration 

School of Engineering 

18 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
17 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
44 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
47 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

School of Home Econom ics 

30 Bachelor of Science 

School of Nursing 

4 Bachelor of Science 

Division of Physical Education 
16 Bachelor of Science 

Total - 656 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of 

the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to the 
candidates as listed on the attached 
Commencement program for June 1958: 



Degrees 



2010 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



Old Chapel 

Religious 
Center 



Director of 
Cooperative 
Extension 
Service 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
8 Master of Arts 

2 Master of Arts in Teaching 
36 Master of Science 

4 Master of Business Administration 

1 Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

1 Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

6 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 61 

Grand Total - 717 

There was discussion of the University's participation 

in the celebration of the town of Amherst's Bicentennial on 

October 17, 1959, and it was 

VOTED : To confer the honorary degree LL.D. on 

Senator Stuart Symington and the honorary 
degree LL.D. on Admiral Jerauld Wright on 
October 17, 1959 with the usual proviso 
that the recipients be present in person 
to receive the awards. Both men were born 
in Amherst. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the attached series of personnel 
actions. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the administration to assign 

Old Chapel as a religious center as soon as 
the building may be reserved for this purpose 
and to proceed with planning and fund raising 
from private sources to complete necessary 
renovations. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To appoint the Dean of Agriculture and Director 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station as Director of the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service of the University of Massachusetts 
effective July 1, 1958 and to delegate to him 
authority for the management of all activities 
connected with the Cooperative Extension program. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To change the title Associate Dean, College 
of Agriculture and Director of Extension 
Service to Associate Director, Massachusetts 
Cooperative Extension Service and Associate 
Dean, College of Agriculture. 

Mr. Johnson said that Mr. Brehm, Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds, is retiring this summer and that it will be 

difficult to refill the position unless it can he treated as a 

professional position under the provisions of Chapter 556 of the 

Acts of 1956. It was 

VOTED : To declare the position of Superintendent 

of Buildings and Grounds to be a professional 
position in accordance with Chapter 556 of 
the Acts of 1956. 

The Trustees reviewed with the President the proposed 

increases in faculty salaries to be requested in the supplementary 

budget for the current year. The President emphasized that it is 

his responsibility to point out the imperative need for faculty 

salary increases if the University is to continue to hold a quality 

faculty and to recruit replacements. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to request 
in the supplementary budget increases in 
the salary of professional employees of the 
University in accordance with the attached 
schedule. 

There was discussion of the present status of the budget 

and the prospects for an increase in the appropriation over last 

year in order to take a larger student body in the fall of 195S 

and, it was 

VOTE D: To adopt the attached statement of policy. 



2011 



Associate 
Director, 
Mass. Coop. 
Ext. Serv. 



Super in tendent 
of Buildings 
and Grounds 



Salaries 



Policy on 
Enrollment 



2012 



TRUSTEE 



Goodell 
Library 



Donald B. 
White 



Rental 
Rates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



. It was also 

VOTED : To maintain as of highest continuing budget 
priority, now and for the future, the con- 
tinued need for an adequate and expanded 
library, recognizing books as the heart of 
the educational program and the only basic 
means by which students can independently 
or by assignment progress, assimilate, and 
advance in any course of study or research. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED r To adopt the attached citation of apprecia- 
tion of the services of Colonel Donald B. 

White. 

The Trustees discussed the rental rates for apartments 

in the County Circle dormitories and, it was 

VOTED : That the rates adopted in the April 21 

meeting shall be applicable to new tenants 
but that the rates in effect prior to that 
vote shall continue for the present tenants. 

It was agreed to call the annual budget meeting of the 

Board on Tuesday, July 1, at 12:30 p.m. in the Hotel Statler in 



Boston. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 





^■^y^&^^S Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



Appointments Ab ove Mini 



EDDY, S. Shillp, Aeai&taat Prota&or of Education^ affective 
September I, 195$ at $5,304 per year (1 step above miniasua). 
A,B a Nebraska Stat® Teachers College; M.A. Coltrambia University 
Teachers College; ©aspects Fh.B. in 1950. Instructional 
4aaiatont, Coiwabla University 1952-53; U,S P Amy Quarteraaster 
torpa Teacher of Methods of Instruction 1953-35; Graduate 
Assistant in History of Education, Columbia University Teachers 
College 1956-53. 



WQt£m 9 Hilliasa Dee@Ias, Assistant Professor of Physics, effective 

Sept©saoer I, 1958 at $©,0©e per year (4 steps above sdnimie). A.B. f 
M.So 9 FhoDo University of TesnMSsaee., Fuibrigfot student at Innsbruck, 

&aatria 1951-53; tw© years of experience as a research assistant in 

laboratory work at the University of Tennessee; and three years of 
<ss^er!en®e as an instructor in introductory physics courses at the 
callage level, also at the University of Tenseaaee. 

JOKESOft, Philip, Instructor in Fnyaies, effective S@pt®^ar 1, 1958 
at $5,5&4 per year Caoasiaunj) . B.S. University of Massachusetts „ 
Esa has had sore than ten ym%& of «parieaca in teaching physics 
and related courses at the college levels Assistant Professor of 
Physics, University of IS&saaelmsetts 1944; simee 1946 he has been 
teaching Fhysie® at Uaatwsrth Institute in Boston* 

mmmkY, gillie®®,, Assistant Professor of Education, effective 

Septei&er 1, 1958 at $5,538 per year (2 steps above sainisssss}. B.A. , 
M.I. University of Hsrth Carolina, ejects Bd.D. in Assgust 1958 

Teacher pub lie schools, ©oldsboro, I&rth Carolina 194&-49; teacher 
public schools, Gastonia, Korth Carolina 1949-51; teacher of History, 
Mr Force School, San Antonio 9 Texas 1951-55; teacher public schools, 
gastonia, Borth Carolina 1955-S&:; Instructor of Introduction to 
Mucation, University of itorth Carolina 1957 to date, 

Msl«3elims-lfl^VAUJ&, Antonio, Instmetor in English, effective 

Septesjker 1, 195B at $4,525 per year (1 step above ninlna). M.Ao 
Storfetaestem University, las? degree froas University of Athens, ex- 
pects Ph. Do in June 195$, Civil and penal attorney in Athens 1948- 
52; ssrote scripts for tfseklv- broadcast called "Intellectual Life 
Abtocd"1952*54; granted Sdsaffer fcellouship for atttdios at Berth- 
item University 1954 to ^at®<, 



CMIBY S Sbtitaas &. , Instructor is Electrical Essgineericu, effective 
&ep£esal*er 1, 1958 at #4,524 per year (1 step above w&v&mm)* He 
will receive B.S.E.E. from University of Colorado in June 1958. 
Uc S. Ksvy 1949-53; for past three years has been employed as part- 
ti®® engineering assistant by C„ J. Applegat© Ce&^aay of Bould®r, 
Goler&da ^hile consisting %mtfk on engineering degree , 

saOCTCEl, Jesses Slupeon, Aaaiataat Professor of Chemistry, effective 
Sept«9&er 1, 19SS at $&,®0& per year (4 steps above atnimaB) • A B. 

Beaten University; IIS. l&m State College; Ph. 9. University of 
Bom, Italy. Me ^as in Italy e® a Fulbr%ht grant • Instructor in 
Ounaiaery Franklin and mrahall College 1949-51; alloyed in intotry 
by 8eF©nt Company from 1951 t® present. 



A&potetsseats Above Minimm (contiisaed) 

RICE&R3S028, Jess® 0, , Instructor Ita Physics, effective 
Septeo&er 1, 1950 at $5,564 *ser year (i^jjisiam) • B.S. itesericen 
International College; M.S. University of Massachusetts. Horlced 
la industry 1936-38; Springfield Fehiic School system 1933-44; 
returned to industry 1944-46; Sprit^field Public School system 
1946-50; currently acting head of Department of Physics at 
African International Col lego. 

SGSSSSSSa Kfinnath D. , assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
effective Septes$*er 1, 1958 at $5,772 per year (3 ©tops above 
ssiatasa). S.B. in Physical Kst allergy, 2-LX.T a ; S2.B. In Metallurgy, 
Yale, fforfced at Severe Copper and Brass Cosspany 1939-41; Chase 
Brass & Copper Company 1941-44; research and process &atallur£lst, 
Bri^eport Brass Coa^any aad graduate student at Yale 1945-47; 
division metallurgist, tasricaa Steel and Mire Company Electric . 
Cable $?©r&s„ Bareester 1947-51; Stoterfoery Farsrel Foundry & fclachine 
Coi^aay 1951*55; J. M. Hey Ccspany, BleeMield 1955-57; research 
end davelopsBaat engineer, Hartford Steal Ball Company 1957 to 
date. Ho has served as instructor of E$stalta*$y at Bridgeport 
Engineering Institute, University of Connecticut extension division 
and HUlyer College. 

TAB&CHHIK, Willies &• , Assistant Professor of Msehanieel Engineer is^ 8 
effective Septestxer 1, 195© at $6,®06 per year (4 steps ^b&^& saiaimm) . 
B.tLE. , M.H.S. Htt» York diversity; Ph.D. in H.8. Yale* Teaching 
Assistant, Yale, 1950-52; Ethyl Corporation Research Laboratory June 
to September 1951; Ethyl Corporation lesearch Fell©*? at Yale, 
Scptos&er 1951 to Hovesber 1952; Fairchild Engine and Mrplane 
Corporation ©f EJearpoEfc, Lecg Xaiaad, lovessber 1952 to January 1955; 
Babeoek & tfilcois Ces^any of Keif York 1955 to date. His experience 
has been largely in the field of thersedynaMcs and heat transfer. 

tASUffiSRS, Siosfie, Asaisteat Professor of Sociology, effective 

$ept«rf>er 1, 1953 at $5,772 fsar year (3 steps above Qiairaa)* B.S. 
Istatgars University; M.S.- 19m York University; 5h.©» tow Yozfe Uni- 
versity. 'Lecturer, Cols^a of &he City of Ifes? York and Columbia 
University 1952 to date, 

2&JXCSS&, ©liver T. , Instructor in Chemistry, effective Septea&sr 1, 
195$ at $5,146 per year C& ©taps above sainisBssi). B.S. Baldwin- 
Hallace Colleges M.S. tSaysee State University; is now tiorkiog toward 

£a»9* degree at Hayno University. Instructor of C&emistry at 
Uaiea College 1953»34; Teaehiss Assistant 1954 to present. P©rhed 

-S3. 



I 



in isdestry a^^u-j^. 

&SXTLIB, Harry, Assistant Professor of Education, effective 
Jgeptsisfeer 1, 1958 at' $5,772 ^ar year <3 ote^s above sainiuassa). 
B.S.S. City College of B&w fork; 1LA. in Education, Teacher® College; 
ejects Ph.D. In 19S8. Teacher San Lorenzo, California 1950-51; 
Teacher Ksw Yorlc City (hi^h school level) 1951-54; Teaching Assistant, 
Soclal«j?hilosophical Foiasda-tioa of Education, Teachers College, 
Kew York 1955-36; ?eae!»&r of Social Stadias, Senior Mgh School, 
Ka^ York City 1955-53. 






I 



SBAIGA, Hiilip A. , Instructor (1/3 ttae) Ofeachiog Associate) in 
Shysics, effective September 1, 1955 et $1,438.67 per year. He 
*?ill receive the B.A. £ ross ia&arican International College 1b Juce 

19SS 9 end has been emitted as a graduate student at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

S&XSSSXa Jacqueline E. C, Instructor (1/3 tise) (Teaching 

Associate) in Eossanca Leatgtta&es , effective Sepfccs&er 1, 1958 at 
$1 3 433. 66 pes year. She holds her "Baecolaareat" from the lostitot 
Ketre Daiss, Annonay, Franca and fear "Licence D'Aqglals" (A.M.) 
from University of Greno&le. She has dona further graduate isork 

at University of hytm in preparation for a career as an English 

teacher ead has also studied at University of London. 

€&EXS, Soger, Assistsat Professor "A", Agricultural Coissfinications , 
effective May IS, 1938 at §3 S 8&$ per year. L&-S Row Jersey School 
of Lau. Free lance feature story writer* 1920-58 for Collier's, 
American Hsgassine, €os32opolitan end Liberty, Ho&er of staff, 
Evening tass, Hsusrfc, K.J. 1929-34; Mesher of staff, Besrabliean 
American, Water bury, Coma. 1935*40; -'Chief Publications Editor, ©Iff ice 
of liar Xnfomatlon 1941-45; Staff ssg^>or s Ne& York Tlaaas Msgasio© 
1943; Editor of tsagasise and publisher "Pion@er"1949«50. 

ISeGXLL, George E„ , Assistant Professor of Geology, effective 
September 1, 1958 at $5,070 par year. B.A. Carletoa College; 
M.S. Minnesota; expects Ph.D. from Princeton 1958. He has held 
teaching positions and assistantships at Minnesota and Princeton 
wtth a praiseworthy record at both places, f&sriag past year held 
National Science Foundation fellowship at Princeton. 

ISKEBjS, Theodore J. 8 Instructor (1/3 tioo - Te&ahing Associate) in 
Physics, effective Septes&er 1, 1958 at $1,438.67 per year. He will 
receive B.A. fresa African International College in June 1958, and 

has been adiaitted as a graduate student at the University of 
Massachusetts 

HSKXTIUK, Donald P. , Instructor (hslf-tte) in Chesaical Engineer- 
ing, effective September 1, 195$ at $2,158 per jq&s. B.S. in C.E. 

University of Massachusetts. Has been a teaching fellow in Chcssieal 
Efuincaring Departaent at the University ©f K&ssaehusctts since 
Sep tester I, 1957. 



, Gregory tf. , Assistant Professor (Visiting Lecturer) in 
Geology, effective Sepieciaer 1, 1958 for one semester at $90! 
B.S. , 23. S. and Ph.B. Colt&&ia University. He is presently a 

teacher at Asiherst College. 

Ee ingtaj s eaag it_atal jfsr 1 1 ., S t @p_, Incgeasc 



J, Pasal A., Instructor in History, effective Sept®si>er 1, 
1953 frossi $4 a 94® to $5,356 (2 extra steps.) 



Short Tens AppointEsant 

BQICCUEX, Mrs. Buth C. , Instructor in Homo Economics, for the 
ported April 3-11, 1953 at §83.00 per week; also for 2 days 
(Hay 6 and 7). This io Co aosuffie full charge of classes for 
Hies Borothy Dmris «Ak> rass absent because of serious illness 

in faaally. 

Aaresscnfc with Asaherst Collc ae 

It «no voted to authorise the President to sign an agrcessent tilth 
Assfecrst College for the half «tissa services of Richard A. Gregg as 
Visiting Instructor for the academic year 1958-»59 at the rate of 

eaa*half the cei^ensatioa paid Mr. Gregg by As$s©rst College, 



Bsieritus 

WMHMMHMMHV 

8AOTI2&EY, tfillis@ C. , Professor of Foul try husbandry, Esaaritus, 
effective August 31 , £958. 

Sastra Co mpensati on Par ins SumsBar {this is a correction) 

fJX&A, Sdtirard S. , Ins tractor "A", Agricultural Engineer ins £°? 
the period July 6 through August 29, 1953. He will receive $8©8 

instead of $084 as previously approved, for this aszsmar employment 
^hieh will include teaching a shop course, assisting in research 
and preparation of extension ©star ials. 




', William II. , Instructor and Assistant to the Dean of 
Man, fro® June 23 to August 16, 1953. He uiil he in charge of 
dormitory living for ®al© f restates at the University during the 
susasr testing and counseling prograa. He will he responsible 
for coordinating the program of counseling in the dormitory and 
will arrange for and supervise recreational activities for the 
freshmen ^hile they are on em&vt®. His other responsibilities 
will be to assist the Dean of SSsn &ith activities coming under 
that office. His rate of compensation should be $33.00 per &eek 
or $664.00 for the ei$h£ weeks. 



DXMIBEJ0, Eoaeiaarie, Instructor "A", in Dairy & Anissal Science 
(one-half tte) froa June 1 through August 29, 1958 at $5,070 
per year. B.S. Hunter Collage; M.S. Mt. Eslyoka College. She 
is presently s-jorking tctsord her Ph.D degree in Ecology at the 
University of Massachusetts and has been employed by the Zoology 



SANA, Martin J« of the Van Korsaan Machine Cos^any, Springfield, 
Massachusetts to assist in teaching Mechanical Engineering 28, 
Machine Shop Course from June 2 to June 20, 1958 « The Van Komaa 
Machine Cospany has agreed to make Mr, Se«a available for the 
above period of tism at the beginning rate of Instructor. His 
tseekly salary ©ill be $107.90 or $323.70 for three &@eks. This is 



to he paid to the ccas^any assd they in turn will coz&iaue Mr. Sawa 
en their payroll for ©ecial security purposes assd reteibarse his» 
for extra travel • Mr. Sara* taught at She University lost stussser 
under a similar arraaseaasnt. 



Esiteasion of Tcs^ioraryPoaltiono 

To approve e&tonsian o£ tespoic&gy professional gjositions for the 

fiscal year beginning Jsiiy 1, 1958. 



S tep-Rate Increases 

ta. I— MM fi7>iWJMBimiM* iiHi.l Ulli a#McKU t*vw nc wi i w ■■■»■ » ff»Wt w 

To approve step- rate increases for issuers ©£ the professional 
staff of the University in accordance t?ith the state schedule as 
earned and payable «tai&g the xaontfas of June and July, 1956. 



I 



XVS&Sm 07 MaSSaCHQSEHS 



s®§sm school eispuos ram 

(School of Engineering Faculty) 



thi® shs®& should be substituted for the listing of 

submitted to the Board &£ Trustees. 

June 2 - 20, 1958 













Weekly 










% of 


Annuel 


Eat© to 


Gross 


Rase 


Title 




Tin© 


Sate 


h® paid 


Earnings 


Cashin 9 S&f&seth D. 


Assoc; c Prof. 




100 


$6981 


$174. 53 


$ 523.56 


Eersld* Charles A. 


Asst* Prof. 




100 


5538 


138.45 


415.35 


Laes tadius » John 1. 


&s®£. Pa?©!. 




100 


5772 


144.30 


432.90 


Ifykytluk, Bo&ald P. 


Instructor 




100 


4316 


107 . 90 


323.70 


Fatterson Sober t &. 


Asstc Prof. 




100 


6240 


156.00 


468.00 


Swansea 3 John S*. 


Professor 




100 


8634 


217 o 10 


651.30 




June 2 


• July 


11. 1958 


5538 


138.45 




Costa, Arsaand J. 


Assfc. Prof. 




100 


330.70 


Pouers 9 Alfred 2, 


Instructor 




100 


5148 


129.70 


778.20 


I 


June 23 


- July 


11* 1958 









Bot?engi 9 Frank G. 
S^©asoa 9 John D« 



, Professor 100 8372 

July 14 - August lgi958 



Professor 



100 4313 
100 8684 



July 2 8 • September 

IBBIii^B ■ ■■■'HWIflilW IIMirwntTinJhlKOWmi— CfB!B»«m 



5. 1958 



209.30 



Assto Fr©f, 



138.45 



627.90 



107 . 90 323.70 

651.30 



830.70 



Powers » Alfred X* 






Cashing, Kenneth D» 
Goodehild, Iwwin L. , Jr. 



I 



Lsestedius. John E. 



Instructor 

Head of Bspt« 



5148 

9707 < 



Aneciet 11 

dMHMHnBSaBtacMawMWHKMiesva 



29, 1958 



Pr©£ e 



e g ?-, ?=& 



6981 
4524 



5772 



129.70 778.20 
242.69 1456.14 



174.53 

113. 10 



144.30 



523. 5§ 

33&.30 



432.90 



I 



I 



MacConnoll, iSillioa 



*Cennor, Patrieie 



Noilly 8 Harg&ret G. 

^Shessghisessy, Mary 



Cook, Mrs. Gladys 



Cook, Mrs. Qledy® 
*Sreu&er, Frances 

*Sakosh, Hargiserite 

KaeConnell, Mill lass 



Etratteer, Masy Jose 



% of 



UyWlMMMMNn 



Title 



Ammjod. 



w» *n >w>w>w 



Weekly 

tote to 



June 2 - 27 », 1958 
Asst. Prof., Forestry 100 
Jus© 9 - 20, 1950 



Asst. Prof., Nursing 
June 20 - July 3, 

• — »*■>— l«Mi — M*— — WMWllMlg- mill ill^f HJ 



100 



4316 



Asst. Prof., Hosae. Be. 100 



107.90 



Gross 
Bar nipgo 



06240 $156.00 $624.00 



215.80 



Assoc* Prof. , 2&sr©ing 
Assoc. Prof., I&irsins 


100 

100 


5889 
S8&9 


147.22 
147.22 


294.44 
294.44 


June 23 - 27. 1958 








Assoe. Prof., Hem Be* 


100 


6901 


174.52 


174.52 


June 30 - July 11, 195$ 


6931 
5889 
5889 
6240 


174.52 
147.22 
147.22 
156.00 




Assoc. Prof., Hoso Ec 
Assoc. Prof., t&irei&g 
Assoc. Prof. , Karsii^i 
Asafc« Prof. , Forestry 


100 
100 
100 
100 


349.04 
294.44 
294.44 

312*00 


July 7 » 25, 19SS 











6006 



156,15 



450.45 



* Hon- University l&aployee© 



rasi mm ssssiow 



June 19 - July 30. 1938 



Eatta. 

Afcraassoa, Doeis 
Andersen, Mien E. 
Br&iaCtiai* Gerard 
Calc&ell, Theodore €. 
Casy 9 Hazold W* 
Clifford ^ E&sard 
Goafcieo, Joseph 
Craig, £2&er£ M. 
Ebriick, Leonard H. 
Ges&lc, Philip &• 
GceestiEic&d* Suooer H. 
Heller* W&&&S 
Bolssicgg, Versaon P. 
Bull 9 Alsxs&tfer* Jr. 
Ra£lan s Si&ioy 
King* C- Hfcad©li 
U>viQ®3tea, Gideon B. 
KcKsaas^j, Mary 1. 
Miller 5 . Sk&ert: V. 
Moser, Bosald E. 

liver, Charles ?. 
*Pefctee 9 Joan 
Excel 3 Eeajss^a, Jr. 
aitclsij Walter S* 

Trias&ttli 9 Mrs. 'Asa 1. 
Jferloy* H« LeSatit! 
Hsgeier, Softest: §L 
fitfiaatrottt, Keanefih 
%asa 9 Boynood 
f$yane» Alfred SS. 



i 



iifcle 



•p 



% of 



o^* 



Asmszal 



LOO 



50 
50 



100 



Si 

50 



laser* 9 Speech 
Heed, Bepe. of Kat&t. 
&as£. &io£« » Gave. 
Pco£«4Hd«Depfi« ^History 
Pro£. » History 
lastr, j, Psychology 
Assfc. Ps?o£. a l&islc 
Xs&tr. » Bistaoxy 
Xostr. j Philosophy 
Prof, &H&, Depfc . »lSc<m. 
&83t.PKb£» 4 Eosa. Lsssg. 
Assoc- Prof • s Gossan 
Prof., Bagl&ssi 
&&S£mtWB&, 9 Boab X&og. 
As&t, Pro£. e EBgl&sfe 
Prof. * Sociology 
&ssc. Prof. s Food Tech. 
Instr. , l&kseation 
lestr. , Psychology 

-Xrscs?-. , Oheaiftfcey ■ ■ 
Prof, , Bqgligh 
Assoc* Prof* a jSduca. 

lasts* » Botsi^ 

Assfc. Prof* ? Shy a, 3d. 
P r o£. &Sd * Sept , , Otesu 

Isstr. s ClerssHs ICO 

Aasc. Prof.* Sfe?&* 100 

Peo£.» English 50 

Pro£** H$£ii 1' 

Assoc* Prof* 9 !&%c&. 
Assoc* Prof. » Sdaca. 
Icser. , C&essis&ry 



Y£xc Kate 



50 



li 
100 

100 



62| 



9829 

5304 



8684 



57 72 
4940 

4524 
9823 
3772 
7254 
S684 



7124 



4732 

4732 



mm. 

4316 




5533 
774S 
8684 



7254 



Weekly 
Ha Co to 

be oaif3 



* trc»*jkj^»j a?j (vj- a « w*t»rk •»*» mr a 



Cross 

JsarBinrco 



'••«-si.1a£ «)•<*•*■ >»?IiV« 



$128.70 $ 772. 2Q 



245.70 
132. 60 
118*30 
108, 55 
123. 50 
72.15 
123.50 
113.10 
245-70 
144.30 
H.67 



108.55 
66.30 
80,92 

188.10 



118.3® 
118.30 
233. ** 



75 



-96r&3- 

201,50 
174.52 

67.43 
1S6.00 
184.27 
139.10 
138.45 

96.85 
217.10 
147.22 
181,34 

96.52 



1474.20 
795.60 
709.80 

631.30 



74J 

432.99 

741,00 

676, €0 

1*74.20 

865.00 
544.02 

651*30 
397.00 

*m.32 

1120.60 
460.00 



. <&■« 



709.80 

830.70 
-5-2iv58 



1047.12 
404*5$ 



936. 



1105.62 

834.60 
830.70 
5&1.10 



4*>«i«» 



0S3.32 
1086^04 

579.12 



SECCoH? IE3 SESS101 



Jaly 24 - Set tester 3, 1958 



4ilca 9 IjaCl^ff ^. 
Aa&hosyjt Alls arc S. 
Bsrres s Zteon 0, 
^Busselj Bersard P. 
Clark , BzvM P.. 
^rsis- Soasld 
aisso££', HiltiflD 
o^iSj, George » Jr. 




^sst. Ps»£. » Covt. 
Assoc* Fro; 



■» * 



*j» 



Asst* Prof. r Irjgilsh 

&ss&. Prof^j, Ssglisl-i 
Asst.Bir. ,4?adio*¥iswal 
laser. , Irtish 
Assoc. Prof. 3 dove. 



160 
50 



5530 
6708 
£-00$ 
5564 

3772. 



4316 



69.22 
[67,78 
73.0? 



■• IU 



72.15 

118.30 

53«95 

160.8? 



415.32 
1006.20 
430. 42 
834. m 
432.90 

ym.m 



965.22 



\ \ 



Howards MasrsliaH C. 
gc^es* Soli a X,. 

Ma&£s?e<S£ s Jehn F. 

KcW&oz&zx:, Ecsrl J* 
f Astfctsr g. 



O* Lossy* Eeles F. 



*PCOC£Off. 



jsssas 0* 



Sogers j ?&&cstafc E. 
ge^Sj Israel U, 

Smith. B&srclel L. 9 Jr. 
*T£ltoa, SIcgeot'M. 



SB20&5D t&XB SSSSICM (Gent, ) 



HMUHpnma 

Prof* s Psychology 

„ Sociology 






Asss. 



Prof. a Stesiistsy 
$raf» t Speech 

Assoc • Psof*. S&ica. 



Asst 



Prof, s CfeeadstKy 

Assoc, 9eo£. * Hat!* 

I&St3?« 3 . SOSS* IjfiSg, 

Assoc* Pros. » Idgllsh 



ickS 






§6703 



100 

100 

73 

100 

100 



10C 



100 



7692 
5356 
5772 
S304 



55S4 



Afisdc* Psrof* » His&ozy 100 



6C06 

6006 
7234 

4?sa 

6435 

6?§S 



Hteekly 

Rate to 

foa paid 

$167*70 

96. 25 

133-99 

99.45 
.0 

.93 
154.05 
112.61 
150*15 
181. 34 
il'8.30 
160,87 
167.70 



217. io 



C&oss 

$1006.20 

576.90 
803.40 
86S.80 
596.70 

1302.60 
321* 58 
924.90 
675,66 
900. 2© 

LOSS. 04 
709.80 
963.22 

100S.20 



I 



tiQkm^VBiTCZSl&y &$loyee. 



I 



summ ssmm* mmmmm 



yj&u nm * in w wwwtw wtii WMimwil 



Approval is requested for the Stossar Session ossployifiiossfc of thus. 
following person at the. period" ©£ time designated. Sfeia is estre crapeavfei 
cleat for a regular teacher. 



«taa && - Sews ember 3, 1958 



B§5&— . -~ -^ --1 r— ffl?^ 5 

Gberlender, George J. testrsctor* €h&&» 



ffeekly 

% of taio&l Rate to ©ress 
S&aa .Rate 









62% 15564 086.93 §1043.16 



5OTSB Sn8B& OiSSISP EMFLOIME^ 



j "Hi*f*fr j r"i*"*T*TT*~'"TnrTiriTri*TTn tf* ■■— ■ i ■ ■ ■ -■ it*- mirr t mr * 



Dtortog the st&ss&r of 195$ s the following; ©£&££ fs@s£»er& will bs engaged 
in projects cossssctsd sith the sS&ra&gie Leegtt8g& Greet. 8$ecl£icslly, they 
will be ]»?esarl£8 course soserielfs a»d recorded tapes ft© fee used deric® 
eeedeaiic 195$* 5©. Bequest Id hereby s&de th&t tfeey fee ^isM the suia indicated 

frees fcriaegie Feuds. 



SSaoe 



Frefe&Gos? F. C. Ellert 
tosee. Pro£« Peter Heller 
Mrs* Sli&al&etti H. Trshsa, Inst. 

Professor Jtasss U, fferrigiso 
Professor Boeert i. Johssots 
P3?efes®er Sussoer H. 6reea£ield 

Professor Me&eader Sail 



Sssoisat 



Period of Ps^raes 



■**#* 



caamtm^tfJnn^Qg^iK^asMg^-iOa^iyatfwww^ 



ȣWl.t 



?3QrC5.00 
300.00 



400.00 



200. 



200.00 



Aa^asfc 3 - 30, 1958 
Jfcme 2 - 21 » 1958 
&zg3ust 3 » 2-0 f 1958 
Aqgusfc 3 - 30 a 1958 
Jusa 2 » 21, :I93S 
^igust 3 - 30* 1958 
Anpiafe 3 •• 30 a 1958 



additxce&l vsmnmi changes 



Add to $us»er Session list: 



* CGS&D0N, Richard K 9 , Assistant Professor of Education, f roai 
July 24 - Septessbsr 3, 195© a His weakly rat© of compensation 
should be 2% % of annuel salary or $150.15. 



Contract Eeseareh 



SMITH, H. X. U. a Head, Bapartnent of Geology, for research under 
Navy contract #TO£R-2242(00) for the period Kay I through Kay 31, 

1958 and for the period September I, 125& through April 33, 1959 
at the rate of $182.44 per month. 

SMITH, H. T. 0*. , Head, Department of Geology, for research under 
Rovy contract #2368&-2242(G0) for the period July 1 through 
July 31, 1953 for a total amount of $690 ,00. 

STSIH, Richard S. , Associate Professor "A" of Chassis try for re- 
search under 17. S. Kavy contract #BSM~2151 free June 1, 1958 
to September 2, 1953 at $155.00 per &eek. 

CAEPIR0, L. A. , Assistant Professor "A" of Gheiaistry for research 
under Contract A? 18 (603) -114 fro® June 2 to August 31, 1953 at 
the rate of $113.25 per ®eek. 

SAKTILLI, A. A. , Instructor "A" of Chemistry for research under 
Air Force Contract AF 18(603) -114 frca June 1 to August 31, 1953 
at the rate of $102.00 per ©eek. 



Salary Ghanao u nder Harrington 



DAYTON, Jaaes W. , Associate Dean and Director of Extension 
Service. 

October 1, 1956 $207.30 

January 20, 1957 215.55 

January 19, 195a 223.75 



$10,779.60 
11,203.60 
11,635.00 



* B©n University essg»Ioyee 



Tfcaca adjustments oso dee the follewleg ex^lo^ees usder 

Chapter 753 ©2 tto Acts of 1957 



Defesrre© 1 Preset lone 







Ferae? Salary 










10-1-56 


©as© ©£ 


Increase 


r-j-^ 


Salary 


Goes ©f 


Tie la & Kese 




Xseress&e 


Salary 


10-1-56 

6,981 


10-6-57 
7,254 


MJeeteent 


Associate Pre&sseer 


6,708 


9-1-57 


6,981 




C©$%, Gladys 


451.5© 


Cullen, Hales 


6,435 


9-1-57 


6,708 


6,708 


6,981 


451,50 


G&&&®i?i 9 Geesg®, Jr. 


6,162 


9-1-5? 


6,435 


6,708 


6,981 


929.25 


Howard, S!G£sh£Xi C. 


6,435 


9-1-57 


6,708 


6,708 


6,981 


451.5© 


Lss*e, Es&erfc P» 


6,43$ 


9-1-57 


6,708 


6,708 


6,981 


451.50 


Oliver, Cheslos F. 


6, 70S 


9-1-57 


6,981 


6,981 


7,254 


451.50 


Ztoberte, Jehss 3. 


6,435 


9-1-57 


6,708 


6,981 


7,254 


929.25 


Sollasee, 8. E&mesa 


6,435 


9-1-57 


6,708 


6,981 


7,254 


929.25 


Stele, Eiehard S. 


6,435 


Merit Steps 


6,708 




252.00 


sfjf^en, E&^BSsd 


6,435 


Merit Steps 


6,708 




94.50 


2eeade?, Jcfea 


6,435 


9-1-57 


6,?0S 


6,708 


6,981 


451.50 


Rlehases, ©soi^^ SI, 


6,435 


2-3-57 


6 8 ?Q8 


6,981 




346.50 


Sioger, Freak 


6,162 


2-3-57 


6,435 












2-2-58 


6, 70S 


6,435 


6,708 


183.75 


Aesis&eafc Pre-fesssr 














Allee 9 Lssttar A, 


5,304 


9-1-57 . 


5,538 


5,538 


5,772 


387.00 


JHssbs®, S&ret* 


5 9 304 


9-1-57 


5,538 


5,538 


5,772 


387.00 


■ Eabbard, V£e!s&rj 


5,538 


9-1-57 U 


r. ©f Absence 


6,006 




432.00 


J Ridden, Ee&@?t M. 


5,304 


Teffitnatea 1 8-31-57 


5,538 




216.00 


Kegsk^mki, Stephen 


5,538 


Hsrit Steps 


6,006 




432.00 


Lerkie, Istas^ P. 


5,538 


9-1-57 


5,772 


6,006 


6,240 


796.50 


Manfred! , Jefca F. 


5,538 


9-1-57 


5,772 


6,006 


6,240 


796.50 


Peiree, Henry B.» Jr. 


5,304 


9-1-57 


5.538 


5*772 


6,006 


796.50 


Biggs* Hai<i& 


5,304 


9-1-57 


5,538 


5,538 


5,772 


387.00 


*fcge? s ©©sale* 


5,304 


9-1-57 


5,538 


5,772 


6 9 006 


796.5© 


Centime, Jeeeeh 


5,304 


2-3-57 


5,538 












2-2-58 


5,772 


5,772 


6,006 


567.00 


TressSbull, Asm fi« 


5,070 


2-3-57 


5,304 












2-3-58 


5,538 


5,304 


5,538 


157.50 


Professor 














Little, Eeary Bo 


7,436 


9-1-57 


7,748 


7,74© 


8,060 


516.00 


tai©, tilllian B. 


7,748 


9-1-57 


8,060 


8,060 


8,372 


516.00 


Smdiasr, J&sse 6. 


7,436 


9-1-57 


7,748 


7,748 


8,060 


516.00 


Verley, H. L©1©®$ 


7 ,436 


9-1-57 


7,748 


7 S 748 


8,060 


516„0@ 


Caneon, Gs^sge W, * 


7,748 


9*1*57 


8,06® 


8,060 


8,372 


516.00 


Fel^^Hj l&feert S. 


7,436 


9-1-57 


7 9 ?$m 


7,748 


8,060 


516.00 


Lsssgford, Je&efla ¥. 


7,748 


9-1-57 


8,0§0 


8,060 


8,372 


516.00 


Cetoell, lifted M. 


7 ,436 


2-3-57 


7,748 


7,748 Tc 


sra. 8-31-57 


108.00 


Proteose? "A" 


8,372 


9-8-57 


8,736 


9*100 


9,464 




Lsr#im s Arthisr S. 


1,246.00 


1 Allen, Bessie* 


8,372 


9~8*»57 


8,736 


8,736 


9,100 


609.00 


1 CreessKm, B?@sl£©rd 


8,oos 


7-28-57 


8,372 


8,736 


9,100 


1,204.0® 


1 Lsehassa, Villlsm H. 


8,008 


9-8-57 


8,372 


8,736 


9,100 


1,246.00 


Litslsy,, llarrsa 


7,644 


9-8-57 • 


8,008 


8,372 


8,736 


1,248.00 



~2~ 



tic & Nasss 


10-1-56 


DfiSe of 
XneveaAe 


I&&&C&S3 

S&lary 
7,748 

a, 060 

7,436 
8,060 
7,748 

8,060 

6,708 
6,162 


10-1-56 

7,748 
8,060 
7,436 
8,060 
7,748 
8,060 

6,708 

6,162 


Salary 

10-6-57 

8,060 
8,372 
7,748 
8,372 

8,060 
8,372 

6, §31 

6,435 


Goat oS 


iAociat© Psrstesor "A" 


7,436 
7,74© 

7,124 
7,748 
7,436 

7,748 

6,435 
5,889 


9-1-57 
9-8-57 

9-8-57 
9-8-57 
9-8-57 

9-8-57 

9-8-5? 
9-8-57 




Field, Millies 
Becker, ttilliosi B. 

Blaladell, Matfcta* 

Busm, R&dio 
Fagersen, Xg^isig 

Asststaafc Prafesao? "A" 


516.00 
522.00 

522.00 
522.00 
522.00 
522.00 


Callahfia, Jasata H. 
jarvssa©, Bis®? 


456.75 

456.75 



Head aff B spagfem&fc "A" 
Rhodes, Arnold 



lo.asi 



1,169.75 



I 



i 



?aO?OSAl ?0£ SAIARf IHCOASU 

*»U» 4M« (f^AOt Vi'W »*W 4TM Vt» •".'% «NX» «:«¥ «/«■ ■**< '*•* **** ft -|f| M)t i«MW *wr«> .WJ <**»» •**» utU HW 4W» Mk» «w 

A t T K 1 

2SL2SS&S! 

The earellimi&nt of 5,100 oftudonto ia the fall of 1958 will be the 
largest £m the history of the Qal-eersity. Shin reserd esrollaNKit will &e 

£oll&*od in the fell of 1959 by eMtlser ssmt Mgh of 6^100 students, teeh 
year, am far as «se esn look into the future, will establish a new hl$h in 
easel Ivaoat. these ®m psste in enpollaeet, oeoeoeeey to nast the &m®fan& 
aunfeer ef eollsge-age pejpuletion, will result in suMiti®s»l saoed© far highly 
qualified faealty every year is* e>8€t& College, Seheel and Division of the 
Hfeiiversity « 

The E3$©£ serious pr«S»le® feeing the fteivereity ef Massachusetts 1® 
that of settles additional teeehera md keeping enoagh of it® well-qualified 
teaa«ta?® to take csre of present and futere a@e^s«, Maintaining present skIsc* 
ing iStoersity aeederale standards will be dlffieelt <teinsg the eo«aing year© 

m fee University isisr«i?&ses it® student eacellneat. there will ba && increas- 
ing s&p foet»ea the deorad end supply of qualified eolleg* teachers, T&s 
sher&ag© alrsedy ssssi^ts. 

If the University is going to ssssgu^® end told the well-qualified 
people for college iaatruefcion, eelarlee trout lie laesttaeed. Ketlenal groups g 
for aaeiqple, the President;* s Ceoaieeiea ea lfe&@t£ea beyond the High 8©ho©I & 
h®m ealied for at leant toit&iing the average iettSl of faculty salaries in the 
next fine to tea y«rs» this »ans increasing salaries hj 20 ^er eeat &a%&®& 
esch of the next five year® ©r by 10 per cent dwrissg each of the bskc. tee years. 

M@ tse&tew that «y prepeeel for salary inersases ehould be nade ia 
^rlm of the financial situation ia rise Caanaesfaalta of B«is@achusett®. 'Sbis 

request,' zhm®£ms® 9 for increasing eelarlee ie ®< ^ary nodeee ose» It ie the 
first Bmp of the iMwraity t® psoteet it© p»'fe®^i©nal people from loeleg 
farther purehaelng pmmz a® -g&e eeet of living S^sree^e© to ferif&g saleriee to 
the le^ei i^bere they ®hml& he 9 aa4 to eeehle it to get &$*d bold well*queli£ied 
people ia e ^iglaly eeegtetitlve s®3*@t e 

fhle ia nor. a misr pceblen hut os&e that President Hether €ite«S S=sa hi® 
a^a&esn»at to the ©awsrs^r of &3eseaehuaet&a in ®®z®bm p 1357 ae the ss®sfe is^ort^^t 
asatter £$*iia$ «^te Khsivereity nov and as it plani for the futere. 

!?e to^@ isa^e. a ($©£&ile*i end careful, re^lea of the salary situatioa at 
the Unlveralty. thle TO'tri^? €^¥^iop^ two fundaeaatel s^iat© for ealassy imxomm 
es follows: 



2. 



<X) (a) That else pm£®mi&®&l raoke (Xeotruetor, 10 aeatfas 
and "A 51 ihcousfr B©ad of OapaittBaeat, 10 ®»aths and 
"A", and Swatts) fcwe tensity &a# adndLaiatratlv* 
poreoaaal, mvd fct*©&& holding aquivaleat gr<a$2© In 

©Star ^gita«OTfi5 8 be eaovod ^ oss® (I) gra<3© in fcha 
Sarirlngton salary aeho&ila ladtar* 



Pwmjfit 

S&MB& ©f College of ^griculfetsm & 

Director, lE^offiB«ot Seattet 
©a&a of Collie of Arte £* Seteaeea 
®@sm of Sc&ool of lesg£tt$©r;tag 
Bead of Bl T $iti«» 

KaasI of ©epartssiafc "A" 
!ta^ of Oepartsaettt (10 ®ea« ) 



Professor M A M 

P»£®»$sr (16 mea.) 

lss@@ki® P&efeeeor "A" 
Ass©elat© BF©to®or (10 eas») 

Assis(asit ?»£e»« M A W 

Assistant Pmto@er (10 uses*) 

Instructor "A 88 

Instructor C&® oo»- ) 

<b) this eolny change represents an 

per ee&t If* $&e ®almry budget* 



Grades 




£SS 


2a 


27 


28 


as 

24 

23 


as 

25 

as 

24 


20 


23 
21 


to 

IS 


21 
19 


18 
26 


19 

I? 


u 


1? 
15 


u 


13 



increase ©£ ©ally 6 



(2) (o) TSsot, in addition, nee 1 grades fee established for tfeesa 
faculty &M adnlnistrative personnel (A©s£&tai&£ Pro* 

foooor, 10 mm$$m awS "A" tbxeugh Heed of Bq*artwat, 
10 neoths sM i9 h n ) tsbo sbsw esgespttoml qualifications 
«md deissaa&igfcrate exceptional quality p@r£ore»i&® of 
service. a@$® proficiency gray grnie® wmld be 
reeennandad for certain individuals., those already here 
©sad ess? people. 



®E.,^^Lj^-Si^l^SffiLJ^S&IS 



Head of Sapaxtaaaat "A" 

Bssa4 of DepaxtaiSQt {I® 



«) 



mavi 



Professor "A? 
Professor (10 saes. > 

Associate Professor M A ,r 
Associate Professor (10 raos*) 

Assigtaat Fr©£@s«er P 'A" • 
Assistant Prof«88or (10 hs**) 



24 
22 

24 

21 

19 

19 

17 






(b) T.h® mtdbltdbBamt of new gpadoa fos? individuals %rith 

q^i&lif icattoas «fe© d$s*a«£tfata oa&copfciionnl 

to ba«tly aoadad* MRssy of oar coapatltlva 

institutions hava for yii?fflr& ©$»«&&$<& 



on a 
Bant 



£0 tneognitlon feosr 01 
Kaaasd thair paopXo aceosrding to ability 



-o a* 



up to assy® ®sik&& tha faculty and 

of tho Uaivwrai^ for alalia? affost arad 
but has not pxwidad a policy for & wmsstt 



initial 



with thm 




*■ 



©£ a 



fs^tassaat&fetea of &ib»<§ salary pxopoaala will pxovida 
s&sBdis at low east to &b& Coaaoaivaalth of litt&aacausatta, 
ism vhaa f90ll<*<8n8ll£iad atofnaa tonal ©toff will fe§m 

capital ootlay |»«'«$mm to tsalui cam « 
aaat of tho youth £s& $&^ach»aatta, to giro tho 
uallty teoahias^ professional, tonhalgftl m& ffo&naseh 



Foass asajo? ttseuit® eats &® achiawed by «M.si© of this proposal 



a$a$ toe 
j to neffit aaat of tho imsmmm la tbm cost of lj 



(2) && wsiBaatly anaatod ml&taj pollsy to ««f«&©at«fc individual® 
for nfcat thay as® aafiually worth 9 iastoad of paying tfcfta 

for temgimifcj al®sa^« Da this way* ma ®sa ^sss^oufatgo and 



*,® f 



skilli 



Mb 



to &te C«mms$s»lth of Bssaachasatt®. 3M& 

i iaasaa®a ia apa 
adivid 



<4) A loag^tOKn ianrastaant to is^rw® ous? policy and pro* 

km^iMg and notlva&ias Uhlwsrsity 
of Assistant Fvafassor t&ftwag^ Umd 



4, 



Mere detailed iafoeeafttlon ©bout thm neM for the proposed salary 
incseasee follows: 

&& e«gs©rte4 earlier e low salaries Am the asajor obstacles* fee Vh® 
Ua&versity of Massachusetts to *g«ur© end refc&ta well-quallf led teachers. 
Sable I stars a eaes^arisoa of the cta*ge in purchasing power in she last 
sewnteaa year* for teacher® at the tiniversity tsa/S. individuals in other pre* 
fessioaal &s*d c&etspa&iea gsoups* Ifelmsm salaries are wiMsd ia this table foe 
fcha ftolversity faulty, Xt Should &© meted that only a fan teaeliewL are 
actually ut the snxiBuno iss the respective gf&4» listed* Hhiie the actual 
sssssisusi salaries foe Oniverslfcy t^sctaer© hsm increased substantially since 
1940 9 tbo puectmsiiag poster (which reflects the ctelinlssg ?alue of the dollar) 
has iseeoosod only slightly. She purchasing psw€$? of fcta full professor 8 %te io 
at tba ssmtaka at the ItaivsaEBlty, has increased appvssimtoiy 5 per ooat ®is&® 
194% for associate peofcaaor tho Increase has hmm ebonc 6 g>er cent* foe 
assistant professor th®m uos a slight p©ipg@&t©ge dse&ease and foe inssesaefcor 
tli© increase was about 35 per &mz, Other dam available (not shewn in table X) 
Shew that discretionary purchasing power, or real teeosaa after federal net 
iseosse tas 9 has declined foe all grades sine© 1940. If sllowaaees ere Esade foe 
tasse© ? the increase in ©at distpoaaolo £»©» feoaa 1939 to 1956 on a national 
pae C4§g»ite level ess 51.7 per c<$at w Shis is «®re titan 50 per cent abev@ tliat 
of the Onlveessit^ faculty* 

Coa^aeison of the puschasieg power changes foe University taaaliaeo 
with Stasa of oehae pm£m®imm mad occupations is wmmslt®^* xn Ueaoaobnaotts 
t&e i&avaaae fiawr &4sgtesy isoekaes ©in^© 1939 ^©a ®lso«st 80 ^4? Ci®at im$ foe 
publi© ®dbD©I toaclsoea thm $jm%<mm was saoeo than £5 pav €@at« Tbaea uas <al®o 
noea e&an a 72 p«e aant inceaaaa in poeehaaing ponae ia egis^e^t to the wmig&&® 
pms e^pita itmo®^ pays»at lasraaaea of Indlvidaale in Itaaaaglasgaistg* Oueins 
da® yeae 1957*»SS ts&^ M^h f4b@0i© in tha Ooonan»aaltb ®e# ©ffeeing lajr^se 
«i#4^,^i@i to toe baglaui&tg taaanae than wa offer aft tba iss©te?£©toe l@^al e 

On a mtiooal level Che pesehaalng pwm® of the us-weaga p^r®teian» 
fe®4?^i on Mt l^^S? laaseaeed B4 ^ae €®at b#.tw®®n 1939 $m& 1953<. tt® ieaeeaee 
foe statists eae 4S pes? ©s&at, She is^e©sui®i in pi$K'«Ij©sit£8g pssw for eeet 
ooeupatioiiSj, including those eitsd ia Table X» were eoaeideeably abeve theee 
for Uelearelssf teaehexs. 

Cte a national level befcwsn 1940 m& 1953 , the tocseeg^e foe f\»ealt«»e@ 
woehwewae 61 |wse eent» foe bitessdiKS^ coal IB par cent 8 fee auteaaefeit® "soek@j?@ 
34 pee c«t & and 2S per ©m^t foe electrical wrtees* Foe ail wssmfa^fcwris^ 
warkerajt tlse isBer©ss# %?as 48 p@e ©aat» 



5. 



I 



S I. 

mams &® tm 



mwm&m m wM&mmsm ntsaa mom m 



m 



Msmsxtz a? mMMmBtim 



ft is ash w.^iA^M «aias Fiir**. m^v 



1940 



«atfWMRWanMMttriQfKWM'MMlW 






Xnesanso in Fu3?e&R$iing 



(tm«MMWAnUWBM*f^MeaM>ftvtttt*v*«i 



test.. ?£»£,, 



3*«3© 

2, too 



y B «7 






5,278 

3,» 



,@36 



<s 



, SSI 



^5o SX 

-0. 



if* 



c^tK^ip'j3=iro^v^ft^«^isnmimw«iw 



<l93$-i9SK*^Bia»fe) 










'»*MHi«ro*ss*»Mi'«t«aK«ft«.^w«.s.'* o**4. •erwMMwaratMHtu-iv*' wr s« »/JvivutLX7rM* J mi tutu re»» AWri**veiM*flWJi.fiw.v a ia« > iM « » B l M M > «i»ii < wi *iV ii:g^9ar.-T^:|«m«id^^^ «<hi»-»' 



mn 



i 



lkm&i&ts 



4 y I2; 



<9aAfM«SJO«9M» 



flf 






*^$4X 



w-rH*gg m i^^t»«fc T t M w tiwi *w<ftqqafwa- , wp»*atwwt. ' I^jb^^ Mi ^ ija«tv^#vaw«flc»awr*Ka itn *i m < ff r Fi^ »a*optwwi,-nt*y >> w -»^-&»^ ^w^a>u.iwi^rt^taw^ wrv*u*m&w&i***t4eo&*#>'muM m s G< m. * m m< B w remuagamMnitm urjajjva* iw-k wMtt»^-<uu*»Jfc«P'sp«M«a*:s*afr' 



trWftlMtHW*--.* 



If 53 



lfS3 






W& 



^8 



l« 






9* 



«*& = 
'■$ * 

4» 

IS 

lib c. 

»3 



&!$24 






>OT 3 



«n 



f?« 



3»«6S> 



ft 



wnvMtwu arawotB^raftuateManjwwwiMMatiM* fc- f ilrtaEww^atBWJCTM* tt»w|i(siwii«wBOiijf««e i<7s*tcmMn aw; 






fs!#j tad & S&tagr 6. 




6. 



¥shias XX end III absw that faculty and adoiaistsstlvs salaries At 
tba Bniwirslty asta toss? than in assay athar ®tafc© universities ^snieb offer 
siusilar diversified s»?i©®® for its youtb md ofcl&er elfcl«*ry vithin the 
agates, 2he tables coHgiare tho aalaaclas at the ftoiversity of ttaaaacbusotts 
&ith salaries at otihac universities. Such eaqparlsans are «tre«ely imgmXamt 
baeaase thay reflect' t&s e&foutfc of co?s$ati&&sm Coat exists bmmmm the oni- 
vs^sity of Stesesebusetts and ether institutions vifdh regard to ^ttejaetistg 
a&d testing its® faculty. %hs aangiatltioB frssa private industry and f^mmmmttsX 
uglifies i«scraa®» tli© ©0*if*taity with tba alveary existing ssob2aa. It is 
isportant to not® toss tables XX and XXX that tte salary sehseu2e at 8$b® Uni- 
versity is substantially iwsr than salary ©&ta8ul<ss at ®£hm institution®. 

Another $M$mttm& fSator to so?ag£d@r is that cost® to &B»ar©t and 
the surrounding ar©& are bilbos thaa t&ay are in tba tees© cities of other 
institutions £& fcba ConaKKaflialth and the Katlon. Seu&iag rentals, construction 
c©$ts «£&d ©titer factor aaaftseXXing tba cost of living are higher to Aulbinret 
than In o&ter c<wifflun£ttac fte siwrsg® «timte$ east of aagr dialling} bail* 



teis® 1956 in Ac&isssf^ for «&ssg*l® e nas $13*061 caspcorM to an average aa|l? 
seated east of $20,459 for mil &*alii&^ units reported in ton GaaMNwattltb. *** 



A ansa cespaslsea ©f salaries sad east of lining do®s not pssssnt 
ell the fe^og'tant aspects «f the problea. If «s@ asp® to get eell-qnalif lad 

naonXa to taaeb our mtmfim sust increase sMgh warn $m& tba cost of livisst! 
if tba faculty »s to mhmm in tba gains caflsssias peasant prngem®* % fes> 
tba pmmnt tiasa tba ceaeheK' at tba W,W!£giiSy has not shared in tba increased 

$tas<ted of living. Ifos&e ta§ h@m a vmgf lap lag in taaebass ©at*ebisa® up 
I^^s^aists padnt ant gnat **&&$ pviaa iaval will essa? no fairly ©t@a% and 



^i^s only adnar intarsujpti«tt9 isarins ^® s«& SCI ysars^ giving um h% if 67 a 
ffrte® Xswal sousjbly 2® to 30 p^c cant bi^bio 1 ^eii®, Has jpKgsaat @na "^** 



Faculty eppQiEXamsLt® isa tba variens calS,agos» icbools» and divisiens 
of ^^2 HMwiesity avs <fl^nBtod to &a«® os &@ 'smantly |»s^s«iiffig tba »<,!&, dSjgtaa 
tefos^ thagr as© ansloyad ftill-tisaao Xn this ^g®^d s tba ©hortege of «s!2* 
fnalif ted ta-jscta'© Is well Ism^« at tba $m&m& tlasa« Iha passsntag* of nssly 
affsintad foll*tiag asl&4®s taasbsvs balding &m Oast«r*s &ggr#^ ®a a aatlanal 
l®v@l 9 has dscsaasod Z5, 1 p®% cant dwis^ tbe p^rtod 2953-54 to 1956-57. Hwly 
8^#iat@^ aollaga taadbsss teldis^ l@ss Am ^^Masta^'s dagtaa %wm tecs s ®aj@ad 
by t6<,9 p&g cant duriJ9g tte ea^ ^artod of tl« c ^ J ^ It is m&mmly dUtUult 
ia vi@s o£ this sbacgag® aifd tba caqpatltion fteun atbar fawtizmimm sm& iadustsy 
idkicb ®££m ws%k ^ij^^ir mlmim m attract inAlHinalif iod as® t@acb®rs, Tb© 
pKablaai of socsuitmaat is &©tfei? <ante$to©4 by loskiigat tba following @o^te 



1 'te@Mab»ss®att® )B@f®^trwi©t of Ommemmz BLvimijtm of K@©^s«b 9 Join of ^^^. 
»®g^^(, «^?i®@d Augnse, I9S7o 



2* f#5rss®n E, &l<&m '■Volliags AArtaiatsatian la a Sasidly C^tongiag ReafBaay'V 

,^^^ito M i^^fei GaUaa juissisp s^«®^^ 1957, p®&® 535 c^a«fei»s 

3Ps«fsssor S?iOTS3!^r 3li®hzmt «f Bsssard l£?i^«siKy](>o 

by tba Bttsaasab Mirislm of tba national location Assoaiatian« 1957 » m° 27-18 



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of actual salavios glvao to £ull**£tea stow fcoeselasog's appointed on 
1* 1957: 



Xa Cte College, of Affto & Sctaost® 

$4,316, $M!6» $4,316, |4 & 524, $4,340 

Xn the School o£ £^£s§e®rts$g 

$4*732, $5,®70« $5*538 
Otfeaar Schools {Etasteg f , S%y@£eail Bdueetloa, toss® Bcenoates, Sdueatiea) 

$4,316, $4,732, $5,070, #5,304 

Uttaa these s&i&rto <ss?@ iiwto^d In tls@ Msb£ e£ opportunities 
these gstoplo may tar& Its csi^teeehing positions, it beeeoes obvious thste the 
tSs&wcslty saamfe »&€ substsafcial salary imzmmw i£ it is to got the kind© 
of pmpl® *$io -alii giw <dm tin&vsssity ieteileefnisl lesdevship end psewld® 
the kinds of instvue&isn thafc mzt students ®hmiX4 b® g@t£lagc 

It Is? significant to note that last Jtsse the a-esreg* stasrtitsg aalesy 
of Qn&veraity ®£ Hesseehesetto graduates with a IJ« in Bsgiaeeriag, employed 

©Ist^ssTOg, mm $3,920 a year, 

It in iapertent to look at tte position of the soilage teacher «ii&- 
ia the €«mt®rt of ®g© & nalasy, and rank, fas average teacher at tsa Haiw^stty 
of HassaShusetts cespletes Iran five to f if teea ymm &s ease at els® iastsueto? 

oic assistant ps?o£e@907 less!. 1® is shout 41 yarn old wfesa h@ beeostes an 
fiSSPOGiat® frofessgor. and tiili b® appfaRiiaetely 50 y@as?® of ago befora Is® is 
S»an»sotodl to a full pro£®s®oEi§ktg>c Hany eeapateat tmsfimm at the University 
never beceea professors ©r associate professors* 

Tte average salarieg of University tesicter® -foiloHS: 

Professor (5© ymm eld) §8 S X58 

Assoeist© Srsfssser (41. jmm old) 6^&84 

4»istaat Professor 09 years old) 5J9Z 

lastruetor (34 ymm old) 5 9 00£ 

12te pathetic position of the Qaivsrsity toaster is quito apparent 

from the data presented above. She average assistant g»£»sor vifeh at least 
■f iva yoaaf® of eoaahim; «8Bj®ifi«aBo as&4 costly edaeaftion bobiad his r^soi^as an 
atweaso is&som of $5 9 7f2 uoila «smis^ plunbe&s &M ®&®&t,wt®iaim and oth^sf® iss 
aisaila^ «M£c«patioii ga?m^^ r^s^i^@ aueh highair s^lasi^s, 

at tte Uoi,-98isiCy asi iDofgruetos* 34 yaas® oM asud ©aiming $5 $006 m*st 

torch sist^Ba y«s®^^ b@f©x« to in pi?eaaotad to a £all pmimmtsM® if a position 
Is awailabla, this as^mats to em avsvass y^arlf ine^@a®a of $194 a y«ar. 



FOLIC*: Oil OPERATING FHSDS AH© 8tS8SffU8OTg PXA»KB2S 






And whereas 



And ^©"KTSSS 



the Board of Trustees o£ the University of Massachusetts 
recognises a policy of public; trust inherent in 3aai»tsin<» 
ing a program of high qualitative standards as well as 
quantitative enrol latent s at the tfai varsity of lHassaehusetta • 

sueh high at&adarda are reflected in past appropriations of 
ah© General Court support lag a highly ce&petent faculty with 
necessary tBAintenaace and service funds to adequately support 
an educational program comparable t© other universities of 
bigjh standard and national reputation •• 

the Senegal Court has provided, oa reeeneendatien ©£ succes* 
sive Cfcwernera, appropriations for new buildings tm& facili- 
ties adequate to admit increasing numbers of students t with 

sesee of these facilities ne& ready to aeccsaatodate incre§t&&d 
enrolls® ate - 



kn& whereas siany isore hijghlv email fled students are seeking asia&ssieiis 



There for be it resolved: 



That future neer and additional earoHseaaata above those 

established in the aeads&ic year 1957*58 are to be allowed 
as soon es appropriations are jacraaaed^ to penal £ new adais* 
sieos aad to provide £ct and raaintaia the already established 
educational standards of the University of Msssaehueatts* 



wmn b. wbiss, coa&m, sesot© states axr ot&s 



Bq it resolved that the Trustees ©£ the University of l&sssettgsstts 
stress their <&ep sppres&stioa of the esses^plsry services of SooaXd 8,, 

tihita, Gsloasi, QSdF, e^ea the occssiso of his collet &em of ^efcy es 
Professor <&&$ Ghsimee o£ &ho Be^srtiasnt of Air Sc loses && eke- BSlverslty. 

£&?i«g; his three years* toss of duty, CotasejiL Hlsifce fass cooperated 
ehelOhssrtodly £?&th the B&iver&ity sdsoisdstrstiss, faculty sod standouts; 
he h&8 enfccaeed the ssessiisu of the Air Force S0KC sod hs&$ helped to ssalse 
it so effective pert o£ the Osiversity progress of st&dies* She sssssro^s 
etescfaSs tihe feusn^a ©tsjd£©«3 aadsr his direct lea esaS 53k© hss© getae ©a to 
serve their cssatry &© the siil&esy services are eleqjiseat es&s^ples of 
the offect&vesees ©f his service to the University of SSassschasetts sod 
to the doited States Air Force* 

13$ heeer his es he lias effectively serried est his &ai responsi- 
bilities end hsssie&i&ed the interest of the University e£ g&sssehosetss 

eraS of t&e felted Ststes Air tforee is gi^feg tr&iaiag for yeasg ®&® for 
life is the sir ego of today s&d the deesdes ssfoead. 



Presidest of the tft&iversity 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
July 1, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, Haigis, Hoftyzer, McDermott, 
Miss Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To approve expenditures from unrestricted 
funds made by the President during the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1958 as listed 
on the attached statement. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to spend in the 

year beginning July 1, 1958 for the further- 
ance of the University program such sums as 
in his discretion are necessary from the in- 
come on unrestricted Endowment Funds not to 
exceed $1,500, and such additional sums from 
unrestricted current gifts to the University 
that are deposited in the University Fund as 
may become available not to exceed $2,500 for 
the period. 

President Mather discussed appointments, promotions and 

other personnel changes and on his recommendation, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following personnel actions. 
(See attached lists.) 

The President and Treasurer described the proposed Uni- 
versity budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1959. After 
questions and discussion, the Trustees 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to request 
the following special items in the budget 
for the fiscal year July 1, 1959 through 
June 30, 1960: 



2013 



Unrestricted 
Trust Funds 



Endowment Funds 



University Fund 



Personnel 
Actions 



Budget - 
Special Items 



2014 



TRUSTEE 



Student Union 
Budget 



Signing of 
official docu- 
ments - 
Treasurer's 
Office - 
L. Lawrence 
Taylor and 
Robert E. 
Heywood 



Extension of 
contract - 
Lei and, Lars en, 
Bradley and 
Hibbard 



Extension of 
contract - 
Whitman and 
Howard, Inc. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Library books $100,000 

Reimbursable research 100 ,000 

Commonwealth Scholarships 25,000 

Roads, walks, parking areas 200,000 

Equipment 100 ,000 

Payment to Town of Amherst 100,000 

Motor Vehicles 43,710 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the Student Union budget for the 
fiscal year July 1, 1958 through June 30, 
1959 in the amount of $247,315 and also to 
approve transfer of $20,000 from the Student 
Union Food Service Fund to the Student Union 
General Fund, and $10,000 from the University 
Store Fund to the Student Union General Fund, 
to be made on or after July 1, 1958. 

It was 

VOTED To authorize L. Lawrence Taylor, Controller, 
and Robert E. Heywood, Assistant Treasurer 
of the University of Massachusetts, as 
directed by the Treasurer, or in his absence, 
to sign or endorse in the name of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts such official 
documents and vouchers, including checks, 
drafts, certificates of deposits and with- 
drawal orders, as require the signature of 
the financial officer of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to extend for the 
period July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959, the 
present contract with Leland, Larsen, Bradley 
and Hibbard of Boston, for the architectural 
consulting service of Mr. Niels H. Larsen at 
a total payment for the period not to exceed 
$4,000 at the same hourly rates as therein 
provided with mileage allowance at 8 cents 
per mile. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to extend the 
present contract with Whitman and Howard, 
Inc. , of Boston, for consulting engineering 
services for the period of July 1, 1958 to 
June 30, 1959 at a total payment for the 
period not to exceed $8,000 at the hourly 
rates therein provided. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To delegate to the Trustee Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds full power to act 
for the Board of Trustees in authorizing 
the award of a contract for Physical Educa- 
tion Playing Fields under Item 8258-37 of 
Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve tuition fee for the non-program 

students of the G. E. Pittsfield Engineering 
Program in the amount of $25.00 per semester 
credit hour effective with the fall term in 
September, 1958. 

It was 

VOTED : To sell 100 rights of Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the following resolution: 

WHEREAS, The Armed Forces Industrial Security 
Regulations issued by Department of Defense 
established procedures for granting security 
clearances to private contractors' facilities 
where access to classified information is re- 
quired for contractual or other purposes, and 
this Security Regulation is applicable to this 
University; and 

WHEREAS, This Security Regulation requires 
personnel security clearances for all officers 
and directors who will have access to classified 
information in the conduct of the corporate 
business except those officers and directors 
who are United States citizens and not designated 
as requiring clearance or access to classified 
information; be it 

RESOLVED, That the officers and directors (in- 
cluding Trustees) other than those required to 
be cleared shall not require, nor shall have 
and can effectively be denied access to classi- 
fied information in the possession of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, and do not occupy 
positions that would enable them to affect 
adversely the organization policies or practices 
in the performance of classified contracts for 
the Department of Defense. 



2015 



Physical 
Education 
Playing 
Fields 



Tuition Fee - 
G. E. Pittsfield 
Engineering Pro 
gram (non-program 
students) 



Stock 



Resolution 

Security 

Regulations 



2016 



TRUSTEE 

Trust Fund In- 
terest Account 
- Cash variance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write off 
cash variance to the Trust Fund Interest 
Account of an average as of June 30, 1958 
of $15.67. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




]_ Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



&« A,t>„ 



mivmm:n of mas: skits 



M 



w fren toftomsi on IforAstrlctad SodoMMnt Fto 
Cor th« parted Ally l, 1957 ~ j ttM 30 195^ 






sialoss - 10 Umehftoaa for ?«n te&rie^a Waete^ 
s4«u£ galea - 7 LunchiKH>« for Rev KoglAiid Laad- 
Grcnt Coll«s«o - Suum? §as*ion 
f ' ■'■'^ "" ? IwnclMioB* - ruiaic ftelatioac Matfttiag 

b; '" 4 Jl ' -.■' ~ * lM»ch«on for candidata for A»Mtuttm 

Trawtuxrar ' « poftitiea 
KA»£inga - suppllM fer Fr«*S»nAa Riws«ptAoD 

id*nt UtaiOT - Recaption f«w 7.5 paraens 
S&ade&C 8hle& * &«c«ptioa'fer CImmi of 1961 
lord Miiwrg - 6 dinners fes: 3«p.«&ca« visitors 
Sfc««l*r&fc IfeaioB - 6 I«sckpo&s - $pm@t® 
Mifceb*ll &©idy Studi« ~ 24 prlats for Pr«*ld«at M&tte 

Lo«rd Jeff«ry In® - sco« for gM&t ©f Bnlvarsity - 

Mr, E. G„ Hilliwwon 
Studttnt Union - T«« for Advl«ory Couafiil of Vomo 

Studft&t Utaieo - ftaception fesr Mr*,, Furcolo 
Dnivftffftifcy Coaaoona - ftunehftoa « Budges €^::udZl®® 
Ufe£v«r*l£y Cmmmi® - coekia© for Pr«ftld«a*-''* 
Kteepeien f«r frssbsss. 

Rob**rfcff Flewftjr* - flows* f«r Kir, ?&a H*£«r 
Sfftdttat 0nion - 7 Z*uteh.MMM, for gu««ta frost Central 

Michigan Collftga 
Btnlltca 1. gmiftll - S00 cepi«« "A Collage Towa In 

M&m 8ngl«nd" 
B*m :oa THCA - sosa far M««t:iag of Advi*Q]C7 of Wan«n 
lord J«ff«ry Ian - 2«acb*oa f»« Oqjniood «ad party 
Studaat Ualoa - »upplia« £©# ^,» IdaaC ■ » Slacaptiaat 

- »*jrd C, Crosrlsy - Surahs®. Ft is* 
Jn&Ze Gimiao •« Burtalutt Frlx* 
&okftsrt» f?l<mmr® - gng*l*i«ng S«i?vlc« 



§14 


,20 


12 


„04 


a 


.47 


3 


,■84 


4 


>2w 


2\ W' 


.75 




,70 




,43 


11 < 


.70 


as. 


00 


9, 




a48> 


32 


7 .. 


50 


** ,-. 


m 



13, .50 
20,00 

. 14 
8 = 47 



50.00 

4.. 
15. 00 






Tot:«l 



|4i4 3 i; 



F., i. 2«ad 



500 ,. 



opi*« ' J M-&««fc - A Collet* Xowa in K«w Eaglund" 



$35,00 
50,00 



Tot ml 



185.00 



ixat® f 
for fch» period July i, 1957 - Juasa 30, 1958 page, 



irilll«n S®»aioas» 



Student Union - 8 luncheons* * gua«t® $13 .,92 

University Cosmos - 8 JUmefooon* - ®uast» 7„60 

Stud&at Union - 6 Luncheon® - Director* of Hw Engisnd 10,44 



Roberts Flower® - £low*r» for fun©r&l of M&rtin J, iteiltoa 12*93 
Hot®.! Stafcli&r - 3 lUracfeaon* « Trust**** Mating IS ,91 

Student Union ~ 10 luncheon* - D®«n« of Hw England 20 .,00 

Association Of C©ll©g«i8 

Ho lo Heyell ~ 1 Multilitn plat® for ujs© of tfe® . 4o75 

Pra»id«nt 

Student Stolon - 9 Lunct&aon© - Provost .sad gu®st® 
Hr»-> Ulrica Cr©!s«®#n - pssfcjagse on invitations for 

Pr©sidftat ? « Chrifcfcaajas Psrfcy 
Spaulding Mosss Company - B^.lanc® "Stoatwr Plan" invoice* 
Rob&rfc* F Lobars * fealaa«?« of inwic© 
Trsvfil S2pan*«a - Robert Bo Haywood to% iafcarvi®!* 
IsOtd Jaffary ™ ©spaoseu for Mr. Tfegl.n « JSajgina&r c.«ulld*,ti« 
University Cession* -» 8 dos, doughnut for Gr&duafcs* 

Scfoocl guests 
EJ^s B&rtl^tfc & Browi - toil calls* 
Unl^arsity Cc^aca® ■- 8 dinner* » gusst$ 



Total $216,60 



3.8 


; 99 


20 


.31 


31 


,43 




,77 


19 


,80 


18 


,47 


3 


,60 


■? 
<& 


o75 


12 


,00 



Wi !.?.!«» 5-lb,«s«ler 



•."^iw gf ■< *<»» '«■ W'M— 3a m 



Student Union - 2 din&«® - Haw Eng^&ad 'Land -Grant $ 3,44 

C<)ll*gA M©*3tir;g 

Stud&at Uuioa « 12 dtnnar® ~ P.4<sn Aaarican Waa&attd 17 

{Lobar &* Flosf®r« - flo^ar* for Hri. HlLlls® Dw.i£ht ? a funaral 15 ..00 

Judd Ps.per Co - 1,500 env«iop®» and cards to satcfo. 

Studaat Union ~ 75 luncfo.aon;* for mm faculty 

Studaat Union * 5 luaofe@ona - guaata 

Px, Barnaby IC@e0.sy - Expels®* for Convocation Addre,e# 

Student felon -* Seiaaca Fssir Cansffiifct*® - Dr.. Donald ftoahor 

Student Union - ? luacfoaoaa} guaata 

Student Union - 9 luncheon* - gua^ta 

Signs® XI Lectur® $ari&a 

Roberts* Fl war* - flower* for fun&ral aarvica 

Hamilton* Vewell - 1GQ0 latfcei for Advisory CquxmbII 

v£ Uoman 
tfaiyaralty CosMcii* - 41 dioBu&r:@ for ?faitt«n''« i&dviaory Council 6I<,5® 

Travel ex&aaaas for Robart E., Haywood for iat«rvi<iw 110,00 

Student Ualon -■ oofffea jn4 dottghtstatis for 1?« gu©»t.« 3o25 

Studied t Union - 4 neglji for Tru»teefl 5«10 



29. 


70 


114 


,75 


8 


,60 


25 


,00 


10 


,00 


16. 


.15 


15 


,28 


50 


,00 




■30 




.00 



Tot®! 5520.20 

total Olnbur«eB8at0 - U&iractrlctftd Sadowsaaiat Funds $1^236.27 



3.95-8 



UHIVERSITf OF MASSACHUSETTS 

0i$bureeaft©nt& - Uuraatricted Trust Fund® for Currant Purpoei 
for the period July l t 1957 - Jun» 30 , 1958 



Gaaera.1l Electric Fund 



Spragw* Fund 



E, X. Hawaii - 75 posters $£0,00 

Ely, Bartlefct and grow, - telephone) toll charge* 67, .41 

J. Paul Mather ° expanse® to ftfa»hing£ou s D (g, to confer 42,02; 

with Asb&esador froea Bresll 

Hotel St&tlar - 3 dinner® for Truetae* Heating a1„15 

Olenond Stjasp Work* - 1 braise plat© for gift in aaessory 3»00 

of Prof , Qmmi 

Hotel Statler - 3 dinger* for Tru»taee Meeting 18,00 

Student Union - 9 luncheons -» Fa© ito«ie«n Meeting 1**78 

Studant Union - 3S dinner p - P«m American. Meeting 69-92 

Dap to H&tloEU&X Defense - Canada ~ print* 3^05 

Gorh«© Company <* tablet for An laws 1 Bi/Beas® Building 35,21 

Student Union * II dinner* for Politi««l Science Heating £3,10 

Hotel Sfcetlar m 3 luncheon© * Trustee* Meeting IS ,95 

Student Uai©» - 11 lunch* ©a* - 12®%?® Office Open Eoue® 4.>95 

Dr. Gwendolyn. Carter - balance on invoice „17 

Lord Jaffery - balaoce of inYoic© for Haywood & paarty $»18 



Total Dlebwreesaente - General Electric Fund $341,89 



Speulding Mo« C©o - 1000 copies ,, Ma*t«r Plan" $1,285.00 

Hotel Statler - 3 luncheon* - Tru*>C:.®«a£ Meeting 18.fl 

Lord Jeffary - luncheon ** Hall Michol* end party' 17 u 43 

Harold A, Ey«n^ Florist - Or, Van Mat as? flcwajrs X0 ,.00 

Stewards Club - Foreign Student Reception 56 ,,66 

Student Union - 30 luncheon* * gue*t* $0 o 40 

Student Union - 8 luncheon® - Asaec, Industrie** 3,6 80 

Student Union » 10 Luncheon* •• 0r o McCune & gua*t* 1*.„10 

Student Union *■ 5 luncheon* •=> Society for Promotion ©f 11 ,2.0 

Agriculture 

Student Union - Reception for 105 persons £i 3 0Q 

Student Union » Ra-cepiion for 118 par««n* 23 a 60 

Student Onion - 29 neele • Public Health Dedication 43.50 

Student Union <*< 12 Luncheon® « Dr. McCune &n.d gue*t* £0»88 

University Steward* Club •* President * * Reception 5.63-10 

Expanse* of Harry S„ Hugill for intenri^aw a® candidate 141=,. 44 

for Engineer 

Dr Gwendolyn Carter - Lecture *4-,S3 

Student Union - 7 luncheon* - Meeting with Tom Col ton 8, ,47 

Tetel Diabureenentfi - Spragu* Fund $2, 035., 35 



Disburaesaaata • Unr as trie tad truat Fw»rads» for Curraafc Purposas 

for the parted Jmiy 1, 1957 - Juo« 30 , 1958 - Pag® 2 



University Fu&d 



5twde»t Uuioa - 28 luaafcaona - Coafaraaeas of $ 35K76 

Jwaior Collag® Prasidaats *ad Director® 

Studant Uaioa - Gu* Perflt© 1 * B.aad for 100,00 

Stacaption p 12/14/57 

Sharaton-RLiiibali Hot®! - ros® for Robert Eo H^ysfo«id 9.85 

Basfcosaara Club - parfciaH co®t of club program 2G a ®0 

Studaat Bnioa " rafraabaaatfi for ?§«?«*& Office guaatg 4„0Q 

Sfcatlar-SMLXton - 3 laucb.a.a •- Tns®£®«@ Maatinga 18,91 

Studaat: Ua.ioa ~ t<sa 6 S5 

Lord 3@t£i®TCj Tan - gaasfcs - lafcara-sst tonal Wea&aad 44,27 

Ao J, Hast lags - swppiia® for Prasidaat^s %„5Q 

Christinas Party 
Roberts Plos?ars - f lobars for Trwstaa Eoutia's fuaaral 15.44 

Sm.p Coaf^xaaca - stwdaat aspaaaas J, 00, 00 

Statist -Hiltoa Ketal - 3 L«a«a«©a® - Truataaa 18,9.1 

Heating 

Robert® Flowara - Prof., Ooraa'® sari? tea 15o00 

Tfe,® Z*©rd Jaffary ** 4 lunchaana - Ragtoaal Stat* l^ c 69 

University Pr#s« 

E&acutiv® St awards and C&tar«rs Assoc* - Honor 12*631! 

X«a Id Dialog Cessions 

a. Lo & a Pri&a - 4 luacfeaoass •»•• D««a Har^ton &sid 3,00 



Stndaafc Union Po©d Sarvica - Military iuac&aon 5ol 

Studant Onion Food SeK^tcm -13 dianars - 0®an 27,20 

I£tr»»«a «nd guaata 

Studant Union Food Sarvic® - 11 dioraar® for gw*s#t£ 39,75 

Unlvar^ity Ccssaona - 50 lunch&ons - CosasamcaBsaat £Q<,00 

71 



Total $ 51© o 03 



1. 



Appot atEsests 



CUS®H^ & $©arg® W« 6 Instructor in deelogj (fc tinsa) (leaching M$©ei&ta) s 
effactiva Sapt*^®^ 1* W5B at $1,079 pa? yaas, Baeholos's da$saa* 8ro*» 
tfoivassityi 193? * and ©a® ya&s" of gsaduata scu^ at uaivsss&ty o£ Mas»* 

cfousatts vlth superior D©c@rd<.. 

BSHHIS* Hilliss* Sw , Xastsuefeos la Fr<mela (3/4 tins) (Caroar tastsuetos) * 
affastlvs Saptoiabas 1* 1958 at $3»^37 pas yaas. &.B. Barsasd, A.M. Boston 

Ifoivassity. Taught at Jffl&arsoa Seta®©! fas Soy® 1946-47 5 C©l©J»r©©k Jcadsssy 
1947*48; Chicago totfe School 1948-49; @®sta Si§& gcts©©l 3 Sfegtsick* Ited© 
Island 1949-54; gi^i School* Hilton* Mass* 1934*53; Siaplswood High School* 
HBpta©©d 9 M.J. 1955 to data. 

GaPXIiLXSfr Mario S. , Bsisfeructor la History (3/4 tins) (Castas Instructor) * 
©i£®cti¥© Sep&tste? 1,, I9SB at $S 9 23? pas y@&r« B.&. and M.A. ttkiusssity 
of Ciaic&g©, Taught at tfest Philadelphia High Sctail spri&sg of 1955 and 
is psassntly washing on Ms ?h.D. at Yul® ttdtoasslty. 

mmmm$ Arthur B.» Instructor n £k'\ Agricultural gcoao&ilcs (% time}* 
affaetlva f©pt®sb« 2, 1958 at $2,535 p®s yaas. BoS. in Agricultural 
Englna&siag-f'assi Bsmgwaatg, Wast ¥lrg£ni& @ai*$sslty * 1958. Mr. Qsaghasty 

has &&ea acc^pt^d a© a ggaimsta @tad3aat 8 Unlvasslty of Bass&c&usg®tt@» 
$®ptmbm: 1958. 

DB&DISO, Evalyn* SMtTmcte'r In Cle@i.©gy ft tiaa) (Tasahlag Aasociata)* 
sffaetiva g@§*teil&as 1* 1958 at $1*079 pas yaas. Sacalwad tecfe^los's 
d©gr€© fsosa Ctaivessity ©£ ?o&asyl?aaia June 1958. 

OTFH 8 Joan H. , Bis trustor "A M In SOsticultuss (% ti»a)i affaetlva 

Jisa® 8 1958 at $2 9 5S5 g«s y@&r„ i.S* Univas&ity ©£ Mcssachusatts i95S« 
Fsasoatly aasollad in the Qsaduata Set*©©! at tte Oalvassity of Massaahusatts. 

8QB6IM* Har©!d C. 9 Goafassaca Cacsdlnatos* Stofast Hat©s Building* Srad© 14 tf 

affactiva J^ly 7 9 I9SS afe |5 @ 07@ p©r y@ms. Ftafeli© E®l®ti©TO^ B©stlsf£@id 
toa 1945*47; ^ssistent Masssg^f^ Ke«^r© l»tal 9 Bc^ssou^ Mesa. 1947*49; 
As8s£^tma£ Maaasart F. €« J<»©©© & Co. * Sprias£I<--d, |fes^ 1949-53; Eaiaag^s^ 
B©^l@is i.@st©5ar^^t & ishieli is n mm±t®K of efca SsGebaasa Buffae oat of Elov 
York 1954 to data. 

F£SZ<SgB&£D, Sto^ lastsuetos iia Geology C% tis») (fssacaiisg isB@ociat@) 9 

©ff^cti^a S^t^^^s £ 195B a& $1*079 pas yaas. R®^@i^©d feaetelos'© «l^saa 
fsoa SMivassity at Msis^ Jsnan 1958. 

FE?1 9 €feasl®s 1. 1 Instructor in ®ml®g$ f% ftisas) C^aashiag Associate) 9 

a£f®3ti%»a Ss^t^ss 1, 1958 at $1*079 pas yaas. Bachelor 8 s d©gsaa fsosa 
^Bivassity of Ban Mm$®fa$>s©% F®bn»sy 195®. Bm mm sasaastes of gsaduata 
atu<|y at this Utei^@s©ity with a supasias sf^©oir«i. j 



GW®m p llisabath Su 9 lastsaetos in fhyslcal Idueattea for ©osasa, cf facti^a 
S^t@si>®s 1 B 195S at $4*316 pas y©&r. B.C.* P©s^asylvaai& State Uaivassity 
1955 5 will r®c@ii?@ M.S. fro© Siniwssity of Illinois at aad of 1958 sisasBsss 
sassioac las ^Iso atudiad ©as Sftsaasjsr ia Suad^a* Has taught two yaass la 
tha Scotl@ad School fas Tatosaa's dfeilds^a* Scotland* Vannsylvania. and two 
yaasa a© asa assistsat C% tiss@> at tha $ai , $'©r&kty of Illinois. Taa^osasy 
appoiats^at for oa@ yeas to sr@pl®c© Mis© E@id ^ls© is ©a l<®&s?f» of afes^aca. 



2. 
(coattoued) 



laPlAHZB, ttasritt @» , Xa&tttuetor "A" to A&ff£eul&u?ai Scoaoaies (% ttoe}® 

s££©ctiva S©p£a£sbar ^^ 1959 at #2,535 p®r year, B.S. HJoivaffsity of 
Hassaebuaatts 1953. £tas feaan accepted a® gsraduata etudaat at Oalvaraity 
©£ Kasaacliusatta to Septooba? 1958. 

MiQOCSIs, Jobs* C. 9 Xaateuatav "A" to Agxrioultasal f€on«las (% ttoa), 
e££oatlva July I, 1953 at $2*535 p®% year, &.B.A. , nalvasaity ©£ Stesa- 
ehusatta 1957. Pffosaatiy aarallod la tha Graduate gsbool at tba OWL- 
nity of Maasaebuaatta. 



O'HEXL, aaaial C, Instructor in G®ro8aa # af£«et£va Saptaofear 1, 1958 at 
§4 9 3I6 pa? yaar« B«A. Coraall Univaraity 1938 , and la at prosant aaoeplet- 
lag lis 2h*D. In tesaa at Gosnall. Spaat al« yoass to Gsraamisy (1946*52) as 
aa totorpratoar sad tes^ Sdneatioa Adviaer, fitst with ©S&FE aa«3 tboa to 

Civil S&rviea atta&lfc&l to tba Bssparwat of tba te^« 1954*58 baa boon a 
graduata t@as&tog laa&totaat at Goraail Itoiwrsity tasditog both tm^sm and 
laaguaga laboratory aoatioas. la 1® prapesred to tmt&h. botb l£t@r&tur® ana 
philolo^ to addition to alaoastaKy asd latarsssdlata ©armss* 

POT, il*avid & anstrtsstor "A 9 * to Forestry as*4 f91ldli£a mmgmmkt (% tint), 
©ffaati^a July 1, &95S at $2,535 par yeas* B.S. Slaiveraity of tfaaaaeliusatto 

1958. ®aa feaaa aeeaptad a® gra^ksat© ©tei@s&£ at Hai^araifcy o£ Ste©aabu@©tt@ 
la SaptQB&ar 1958* 

SEISMIS^ George, laa&ruefcer la Mattaatta C^/- 1 ttoe) e££<i£!tiw 
Saptas&er 1, 195H &t $1,438. 6$ pas? year. B.2S. Beaten University, 1953* 

Presently @ar©lI<B^ in tba feada&t® Scbooi at tba University @£ ^©SJse!ss@attSc 

VCtiBm.s Stobard Si*, Isssttraetor "A" to Fwd Teebaology (% time), effective 
July 1, 19 5S (Ffeosaa Food extract #12*05*300*27) at |2»53S par year<, B.S., 
University of BSasaaebusQtts 1951; M.S. Qtol^wraity of Saw Hanpablre 1956. 

Research associate, Braivtroity @£ Best Baa^abisa for one y@ar £©lim*tog M.S. 
Stose $@g»t€sls@r 1957 baa boaa enrolled m m gp»daat@ atudaat, Balvasraity 
of Haaaaebuaatte mj^klEig tsward a Pli*9* to F®^cl Teelsa©io^y» 

¥2S^M S Frassis B. 4 > Insit^^toE 4 i^ Betaay (1/3 tiae) (Saasliias 4saoaiat@)» 
affaati^a m$&m$m? l a 195S at $1^43^.66 par ymir, E«S Uaivasalty of 
SSasaaahusatta 1957*. lias asaistad in fmw^mm totaay and baa tei raaaasah 
at tiba OtdLvaxeity ©£ Hesaaobuaatta. 

B^T^ Gllbast V« » i^sistsat Fs©£aas®f o£ Sleetadueal aostoaartos, affaetiva 

S^tSE^g' I, 195© -m $6,474 ^@^ y®as C^^«®sia)« S^B. aad S.M. Ifasaae&uaatta 
Xastituta of Taebaialc^y. lioskad is todastcy si® autoqsatla ssiaalla tasting 
a^uipK^atg aaalesua ecaqMitear €^ap©nsi2i&a and rasaassab and d@¥al^sa@nt to 

solid ultsmzmic d#Mj- lin@a 9 1952-56s 3aeehtog MmUtm.t at KLI.T. 1956 to 
data» 



3. 

A^oin Ssssants Above Misslimiaa (conti nued) 

BfflBBS, Evelyn M. * instructor "A" in Public Hoalth Starsing, effective 
Septeabar 1, 195H at |5 a S3® per yoOT" (2 ©top® ataro miniBusi). B.S. and 

H.S. Simmm Colieg®. fviinto Duty Husrse 1933-36; toaeral tety $urs@ s 
Boston City Eosptfcml 1936-3B; Fohlic Health Staff itese, Hertford ¥isit- 

£& Slurs® Association 1939-41; Pufclio H©aith Epidemiologist, Burba&k 
Bospifcai, Fitehburg & H&ss. 1941-43; Clinic Esocutive* Hassaehusette 
gfeiesriel Eespitol 1941*49; Public Health Utes&aig Supervisor, Eiassaffihu©et£& 
BepartHont of Public Bsal&h 1949 to date. 

GAmiCSC, Sareld ft. , toociafc® Frofeissor M A" of Forestry end Ulldlif© 

Hamgaffiufe (in liasa of gro£®®s©r M A M > effective Sdpt@sts@r 1, 195® at $a,060 
poff year (4 step® afeoi?>g ssiaisM®)*, H,S. » S$.8» & g&.JB. » College of For@&try 8 
State University of Hasp York* gy£a@&s® s Nov York* Ens feson taslsteat Pr©» 
gessos* at Syracuse aad has b@en on tho staff %M%® s£k@ 1952. la© had 
too yo&rs 8 SKporiem©© is ini^stry &»d <£®a@ul.£i©|| vorfc ohich glvos hfa a 
isall«r©u&d©d background for hia position. 

BEXD, John L. , Professor *!A M of Food Zeohaelegy, off active July 1, 1958 at 
$8,736 (3 steps ulso^e eliiinuB) (Frosen Pood Contract #i2~05~3$O-27><> E.g. 
fesrge liasbiagtea University 1923. teployed by tho Bura« of Standards and 
tho Halted States Separtnsnt of Agriculture for a period of approBlnatoly 

ton y@ara» 1921-31. Fee® 1930-1940 w Cte£#t in cl&arga of tho U.S. P. A* 
Fruit & Vegetable %m@m®h Laboratory,, MOslaeOg. ^asas. Employed fey United 
$tat@s H&partss&nt of Agriculture in &i&r!J&s iostetry in hoth California 
and Florida until 1943. Xa 1943 fea b®gCT0 Director of to»i&r©k & Bowoloo- 
osat, Florida CI try® Comoro Cooperative* Eo r«ained thoro until 1950 
wfam ho bemmm 0©»raiL Bteag@r of tli@ Golden Citrus Juices, Ins. Fro® then 
until 1 955 ho had a ©iaseo@©ioKi of rm^mmibl® fosition^ with tho »s?® J^i®@ 
Cos^any of Chicago; T^scsksissal Editor of Foo4 frocoestog »gaslno, Cfoteago; 
foshsical Diroetor of tho High C Division of ?te» Crop; and Consul taat 
for else indiasi Ei^f^r Citsus Iisagy®» Sineo 19 SS !ia ha® baoa Editor of tho 
Heat©ra Cass€^ &nd Psek®r 9 a ^?©s?y i^ortaat iragasino for tho ©stonsiw 
l»r«c€@@is^§ iad?sstry of, tho tmstern part of tho Dnitod Statos. 

EiM^ Edgar B» » lastruetor in tetlt®Mti€8 8 of^oetivo Sopt^is^r l 9 195S at 

$5 S 356 (5 stops ahoipe w&tdmsm). B.g« s Qtsoons '-Collogo» Brooklyn* 1952; 
H. S. Urns Yask Onivoraity 1954. &pis©ts m cc^l^to all ra«|isir®s^nfes for 
Hj.©« 4sgr©o in tian to bo a^r^<i in Ogtols®r 195S« So ha© had turn yoar® 
of in&satrial m$mi»mm a® senior s»tli®^ti€ian in & thoorotlosl phyaios 
group and b®o yoar® 6 €^poris®e@ a® a res^sirsh ©ssi^teat at Eioo York 
Univorsity. 

MDSHE&, Harold E. s Assosioto Professor "A" of E®pti©ult«r® (i& lim of 
frofesaor "A") of footle August 1„ 195S at $7,74S step® abswo ©inirn®). 
3.S. in landsoapo Arehitostura, md.v®gBtfc$ of Hassaahusott® 1942; I.S.A. 
University of Mssssehusosto 1947; M.L.A. University of Massaehusotts 1957. 

H# has boon suoeesslvoly Instruotor (1950-52) and Assistant Profossor 
(1952 to data) of lortioulturo at tho mimmity ©f Missouri. Fro® 1947 to 
1950 ho ^a® Sup@rintsn.d@at of Osmunds 9 Lask® Placid Club & H^ Tosk» 



mJia&lH* Joan M. , Instructor "A" in Maternity Nursing, affective 

Sts$>t©a£mr 21, 1958 at $5,772 per year (3 steps aSHjfve GriLnitBUQ). B.S. 
St, Joseph's College School of luraiag; M.A* Colussfeia. Steff Rur&e, 
St. Frances &>spitai 1951-52; Maternity ^£9&&g< Supervisor, Eom&Vk 
Hospital School of Husein? 1952-S3; Instructor, Fost*Graduate Frograv, 
Boston Lying~In S «pi«al 1954- S5; Instructor, S&atemity Cursing, Boston 
College School of Bursing 1956 (% y©ar); Instructor, f-tetsm&fey Bussing, 
St. Joseph Collage Ssfeool of fer@isi@ 1958 te data* 



FA0LIHX, Silberto, lbs trustor in Isfeanee languages, effective S«*pt^fs&&r 1, 

1958 at $5,356 per year ■ (5 -step© above s&satasa). Diplona "Classical 
Katurity" fro© Uceo "D.GotugBo", Aeuila, Italy, 1949. B.A. University of 

Buffalo, 1957 and will shortly receive hi$ M»A. fro® the University of 
Buffalo. H© ana taught at the university of 'Buffalo, Eosary Hill College 
and public school© of Buffalo, Hew York frosa 1956 to June 1958c Stoesi ' 
October 1952 to October 1954 h® taught for the U. S. Arssy. Teiape-rary 
eppointusijat while- Hiss &ina Tilloaa is on leave without fay to cof&plet© 
her Ifc.L 

SC&XBA, Christoph J*-, Assistant Professor of M&themtlca 9 effective 
Septoober 1 # 1958 at '$5,772 per ye@r (3 steps abov® mlnizmm)* Boctorafc© 
Degree froa the University of Sicsea, Oemeay (Br.lsr.13at.} 1957, as well 
as the equivalent of m Blaster 8 © degree froaa the save® school In 1955. Froa 
March 1955 to August 1957 he held a position of "Schreihpraf t und 
lilfasstetent' 1 at the "SGnteBStlscke Institut dor Uebig-univarsitaet" e 
®imtm 9 Germany, during this past year he- lias &&m teaching and doing 
irch work at the Obivassity of Kentucky* 



WW $ F. Udgely, Jr. , Instructor "A" in Agricultural Seeoeaics, effcetivs 

August 3, 19 Si at #6,006 per year (4 steps shove ad-aissusa). B.S. University 
of Maryland 1952. Is has had as tensive essperieaee in fruit and vegetable 

marketing in a practical sasnn@r sine© he served as sales nsnager on a 315 
acre vegetable fans in Maryland for a tws»yeer period immediately following 
graduation from ee&lag©. In addition he has had too susasars of «%^eri^ 
in the wliolesslo fruit and vegetable business in tshlch both fresh and 
frosen fruit and vegetables wsr© handled. 



TXBBBHEULp K&ehard M. 9 Instructor in Mechanical I8iginaering 9 effective 
September 1, 19SS at $5,564 per year fsttslaua). MLS. Stevens Institute of 

technology 1952.. Bs received Ms M.S. in Industrial Managemaat June 1958. 
Served as 1st Lt» in USAF at the Air Force Cambridge Eesearch Center. 
June 1954~$spten»v? 1955 he was a ^astingbaase graduate Student trainee , 
largely in the area of industrial engineering. Frosa Septesibar 1955-Jue© 1956 
he ssss a full* tine graduate* student at Bzmmm* From June 1956-SeotsBber 1957 
he was at the Wesfciagl&auss llectronic Tube Mvision, Bath, Stew York. From 
September If 57 - January 1958 he was a graduate assistant as laboratory in- 
structor and half-time graduate student at Stevens. Since February 1, 1958 
he has been an instructor in the itepertneafc of Industrial Bagiaseriag at 
Sti 



5* 



BXACK, tfallase 6. , ftttm Associate S>sr©£a®s©s "A" Baisy & Aaiisal Scia&c© 
t© Pxofeesoic "A" Bsicy & A&tesl Selene©, ®££<getiw Septeabes- 1 9 1958 

at $8,736 (1 oar-it ©tap). 



MX$ 9 Vasrda M. » frcaa Associate Professor "A" Iras Seoasoadc© t© Professes "K" 
ISeoiioiaies, e££eet±aft Oete&©r 1, 1953 ait $9»100 pair year. 



IlB!QSASVZXIg 9 Ir^iisg s frera Tesisnieal Assii$fc<mfe 9 Cranberry 

Station t© Xastruefce-r "A" a Cranberry Statl©a 9 ©££<sseti^e Septaaber 1* 1958 

®t $3 t @7© p@r year* 

FAOB8f» 9 Irviag 8. 9 f toa Associate Profsosoip "A" fteod Teclsaology to 

Professor 88 A ,f Foo«3 Seefctt©iogy 9 ©ffeetlvs Septealier 1 9 1958 at $8,736 per year* 

M^eiSs Pre&eriek J. 9 fs@sa Assistant Professor "A" Fe^i Teetaaology &s 
Associate Professor M A M fb©4 Teekaology* effective Septsaafeer 1 9 1958 at 
$7,436 per year CI merit step). 



€8tlS!3&XElS 9 Julius 8. * £%im Ass&s&mfc Pe©£ ©aser "A 1 * Sairy & Aninal Seiene© 
to Associate Professor M A W Dairy & Miami Science, of fee tiro Oeto&er 1 9 195$ 

at $7*436 par 



mam 



*»*»•» ««w^iata Professor "A" Ebbs leenesaleif to Professor "A 1 
9 effective October 1 1958 At: $9 9 1©Q per year. 



tSOSBSfe 9 Margaret J„ „ fcoa Assistant Professor W A" 4-H &© Associate 

"A n 4-H, effeettvs Jasssary 2, 1959 t© |7,i24 per year (1 «aasdLfe sesp). 



HQs&W, toressee D. 9 £soo Assistant Professor "A" Agricultural Ssaaaeia© 
e© Associate prefesso* "A" Agricultural feosaosBicfa, ©f£@etiw Septes&er 11, 
1958 at: $7,124 per year, 



S00SBBXCS 9 licta 1 © 1 A. , ficon Instructor "A" Agsoaoay &® Assistant 

Agressctsya ©£f actios Septmstar 1, 1958 at $6,435 per 



Professor "A" 



MAM 



8H£§ @ flaltar 8* 9 fros Assistant frofesgsor "A M lortieultur© t© Associate 
Professor M A M Hortisulgasre, ©££cicti¥© S@ptasi*ei? l 9 1958 at $7,748 per 
(1 mtstt stop). 



SDCKBaHIE3 9 Sort Mo, £caa 
Assoaiat© %m£mmz n A n 



S'sofassosf "A"* OKmbassy S^tiaa t© 

Sm&UM 9 ©££©eUve July 1, 1958 at $7*124 



K£SXS 9 ftsaa^t W» 9 0as4 ©£ Bs^aetsmat "A" Agffiaultusra! laginsaring, 
July 8 9 1953 £am |3 9 567 t© $9 9 373 (I sesit ©tap). 

1MS S gal@t©n Bo 9 J?. 9 Ass^tant Pmimms "A 9 * laata^ioiagy, affaati^ 
29 9 1953 fm $6^162 to $6 9 708 <1 narit stop). 



SOJOf 9 Jo IS»OTay 9 Assistant &mfmmw ,f A M misy & Animal Salanaa^ 
a££aetiw July i 9 1958 at #6 & 7CS pas 



6. 
Cgeatiea of Maw Position 

IMEIS, Joha S. fsma Psofeaaor, B&^artosnt of Soveraeents, to Ea&d ®i 
BasgMartmsat ©f govertaasaaat^ effective S®?t®a^®f l t 1958 at $& & 736 per year. 
B.S. University of Eieiaaoad 1939; H.A. Golleg® of Millie® & Mffiry 1941; 
M.S. Qyrseuee Haivers&ty 1942; Fa.©. ISaivereity of Chicago 1951, H© las© 
b@m at the University ©s frofessor of SfevensiBaat since Septessber 1, 1956. 

HXSD3CK* Areas' £. * F^ofe&ser of Speech, to Head of B®p©r£ss©a£ of Speech 8 
effective S@pt@s&®? I, 1958 at $9*100 per year. B.S. 2£tes<& College 1930; 
M.A. Cornell SJaiveruity 1943. He to bom at the Btoiversi ty sissee 
Septeueer 1, 194? . 1-© wp fleet appelated n& M@istssat Pr®f&®TOr of 
Speech* pwtsmt®& to Associate Fttofeeeer of Speech, Septera&er 1* 1949; 
Frofegsor of Sp®sslj 3 Ss^teisber 1, X9S4 B 

transfer of ^ peiataaBnt 



, Bsinrich fsea Instructor "A" Deizy & ^ssisgel Scioto (Hood Amd) 

to Instructor "A" Miry Us Ante©! Science,- State Funds* effeetiv® 
July~i 9 I93B et #5,538 per year. 

Chang e la gtetu@ 

EICS 8 Mrs. Lesiee 2. from tatrwetof la Itettasitics {% tiee) to Instructor 
la Methenatlcs (full tlaa) effective Septes&er 1» 1958 et $5,148 pear yeer„ 

Mrs. Etas has ta et §&® University a© instructor la Matfe«&t&es (% tlae) 
since Septesber 1, 1953. 

flcbeol H^lo ygBsat 

Ee replace Professor Arthur 2. Hi@d€ck 9 ,3pp&sved oy the loard of Trustees 

oa Hay 31, 1958. 

X.o* Annual Weekly Sros© 
IMS ^M_ £*£•<, 



MICE, Bsnry B. test, Prof • 9 %©ech 100 $5538 $138.45 $830.70 



June 23-July II, 1958 
Add % of Annual Sleekly ©rose 



•• .,tS^«5m£»bifiek 

PAmMQH, I&berfe K. Assoc. Frof.* Meeho^nr. 100 $6240 $156.00 f4£8.0© 

Chaa&e of Tlae in Sua&iaiar School JSaployBsaat 



§K&SOTH85f , Herj 9 A©©@ei&t@ Srofessor of Cursing, ^^^ 3®®® 20-J«ly 3, 1958 
to June 38«July 11, 1958* .lb* June 20«July J 8 1958 dates had previously 
feeen approved bj tbs geerd of Xcueteee oa May 31, 1958. Her 
is $147.22 per 



Bgserltu jg 



AlBtsma, George V. , frofessor of fhysies, Wmsttw, effective ^ay 31, 1958. 
Br. Aldessiaa kad oia^a et the Paiversity sisi^e Sept«si^ef 21, 1921. 



BXCKZHSC®!, SiS^ceaee 3., Fcefeeeer ®M Agree tolofgrj,- Bseritos 9 effective 
4ttguet 31, 1958. Mr. Bickia@oa hats beea et the Oteiveriiity slacev Jeauary 2, 
1913. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
September 9, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bart let t presiding 



PRESEN T : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Brown, Miss Buxton, Yashin, Haigis, 
Kiernan, McDermott, McNamara, Miss 
Schuok ^aber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Provost McCune, Treasurer 
Johnson, Dr. Salwak 

On invitation of Chairman Bartlett, Dr. Shannon McCune. 
Provost of the University, and Dr. Stanley Salwak, Assistant to the 
Provost, were invited to join the meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett read a letter from James W. Burke 

dated September 5, 1958 in which he tendered his resignation as 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees and Secretary of the University 

of Massachusetts effective as of the close of business October 31, 

1958. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: m o accept the resignation of James W. Burke 
as Secretary of the Board of Trustees 
effective immediately. 

On recommendation of Chairman Bartlett and motion duly 

mad« ^.nd second- d, it was 

VOTED : ^o lect Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of 

the University, as Secretary pro tern of the 
rd of Trustees until such time as a new 
Secretary may be elected by the Board 

Dr. Boyden, Chairman of the Trustee Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, reported that his committee had met and made 

a careful and detailed examination of the appointments and course 

of study changes as recommended by the President, and after 

discussion and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 



2017 



James W. Burke 



resignation 



Kenneth W. 
Johnson - 
Secretary 
pro tem 



M 



Personnel 
Act ions 



TRUSTEE 



New 
Courses 



Landscape 
Architecture 



New 
Courses 



Poultry 
Science 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions, 
merit increases and other personnel 
actions included in the list entitled 
Schedule A, which is attached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minuter - . 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the ne T7 courses as contained in 

Schedule B attached to these minutes which 
is hereby made a part of these, minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the revised curriculum in Land 
scape Architecture as contained in 
Schedule C which " tached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes . 

It was 

VOTED : To adopt the new courses in the Graduate 
School as contained in Schedule D of 
these minutes which is hereby made a part 
of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTE D : To adopt the Ph.D. program in Poultry 
Science as part of the Graduate School 
offerings of the University as contained 
in Schedule E of these minutes which is 
hereby made part of these minutes. 

Trustee Whitmore reported on the all-day meeting of the 
Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds that took place at the 
University on July 18, 1958. He stated that at that time his 
committee made a detailed examination of plans and specifications 
that were presented at the meeting and also made a thorough in- 
spection of the newly completed Public Health Building. The 
committee awarded a contract, with prior approval of the full 
Board, for the Grading and Improvement of Physical Education Play- 
ing Fields to the Eastern Tree and Landscaping Corporation of Dedham 



I 



TRUSTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the low bidder, in an amount of $150,123.81. President Mather and 
T reasurer Johnson made brief statements on the status of the buil A ~ 
ihg program explaining that all state appropriations for con- 
struction would be totally committed with the awarding of the con- 
tract for the ROTC building on which bids are being received on 
September 19, 1958. Plans and specifications are now being pre- 
pared on additional buildings that will cost in excess of 
$8,000,000 which are included for appropriation in the recommenda- 
tions of Governor Furcolo in his capital outlay program that is 
now before the Legislature. In these recommendations, the Governor 
has asked that the five-year capital outlay program of the Univer- 
sity be accelerated to three years and that $12,186,000 be appro- 
priated for this purpose this year. 

On recommendation of Trustee Whitmore and motion duly 
made and seconded, it was_ 

VOTED : To approve the following preliminary plans: 

U-57-1 Science Center - third section, Desmond , 
& Lord, architect, approved subject to 
minor changes. 

U-58-4 Infirmary - Thomas A. Kirley, architect. 

'J-59-1 Dining Commons Addition - Kilhara, Hopkins, 
Greeley & Brodie, architect. 

U-58-5 Engineering Shops - John Guarino, architect. 

t t -58-6 Cold Storage Building - S. S. Eisenberg, 
architect. 

Dormitories - #16 and #17 for women including 
their location opposite Leach and Crabtree as 
shown on the plans of Louis W. Ross. 

Men's Dormitory group - layouts and design in- 
cluding location west of Kappa Sigma subject 
to minor adjustments for grades - Louis W. 
Ross, architect. 



2019 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



2020 



TRUSTEE 

Engineering 
Campus 



Maintenance 
Building 



Science 
Center 

Steam Lines 



Sewer 



Dormitory #15 



Education 
building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VO TED : To approve th^ 'Vvelopment of the Engineer- 
ing campus with parking areas and other site 
developments within the scope of a general 
plan presented to the meeting. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve final plans for the Maintenance 
Building, U-58-1 as prepared by Maloney & 
Tessier. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the following projects subject to 
completion of certain minor details to the 
satisfaction of the Treasurer. 

1. Public Health Building - U-3pl - 
0. D. Purington Co. 

2. Steam Distribution - Contr. #9 - 
Hartwell Co. , Inc. 

3. Sanitary Sewer, Ftorm Drains, and 
Water Distribution, Contr. #6 - 
Warner Bros. , Inc. 

4. Dormitory #15 - Louis W. Ross, 
architect. 



Trustee Whitmore explained that at the time of their 

meeting the design of the School of Education building as prepared 

by Desmond and Lord, architect, be revised to present a more 

attractive west face of the building. This has now been done and 

presented to members of the committee who have expressed satisfaction 

\\dth it and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOT ED : To approve the revised preliminary plans 
of U-58-2 School of Education building - 
Desmond and Lord, architect. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that Murray D. Lincoln of the 
Class of 1914 requested that the Trustees make a voluntary adjust- 
ment in the Murray D. Lincoln Loan Fund. After discussion and on 
motion duly made and seconded, it was 



1 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the reduction of the principal 
of the Murray D. Lincoln Student Loan Fund 
by a voluntary payment of $1,863.14 to the 
Internal Revenue Service as requested by 
Murray D. Lincoln and paid on August 5, 1958. 

VOTED ; To accept the unrestricted gift of Murray 
D. Lincoln in the amount of $2,000.00 and 
add it to the. principal of the Murray D, 
T incoln Student Loan Fund to be used for 
making loans to needy and deserving students. 

Treasurer Johnson read a letter from Thomas J. Donnelly, 

Director of the State Civil Defense Agency wherein he requested 

permission to have built on University property an underground air 

raid shelter. After discussion and on recommendation of President 

Mather on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To refer the request of the Director of the 
State Civil Defense Agency for permission to 
construct an underground air raid shelter on 
the University campus to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds. 

Trustee Brett stated that the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association, of which he is chairman, had received bids 
for the construction of Women's Dormitories #16 and #17 and for 
two additional faculty-married student apartment buildings #5 and 
#11 and that the counsel of the Building Association, Austin J. 
Broadhurst would present to the Board action for approval the 
land lease and building lease covering these four buildings. 
Mr. Broadhurst presented details of the land lease and the build- 
ing lease and after discussion on motion duly made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : That the form of lease from The Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts to University of Massachusetts 
Building Association of four parcels of land 
for the erection of two apartment buildings 
and two dormitory buildings, all pursuant to 
Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended or 



2021 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Student 
Loan Fund 



Air Raid 
Shelter 



Dormitories 

#16 and #17 



Faculty 
Hous ing 



2022 



TRUSTEE 



Assoc, of 
Governing 
Boards of 
State Uni- 
versities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



supplemented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by 
Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 1958, 
Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by 
Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, by 
Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, by Acts of 1957, 
Chapter 517 and by Acts of 1958, Chapter 456, 
be and hereby is approved as presented to this 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, be and 
hereby are authorized; in the name and on behalf 
of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially in 
the form presented to this meeting, said lease of 
land from the Commonwealth to the Association and 
to cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto, 

yOTED: That the form of lease of two apartment 
buildings and two dormitory buildings, by Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Association to 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts pursuant to 
Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended or 
supplemented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, b; 
Acts of 1946 : Chapter 352, by Acts of 1948 
Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by 
Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, by 
Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, by Acts of 1957, 
Chapter 517, and by Acts of 1958, Chapter 456, 
said buildings to be erected by said Association 
on four parcels of land to be leased to it by the 
Commonwealth, be and her? 1 ^ i~ -^proved as pre- 
sented to this meeting and as to be completed by 
the insertion of the amount of annual rent, not 
to exceed $82,200 in any year, payable thereunder; 
and that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof, be and hereby are 
authorized in the name and on behalf of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts to execute, acknowledge 
and deliver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, and as to be completed by 
the insertion of the amount of annual rent, not to 
exceed $82,200 in any year, payable thereunder, 
said lease of two ppartment buildings and two 
dormitory buildings from said Association to the 
Commonwealth and to cause the common seal of the 
University of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

Trustee Whitmore reported that the Association of 
^erning Boards of State Universities was meeting at Purdue Uni- 
versity on October 15 - 18, 1958. Trustee Taber expressed the 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



desirability of sending several delegates to this meeting and on 

motion duly made and seconded it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman of the Board to 
appoint delegates to attend the Annual 
Meeting of the Association of Governing 
^ards of State Universities to be held at 
Purdue University from October 15 - 18, 1958. 

President Mather stated that Miss Bride E. O'Donnell was 
retiring after having completed fifty years of clerical service in 
the Department of Entomology and on his recommendation the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted: 

"Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University ex- 
press their appreciation of the loyalty and devotion 
to duty of Miss Bride E. O'Donnell during her fifty 
years of clerical service in the Department of 
Entomology and Plant Pathology of the University. 

"In her retirement, she takes with her the gratitude, 
the admiration, and the well wishes of everyone she 
has been associated with during the many years she 
has served the University." 

Chairman Bartlett paid tribute to President Emeritus 

Ralph A. Van Meter in which he was joined by the Trustees and on 

recommendation of President Mather the following resolution was 

adopted: 

"Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts express their sorrow at the death of 
Ralph A. Van Meter, President of the University from 
1948 to 1954. 

"Dr. Van Meter joined the staff of the University in 1917 
as extension specialist in food conservation. In 1923 
he became Professor of Pomology and in 1932 Head of the 
Division of Horticulture. In 1946 he was called upon as 
Acting President during the challenging days of the great, 
post war expansion of the University. 

"Dr. Van Meter's life of dedicated devotion to the Uni- 
versity earned the admiration of all who knew him. 7T is 
warm sympathy for his fellow man, his trueness to 
principle, his fairness, humility, and loyalty were 
qualities indelibly stamped in his character and actions. 



Bride E. 

O'Donnell 

resolution 



Ralph A. 
Van Meter 
resolution 



:024 



TRUSTEE 



Concessions 



University 

Scholarship 

Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"In tribute to Dr. Van Meter's memory we direct that 
this statement be inscribed in the records of the 
Board and that copy be sent to Mrs. Van Meter." 

President Mather recommended that the policy of 
distributing the income from the concessions program derived from 
vending machines located in the dormitories be distributed 
effective July 1, 1958 between the Athletic Trust Funds and the 
University Scholarship Funds thereby eliminating any distribution 
to the Dormitory Social Funds. On the recommendation of the Presi- 
dent and motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That effective July 1, 1958 all income from 

the concessions program located in dormitories 
that was formerly distributed to the Dormitory 
Social Fund be distributed to the University 
Scholarship Fund for unrestricted scholarships 
to be awarded by the University Committee on 
Financial Aid and Scholarships on the basis of 
the following formula: 

57 of the first $10,000 of net profit from 

concessions 
87, of the next *7 000 of net profit from 

concessions 
10% on all profits over $17,000 
with all remaining income to be distribute^ 

to the Athletic Trust Funds. 

President Mather -reported that the fall semester is under- 
way with 5,316 students enrolled. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




pro tem 
Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS Schedule A 

Minutes of Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
September 9, 1958, 12:30 p.m. , Hotel Statler, Boston, Massachusetts 



APPOINTMENTS 



COHEN, Jean Carl, Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, effective September 1, 1958 
at $822.58 for first semester. Ph.D. State University of Iowa. She has 
taught on the staff at Smith College and has taught previously for us. 

D0TT 3 David H. , Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 

effective September 1, 1958 at $1,433.32 per year. A.B. Bowdoin College. 
Presently enrolled as graduate student at the University of Massachusetts. 

DURHAM, George S. , Instructor in Chemistry (% time), effective September 1, 

1958 at $1^91.00 per year. B.S. Reed College, Ph.D. Mew York University. 
He is now an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Smith College and is well 
qualified to assist in our program in physical chemistry. He has been 
with us part time for the last two years and has been a very good teacher. 

FEE, Robert F. , Assistant Football Coach for 3 months, effective August 18, 
1958 to November 18, 1958 at $2,000 for this period, payable weekly. 
B.S. University of Indiana. Played professional football with Chicago 
Cardinals 1956, and coached football and track at Chelsea High School 
1957-58. 

FLETCHER, William A, , Instructor -'A 1 ', Food Technology (% time), effective 

September 1, 1958 at $2,535 per year. B.S. in Chemistry, Bradford Darfee 
Technical Institute. Is attending graduate school at the University of 
Massachusetts and working toward the Ph.D. degree. 

HAWKES, Dennis, Instructor A :: , Agricultural Economics (k time), effective 
September 1, 1958 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Maine. 
Presently employed as County Extension Agent in Agriculture, Bristol 
County doing marketing work. 

HEDLUilD, John D. , Instructor "A"., Agricultural Engineering (% time), effective 
September 1, 1958 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Arizona. Has 
been accepted as a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts 
this fall. 

JARVESOO, Mrs. Aino, Instructor in Home Economics, effective September 1, 1958 
at $4,316 per year. H.S. University of Massachusetts. Assistant of 
Estonian National Museum, Tartu, Estonia; Specialist of Handicrafts at 
Ministry of Economics Affairs, Tallinn, Estonia; production manager of 
handicrafts firm, Tallinn, Estonia; staff writer for "Farmers Weekly"; 
also teacher of arts, crafts, hand-weaving, knitting. 

JOHNSON, Donald J., Assistant Football Coach for 3 months, effective August 18, 
1958 to November 18, 1958 at $1,500 for this period payable weekly. 
B.S. and M.S. University of Massachusetts. Master-Coach, Deerfield 
Academy, 1956-57. 



Schedule A 



2. 



KILKELLEY, Joan D. , Instructor "A", Food Technology (% tine), effective 
September 1, 1958 at $2,535 per year. B.E. Keene, Mew Hampshire 
Teachers College. Taught foods and nutrition at Salem, Mew Hampshire 
Central School 1957-58. Has been accepted as graduate student at Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts for at least two years. 

KIM, Hong Wha, Instructor in Mathematics (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time) , 

effective September 1, 1958 at $1,438.32 per year. B.S. Union College. 
Has been admitted to the University of Massachusetts as a graduate student. 

LAIFE, Michael, Frogram Advisor, Student Union, effective July 20, 1958 at 

$4,316 per year. 3. A. University of Jlew Mexico. While at University of 
Kew Mexico, Mr. Laine did volunteer Student Union work for four years. 

LeGRAND, Donald, Assistant Professor t: A H , Chemistry, effective August 1, 1958 
at $5,889 per year. B.S. Boston University, 1952. Worked at 
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works in St. Louis, Missouri. Has been a graduate 
student at the University for past four years working toward his 
doctorate. He is to be paid from Office of Naval Research - NOER2151. 

MARTIHEAU S Theodore A. , Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds - one year 
appointment effective September 14, 1958 at salary of $6,331 per year 
(minimum salary for the position). B.S. in Civil Engineering, Norwich 
University, 1931. Registered professional engineer in Commonwealth. Life- 
time of building and construction with Martineau and Son, Turners Falls, 
Massachusetts. Since 1945 Business Manager of the firm. 1934-39 Acting 
Town Engineer, Town of Montague. 1939-40 Engineer for J. Slotnik 
Company. 1940-45 U.S. Army - Captain, 3rd Armored Division. 

MIDURA, Thaddeus F. , Instructor "A , Food Technology, effective September 7, 
1958 at $5,0/0 per year. B.S. University of Massachusetts, 1957., He is 
now enrolled in the graduate school at the University where he expects to 
complete his requirements for Master. of Science in September. To be paid 
under Frozen Food Contract #12-05-300-27. 

PAGE, Richard H. , Director of Sports Publicity and Business Manager of 

Athletics, effective August 18, 1958 at $5,460 per year. B.S. Springfield 
College. Has been Assistant to the Director of Athletics and Director of 
Sports Information at Springfield College since September 1950. He is to 
be paid out of Athletic Trust Funds, 

ROTHMAft, Mrs. Eleanor B. , Instructor in Chemistry (% time), effective 

September 1, 1958 at $2,158 per year. B.A. Radcliffe College. Research 
Assistant on an A.E.C. contract at Harvard University, 1953-56. 

SERVADIO, Gildo J., Instructor ! A'% Food Technology (% time), effective 

September 1, 1958 at $2 ? 535 per year. B.S. Tufts College, M.S. University 
of Massachusetts. Has been employed by Pillsbury Mills, Inc. of 
Minneapolis, Minnesota in their research and Development Division. He 
now wants to carry on further graduate work. 

STEVE 5 Peter C, Instructor "A 11 , Entomology and Plant Pathology (J$ time), 

effective September 1, 1958 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Rhode 

Island. Has been enrolled in Graduate School at University of Massa- 
chusetts since September 1956. 












; 






. 



■ 



, , 



• 



. 



." :.■ s 






i 



i 



! 3 • 



Schedule A 3 

STRITT, Albert R. , Instructor "A 11 , Agricultural Engineering (% time), 

effective September V, 1550 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of 
Georgia, 1957. Has been accepted as a graduate student at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. Worked at All is Chalmers Company, Lacrosse, 
Wisconsin since graduation from University of Georgia. 

STR011GREK, Richard L. , Instructor in Speech, effective September 1, 1953 at 
$4,316 per year. 3. A. University of Massachusetts, M.A. Northwestern 
in 1958. 

TROCCHI, Alice, Instructor "A , Poultry Husbandry (% time), effective 

September 1, 1953 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Massachusetts. 
Presently enrolled in Graduate School at the University of Massachusetts. 

TURNER, Everett E. , Jr., Instructor in Chemistry (% time), effective 

September 1, 1958 at $1,07$ per year. B.S. Long Island University; M.A. 
in Teaching, University of Massachusetts. Has been a Teaching Assistant 
in Department of Chemistry at this University. 

WINEY, Fred H. , Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 

effective September 1, 1958 at $1,438.32 per year. A.B. Washington- 
Jefferson College. Is enrolled as a graduate student at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

YOSHIDA, Fumitake, Instructor i? A : , Agronomy (% time), effective September 14, 
1958 at $2,535 per year. B.S. in Agr. University of Tokyo. Presently 
employed by the Section of Chemical Fertilizer, national Institute of 
Agricultural Science, Tokyo, Japan. Accepted as graduate student at 
University of Massachusetts this fall. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

BEEBE, John F. , Instructor in Russian, effective September 1, 1958 at $5,148 
per year ( 4 steps above minimum). B.A. Wabash College, M.A. Indiana 
University, Ph.D. Harvard University. Student teacher at University of 
Indiana spring of 1954; teaching fellow, Harvard University spring of 1958. 

BURAK, George J., Instructor in General Business, effective September 1, 1953 
at $5,148 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S.C. University of Iowa; 
also M.A. University of Iowa. Assistant Accountant, John Laing and Son, 
British Columbia; Sales Representative, Ridout Real Estate, Toronto; 
Auditor, City of Toronto; Instructor in Business and Economics, Univer- 
sity of Maine (1956-58). 

CHAMETZKY, Jules, Instructor in English (Visiting Lecturer), effective 

September 1, 1958 at $5,564 per year (maximum). M.A. and Ph.D. University 
of Minnesota. Has taught five years at University of Minnesota and two 
years at Boston University. 

FIELD, Helen, Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, effective September 1, 1958 at 
$643.50 for the first semester (4 steps above minimum). B.A. Ohio 
Wesleyan University, M.A. Temple University. She has taught our be- 
ginning course for us before and has been very effective in her work. 



Schedule A 4. 

i fa m i ■■■■»—■ nmm — i 

GOZZX, Raymond D. , Instructor in English (Lecturer), effective September I, 
1958 at $5,564 per year (maximum). A.B. Amherst College; M.A. Columbia; 
PluD. New York University. Has several articles published in the learned 
^oumals; seven years of university teaching of English; and has five 
years of successful work in educational relations with the California 
Texas Oil Company, Limited. 

GROVER, Robert H. , Assistant Professor "A", Poultry Husbandry, effective 

October 1, 1958 at $6,162 per year (1 step above minimum). B.S. Univer- 
sity of Vermont. Served three years in the tlavy following graduation from 
college. From 1946 to 1954 he held a position of County Agricultural 
Agent in Somerset County, Maine, and from 1954 to 1956 held a commercial 
position for White's Hatchery, Skowhegan, Maine. Since August 1956 he 
has been County Agricultural Agent in Middlesex County. 

HSU, Joseph, Instructor in Physics, effective September 1, 1958 at $4,/32 per 
year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. Monmouth College. Recitation and 
laboratory instructor in physics at University of Nebraska from 
September 1954 to June 1955; experience in industrial applied physics at 
Pennsylvania State University from September 1956 to liarch 1957. 

JOKES, Phillips R. , Assistant Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 1958 
at $6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. University of Massachu- 
setts, Ph.D. University of Connecticut. Has had teaching experience as 
a high school instructor and also in the U.S. Army's Radiological Warfare 
Branch. Half-time teaching assistant, University of Connecticut, 
September 1954 to February 1956; research assistantship in same department 
from February 1956 to date. 

KR2YST0FIK, Anthony T. , Instructor in Accounting, effective September 1, 1953 
at $4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. American International 
College; C.P.A. Massachusetts. Has been associated with accounting firm 
of Hitchcock and Company of Springfield for past six years and is now a 
senior accountant. 

LEWIS, Margaret 11,, Associate Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 
1958 at $6,703 per year (3 steps above minimum). Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
University in 1937. Since then has had nine years teaching experience 
with University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University, Vassar College, 
Boston University and Haverford College, 

MAWSOH, Joseph C. , Instructor ?J A , Forestry and Wildlife Management, 

effective September 1, 1958 at $5,304 per year (1 step above minimum). 
B.S. University of Maine; M.S. Duke University. Forest Technical 
Assistant of the Duke Forest from January 195/ to June 1958. Title 
recently changed to Superintendent. 

MYERS, Ilancy A., Visiting Lecturer in Psychology (% time for first semester), 
effective September 1, 1958 at $643.50 (4 steps above minimum). Ph.D. 
University of Wisconsin. She will teach course in Child Psychology for 
first semester of school year 1958-59 because of late resignation of 
Dr. Clifford. 



Schedule A 5, 

POPE, Alan M. , Associate Professor of Economics (\ time); effective 

September 1, 1958 at $3,627 per year (5 steps above minimum). o.A. 
Columbia. Has had 2 years of graduate work at Columbia University and 
1 year of graduate work at Bolliol College, Oxford University. Has had 
14 years of teaching experience - his most recent ones being at the 
University of Connecticut and Ohio Wesleyan University. 

van STEE1IBERG, John R. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1958 

at $5,356 per year (5 steps above minimum). M.A. University of Chicago; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. Studied in Finland under a Fulbright Fellow- 
ship from 1956-58. Employed by U.S. Government, 1947 -53; Teaching 
Fellow, Harvard University, 1955-56. 



PROMOTIONS 



ALLEfl, Stephen I. , from Instructor in Mathematics to Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, effective September 1, 195G at $6,006 per year. 

AZPEITIA 5 Alfonso Gil, from Instructor in Mathematics to Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,006 per year. 

BIGELOW, Howard E. „ from Instructor in Dot any to Assistant Professor of 
Dotany, effective September 1, 1958 at $5,0/0 per year. 

BOYER, William W. , from Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering to Associate 
Professor of Civil Engineering, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,708 
per year. 

CLARK, David R. , from Assistant Professor of English to Associate Professor 
of English, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,708 per year. 

CURTIS, Donald, from Instructor in Education to Assistant Professor "A" in 
Audio-Visual Education, effective September 1, 1958 at $5,889 per year. 

GREENBAUM, Louis S. , from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of 
History, effective September 1, 1958 at $5,304 per year. 

HAVEH, Richard, from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor of English, 
effective September 1, 1958 at $5,538 per year. 

HONIGBERG, Bronislaw M. , from Assistant Professor of Zoology to Associate 
Professor of Zoology, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,708 per year. 

KIKG, Gordon S. , from Assistant Professor A", Entomology and Plant Pathology 
to Associate Professor 7 A n , Entomology and Plant Pathology, effective 
September 1, 1958 at $8,060 per year. 

LAESTADIUS > John E. , from Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 
1958 at $6,435 per year. 

LIVINGSTON, Gideon E, , from Assistant Professor of Food Technology to 

Associate Professor : A i! , Food Technology, effective September 1, 1958 
at $7,748 per year. 



. .. 












■ 



i : 



. . 






' 



• 






■ 






- 



Schedule A r 

MacCOMTELL, William P. , Assistant Professor of Forestry & Wildlife Management 
to Associate Irofessor of Forestry & Wildlife Management , effective 
September 1, 1958 at $6,703 per year. 

MAII1ZER, Lewis C. , from Instructor in Government to Assistant Professor of 
Government, effective September 1, 1558 at $5,772 per year. 

M01TER, John, from Instructor in Physiology to Assistant Professor of 
Physiology, effective September 1, 195G at $6,000 per year. 

OGILVIE, Sally A., from Instructor of Physical Education for Women to Assistant 
Professor of Physical Education for Women, effective September 1, 1958 at 
$5,533 per year. 

PATTERS017, Robert IC. , from Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective September 1, 
195G at $6,931 per year. 

PIRA, Edward S. , from Instructor of Agricultural Engineering to Instructor 

A ! , Agricultural Engineering, effective September 1, 1S58 at $6,240 per 
year. 

POTASH, Robert A. , from Assistant Professor of History to Associate Professor 
of History, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,435 per year. 

PROCOPlOj Paul N. , from Assistant Professor iS A", Landscape Architecture to 
Associate professor "A i! , Landscape Architecture, effective September 1, 
1958 at $8,060 per year. 

PURVIS, Albert W. , from Head of Department ! A" to Head of Division, effective 
September 1, 1958 at $11,635 per year. Has been at the University since 
1936 and Head of the Department since 1946. A.B. University of Hew 
Brunswick, M.Ed, and D.Ed. Harvard University. 

RAUCH, Harold, from Assistant Professor of Zoology to Associate Professor of 
Zoology, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,981 per year. 

RICCI, Benjamin, from Assistant Professor of Physical Education to Associate 
Professor of Physical Education, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,/08 
per year. 

RIGGS, Maida L. , from Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women to 
Associate Professor of Physical Education for Women, effective 
September 1, 1958 at $6,162 per year. 

SHAW, Frank R. , from Associate Professor of Entomology C>. Plant Pathology to 
Professor H A !! , Entomology and Plant Pathology, effective September 1, 
1953 at $9,100 per year. Has been at University since 1935. B.S. 
University of Massachusetts; Ph.D. Cornell University. 

STOCKTON, Doris S. , from Instructor of Mathematics (k time) to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics (% time), effective September 1, 1958 at $2,652 per 
year. 

SWARTZ, Marc J., from Instructor in Sociology to Assistant Professor of 
Sociology, effective September 1, 1558 at $5,070 per year. 



Schedule A 



/ * 



WILLIAMS, Arthur R. , from Assistant Professor of English to Associate Pro- 
fessor of English, effective September 1, 1958 at $6,981 per year. 

WYMAIT, Raymond, from Associate Professor of Education to Professor of Educa- 
tion, effective September 1, 1953 at $8,060 per year. Original date of 
appointment as Assistant Professor was September 1949. B.S. University 
of Massachusetts, Ed. M. and Ed.D, Boston University. 

MERIT INCREASES 

ANDERSON, Donald L. , Assistant Professor ,S A", Poultry Husbandry, effective 
September 28, 1953 from $6,435 to $6,981 (1 merit step). 

ANDERSON, John U. , Associate Professor of Accounting, effective August 31, 
1953 from $6,162 to $6,708 (1 merit step). 

BULLIS, Mrs. Catherine M. , Instructor in Chemistry, effective August 31, 1958 
from $4,316 to $4,V32 (1 merit step). 

CARPING, Louis A., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, effective August 31, 1953 
from $5,304 to $5,7V2 (1 merit step). 

COLLINS, Dan S. , Instructor in English, effective August 31, 1958 from $5,148 
to $5,564 (1 merit step). 

CRAIG , Albert M. , Instructor in History, effective August 31, 1958 from $4,940 
to $5,356 (1 merit step). 

DiMAGGIO, Gellestrina T. , Assistant Professor A' s ilursing, effective 

August 31, 1958 from $6,162 to $6,435 (1 merit step). Original step 
due 2/16/58. 

DEMIN0FF, William, Instructor in English, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,316 to $4,732 (1 merit step). 

DODGE, Harry W. , Jr., Instructor in Geology, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,732 to $5,148 (1 merit step). 

DOUGLAS, John G. , Instructor in Physical Education, effective August 31, 1953 
from $4,524 to $4,940 (1 merit step). 

EDWARDS, Frederick H. , Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
effective August 31, 11/5G from $5,/72 to $6,240 (1 merit step). 

EHRLICH, Leonard H, , Instructor in Philosophy, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,524 to $4,940 (1 merit step). 

FARQUHAR, Oswald G., Associate Professor of Geology, effective August 31, 1958 
from $6,435 to $6,981 (1 merit step). 

FERRIGN0, James M. , Professor of Romance Languages (3/4 time) effective 
August 31, 1953 from $5,811 to $6,279 (1 merit step). 

HOWES, Merle L. , Professor "A 81 , 4-H (Head, Extension Division of Youth Work), 
effective November 30, 1958 from $8,008 to $0,V36 (1 merit step). 



Schedule A 8. 

IIARDI, Vincent, Instructor in History, effective August 31, 1958 from $4,524 
to $4,940 (1 merit step). 

JAMES, Robert, Instructor in Physical Education, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,524 to $4,732 (1 merit step). Original step due 2/1/58. 

KING, Clarence W. , Professor of Sociology, effective August 31, 1958, from 
$7,124 to $8,060 (2 merit steps). 

LEWIT, David W. , Instructor in Psychology, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,524 to $4,940 (1 merit step). 

LITSKY, Warren, Professor 1: A' S Bacteriology, effective October 5, 1958 from 
$8,736 to $9,464 (1 merit step). 

MARCUS, Joseph S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, effective 
August 31, 1958 from $6,708 to $7,254 (1 merit step). 

McCULLOUGH, Mrs. Jane F, , Assistant Professor of Home Economics, effective 
August 31, 1958 from $5,7/2 to $6,240 (1 merit step). 

McMANAMY, Mary E. , Instructor in Education, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,732 to $5,148 (1 merit step). 

McWHORTER, Earl J,, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, effective August 31, 1953 
from $5,304 to $5,772 (1 merit step). 

MITCHELL, John H. , Assistant Professor of English, effective August 31, 1958 
from $5,772 to $6,240 (1 merit step). 

0' BYRNE, Joseph M, , Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective 
August 31, 1958 from $6,006 to $6,474 (1 merit step). 

RAIIDALL, William, Associate Professor of Recreation, effective August 31, 1958 
from $6,708 to $7,254 (1 merit step). 

ROGERS, Vincent R. , Assistant Professor of Education, effective August 31, 
1958 from $6,006 to $6,474 (1 merit step). 

ROSENBERG, Merton I., Instructor of Electrical Engineering, effective 
August 31, 1958 from $4,316 to $4,732 (1 merit step). 

SCHOEFFLER, Sidney, Associate Professor in Economics (% time), effective 

September 1, 1958 from $3,217.50 to $3,62/ (3 merit steps). He is coming 
back after a two years' leave of absence. 

SCHUSTER, Rudolf M. , Associate Professor of Botany, effective August 31, 1958 
from $6,435 to $7,254 (2 merit steps). 

SHUTE, Clarence W. , Head of Department of Philosophy, effective August 31, 1958 
from $8,003 to $3,736 (1 merit step). 

SNYDER, Dana P., Assistant Professor of Zoology, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$5,304 to $6,006 (2 merit steps). 



Schedule A £ 



>. 



WALLACE, Esther M. , Instructor in Physical Education for Women, effective 
August 31, 1958 from $4,940 to $5,564 (2 merit steps). 

ZANE, Edward Allan, Instructor in Marketing, effective August 31, 1958 from 
$4,732 to $5,148 (1 merit step). 

REAPPOINTMENTS 

EPSTEIN, Seymour, Associate Professor of Psychology (% time) to full time, 

effective September 1, 1958 at $6,435 per year. He has been on half time 
under a Mental Health Grant. 

SCHIFFER, Eva, Instructor in German (3/4 time) to full time, effective 

September I, 1958 at $4,940 per year. She has been one-quarter time 
under the Carnegie Language Project Fund. 

TRAHAN, Elizabeth Welt, Instructor in German (3/4 time) to full time, 
effective September 1, 1958 at $4,732 per year. She has been one- 
quarter time under the Carnegie Language Project Fund. 

REINSTATEMENT 

HOWELL, Mildred L. , Associate Professor i! A'' s 4-H, effective July 1, 1958 at 
$8,684 per year. 

CHANGE TO FU LL TIME EMPLOYMENT 

DePILLIS, Mario S., Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1958 at 
$4,316 per year. Approved for 3/4 time at July l s 1958 meeting. 

SUMMER SCHOOL E MPLOYMENT 

KOEKLER, Stanley G., Associate Professor of English, to replace David R. 
Clark for Summer School period July 24 to September 3. His salary 
should be $87.26 per week. Mr. Clark had previously been approved oy 
the Board at the May 31, 1953 meeting. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

SHAW, Frank R. , Associate Professor "A", Entomology and Plant Pathology (in 
lieu of Department Head ! A) 3 for the period July 6 through August 22, 
1958 at $167.00 per week (maximum). Dr. Shaw had similar appointments 
in 1956 and 195/. 

ZOUEIL, Mohamed E. , Instructor "A", Food Technology (% time) for the period 
July 1 through August 8, 1958 at $43.75 per week. 

CONTINUATION OF LEAV E OF ABSENCE WITHOUT PAY 

SMITH, Walter W. , Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering for the 
academic year 1958-59. 



Schedule A , Q 

APPOIETTMEKTS FOR G. E. PROGRAM, PITTSFIELD 

# ALLEN, Eliot D. , Associate Professor of English, first semester of academic 

year 1958-59 at $S;06.75. 

** BLOWE, Frank A., Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic year 1958- 
59 at $359.66. 

# EDWARDS, Frederick H. , Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, first 

semester of academic year 1958-59 at $1,040. 

# JAM, Robert P. , Associate Professor of English, first semester of academic 

year 1958-59 at $599.59. 

# LEAHY, John, Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic year 1958- 

59 at $377.00, 

# LITTLEJOHM, Lyance G. , Jr., Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic 

year 1958-59 at $754.00, 

# MARKS , Louis W. , Instructor in Mathematics, first semester of academic 

year 1958-59 at $754.00. 

# PHIKNEY, Arthur B. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, first semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $845.00. 

# PRUY11E, Granville, Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic year 

1958-59 at $377.00. 

# ROYS, Carl S. , Professor of Electrical Engiiieering, first semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $1,085.50. 

# SI11GER, Joseph, Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic year 1953- 

59 at $565.50. 

# U of M staff member 

# Previously employed on same program 
** New to program 

ADDITIOFAL COMPENSATION 

f»— I— -——>«»■ ——■—■»——»———■ I I l i I UUCP— — ■— 

BARTLETT, Lawrence H. , Principal Investigator, $115.38 per week, June 1, 1958 
to August 30, 1958, 1350-21 Research with Federal Grants Contract 
Ho. 14-16-008-542. 

J0A, Hans, Weather Observer, $1.25 per day, July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959 - 
not to exceed 360 days. (Twice daily readings). 

JOA, Hans, Weather Observer, $1.25 per hour, July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959 - 
not to exceed 400 hours. (Prepare weather records and reports). 



Schedule A 
11. 



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRAiYTS - EU73-C 

DUTCHER, Ray M. , Instructor "A", Bacteriology (% time), $2,652 for the period 
August 11, 1958 through August 31, 1959. 

GOLDMAtf, Charles L. , Assistant Professor Bacteriology "A", $6,162 per year 
for the period September 8, 1958 through August 31, 1959. 

RUSSELL, Warren, Instructor "A", Bacteriology Q% time), $2,652 for the period 
June 1, 1958 through August 29, 1958. 

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT OF TEA CHING STAFF OF PROJEC T AF 33(600) 35001 

To extend above project from June 20, 1958 to December 20, 1958. Payment will 
be at rate of 1/200 annual teaching salary (academic year) per day of work for 
following people: 

Dzialo, Frederick J., Instructor, Civil Engineering - $23.66 per day 
Grow, Thomas A., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering - $33.54 per day 
Osgood, Elmer, Professor, Civil Engineering - $41.86 per day 
White, Merit P., Head of Department, Civil Engineering - $49.0/ per day 

MEHTAL HEALTH TRAIKIKG GRAMT - 2M-6244-C3 

MYERS, Jerome L. , Assistant Professor of Psychology, effective September 1, 
1958 at $6,123 for the year. 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of August, September and October, 1958. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS S chedule B 

Minutes of Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
September 9, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Massachusetts 

Proposed Hew Cour ses of Study 

College of Arts and Science s 

Anthropology 65. Ethnographic Survey of Non-Literate Peoples 

An examination of the cultures of representative societies from Africa, 
Oceania, North America, South America, and Asia. The current cultures 
in each of the areas considered will oe viewed in relation to historical 
and environmental influences. The basic purpose of this course is to pro- 
vide an understanding of the diverse ways of life that men in various 
parts of the world have developed in response to the problems common to 
all humanity. 
3 class hours 
Prerequisite: Sociology 53 Credit 3 

Anthropology 66. The Individual and His Society in Cross -Cultural Perspective 
The effect of the forces of society in molding the individual are con- 
sidered through an examination of data from societies all over the world. 
Emphasis is placed on the great variety of means through which the 
basically similar needs of all men are satisfied. The aim here is to 
elucidate the processes by which men in different societies develop and 
maintain the distinctive customs and practices which characterize them. 
3 class hours 
Prerequisite: Sociology 53 Credit 3 

Mathematics 57. Linear Programming and Theory of Games 

Topics include sets, probability, vectors, matrices, and an introduction 
to linear programming and theory of games. 
3 class hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2 or 4 Credit 3* 

*Total credit for Mathematics 54 and 57 is limited to 
4 credit-hours because of duplication of topics. 

Physics 88. Solid State Physics 

An introduction to the theoretical and experimental physics of the 

solid state. 

3 class hours 

Prerequisite: Fhysics 85 Credit 3 

Physics 66. Kinetic Theory 

Classical kinetic theory of gases, with an introduction to phenomena in 

the non-uniform gas. 

3 class hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 55 Credit 3 

Physics 67. Statistical Mechanics and Information Theory 

A study of the concepts of entropy information, and order. 

3 class hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 61 Credit 3 



v & ,.' 



Schedule B 2. 

Sociology 5S. Social Stratification 

An examination of the factors which make for institutionalized inequality 
in social life. Major attention is given to studies of the structure of 
castes and classes in American society, and to the major European and 
American theorists, such as Marx, Weber, Veblen, Lynd, Davis, Dollard, 
Lipset, Sorokin, and Hollingshead, among others. Those theories and 
studies dealing with social mobility, its extent and the factors which 
produce it will also be considered. 
3 class hours 
Prerequisite: Sociology 25 Credit 3 

Speech S3. Argumentation and Debate 

The study and application of logical proof as it is used in public de- 
liberation. Enrollment limited to twenty. 
3 class hours 
Prerequisite: Speech SI Credit 3 

Linguistics 97. Linguistics 

A basic course combining comprehensive treatment of the field with special 

attention to recent contributions, particularly in structural linguistics, 

to the study of language and literature. 

3 class hours 

Prerequisite: English 25, 26 Credit 3 

School of Business Administration 

Management 66. Traffic Management 

The relationships and responsibilities among carriers, regulatory 

authorities and users of transportation services. 

Prerequisite: Management 65 Credit 3 

School of Enginee ring 

Industrial Engineering 53. Work Simplification and Time Study 

A study of the principles involved in the simplification of the means of 

performing manual operations and of the principles involved in the 

establishment of production standards. For students in Industrial 

Engineering. 

3 class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 5/ , Statistics 77 taken 

previously or concurrently Credit 4 

Industrial Engineering 79. Industrial Engineering Problems 

The principles of statistics, the theory of probability, the theory of 
games, and the principles of linear programming will be applied to the 
solution of problems in inventory control, production control, quality 
control, production standards, work measurement, delay allowances. 
3 class hours 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 57, Statistics 77; I.E. 53 Credit 3 

School of Home Economics 

Home Economics 86. Advanced Textiles 

An evaluation of the roles of newer fibers and finishes as they affect 
the appearance, performance, care and cost of apparel and household tex- 
tiles. Designed for those interested in clothing, textiles and merchandis- 
ing. 3 class hours; 1 hour lecture 
Prerequisite: Textiles 4 Credit 3 



' /u '*£# Cl^ C_ 



cat. 



Date May, 1958 



Subjects ture 



recent 
develor .,$ an 

expanded be ©ture 

major J 



9 



2. 



All the art q past 

(Art 21, being transferred 

to tl @s Septembe 1958. 

The Arbor i*' •idge xl is 

being transferred to Department logy 

and Plant Pathology, in "uture . 

Within the n i the New England Land 

Grant universl ' ssocia-: . artmen Landscape 

Architecture at the Univ<? has been 

designated &3 the reg ' . <"alized 

subject. 

In view of 3 above, it is desirable that tt rtment of 

Landscape Architect . acere I by ?>erioan 

Society of Landscape , fche i -nization 
represer -£esaio>. 

Snlaz ; :>o¥& points uld be 

®xplain#d that -,$ver »lied :credita« 

t Ion because the teac urses by its t , and the 

"core curriculum** req ?© made it 

impossible to include sui . .\*aes 

in Landscape Archite*. credit 

totals required by tl a tw< members 

of. the department (Pr • Mr* Mac Ives :?e 

transferred also 9 fch< ) will 

release two ?r 4 en for addit ' Lan* shi tec ture 

so that I iew p be e rei 

although it means s< load >uld also 

'be pointed that prion Landscape 
Architecture 8 while exc ■ 

still does not &d fey the 

Society* but accreditatJ »r- 
rmanc 

Land* 
soa;:»e Architec 



by a descrip' ip as catalogue copy* 

1'he program totals 13 of which four ere for freshman 
and sophomore military^ and It lis 3 id that 125 credit b be 
required for graduation Of theses k6 credits are strictly 
Landscape Architecture (including draftings 3» history 8 3 9 and 
architecture 8 6)0 An itional 9 credits are former horti- 
culture course Sj, now called Landscape Architecture^ totaling 
55 credits of courses designated as landscape Architecture* 
If a student is to prepare for practice in a design profession* 
an intensive education is now an absolute necessity in order to 
oop»pet@ with graduates of other schools 



covered ae follows: 



The core curriculum (now 36 credits) is 



A votal of 15 credits in English^ speech,, and 
on© additional 3 credit course » «, » © 

English 1 and 2 & 2$ and 26 ) Prescribed 






Elective (3 credits) as Philo 82» Speech 9X& t 8 

an advanced English course 



A total of £ credits from history and the 



Sociology 25 

On® 3 credit course selected from Economies 2$, 



physicals-biological sciences 



A total of U, credits from % thematic® and the 



an 

r< 



We ale® will require on® additional 3 credit 



Botany 2& 9 Entomology 26 8 or Agronomy 22 

An optional program in Landscape Operations 
will be submitted in the near future for approval e This is in 
general more flexible during the Junior** senior years but will 
be similar to the landscape architecture curriculum the first 
two years o 



it is hoped that the above proposals ca 
,a spring; so that the transition from the old '^r®« 
jram to the new may commence in September 1958 # 



Raymond H Q Ot'to e ! 
Land scaoe Archi t eeture 



Proposed Major Curriculum In L&nilsoape Architecture 





Freshman Year 




I st Semester. 


,.,::•'.,- ': 


2MJ$sms&$az 


CredUlPL 


English 1 


2 


English 2 


2 


Math 1 


3 


Speech 3 


2 


Chemistry 1 


3 • 


Math* 2 


3 


Botany 1 


3 


rti culture 2 


3 


Agriculture 1 


; 


Lando Archa 2 


3 


Military 


1 


Sociology 25 


3 


Physical Education 


ON* 


limitary . 


1 




TfT 


Physical Education 


"IF 




Smtas^O&as 


Itk Semesjbex 


*— JgrjrTOjttMn»SSim»aa^B5B 


-■- . . "■.". :■■'. . '.:...■ 


CgeJJ&s. 


English ; ; :f : 


3 


2 


Geology 5P 




Lando Arch* 2k 


Civil Engineering 27 


3 


Botany 26 , Ent 6 26 ®2» 




Land Archo 23 


} 


Agronomy 22 


3 


Art 33 


3 


-Land Areho 2© 


3 


Military 


I 


Land Arch,, 3© 


3 


Physical Education 


«- 


Military 


1 



1st Semester 
Land© Archo 53 
Land » Archo $$ 
Lando Archo 
Lando Archo 
Government 25 



3.SJ, Semester 
Land© Archo 
Lando Archo 

Elective® 



3 



2 nd Semester 

WtfSO^U«f *»r*>a?w«»C*daHi. < jXMUMi Kofi." ■■ - 

Lando Archo. 
Land© Archo 
Social Science 
Land a Arc 



iao>Mmuiu£KfS&& 



***■• 



-':.':■■'.:■-■ I->:^ 



■:;-,.;:.f. ■'>. ,*■?■■;: v 

Lando Archo 92 
Lands Archo 32 
Land* Archo 8*S- 



Credits required for graduation 125 



Agrostology 53 
Floriculture 81 
Botany 81 
Art 75 
Forestry 71 
Agricultural Engiiiee 
Speech 91 
Lando Archo 73 • 75 



■'.sstology $6 
Floriculture 2$ 
Philor ' 82 

Art 34 
Art 78 

Civil r 90 

;4 



1? 
ditj 

3 




17 



2 









■-■oturep Bacon, 
Visiting Lecturer Khntl&niSo 



'''-artsnuuip in- 
-'Speotive, . 

Credit 3 
». Procopio 






Survey of LtiiailsoGpo Architecture 



Escape Architecture 
and al ( fie 3 design of forms , 

motif a, and com 

J elaa.*; irs Credit 3 

Mi% Otto 

2I4.. (XI) .Topography and Construe 

Contour Interpolate, and drainage, drive de- 
sign, profiles and sections, ' •- e&rthwor: Application 
©f surveying to landscape ©on 
1 class hour* 3 2«hour labor*" Oredit k. 

Prerequisites s O.B. 27, and I Mr« Hamilton 

28* (II) Basic Design 

elements and principles of design^ end the analysis 



©f composition* 

1 class hour, 2 2»hour laboratory periods Credit J 

Prerequisites! Landscape Architecture 2 and 23, or Mr. Otto 
permission of the instructor 

30* (II) Plant Materials 

Detailed study of decidual® end evergreen trees, with 
special reference to their mature form &:nd character, means of 
identification, natural associations, and usee of the various types 
of trees in landscape work,,. 
1 class hour j 2 2~hour laboratory periods Credit 3 

!fr. Hamilton 






1 






ic 
lass 

$25oOO, 

Or#dit 1^ 
Mr* Blundsll 















dan features 
as walks 9 st$: 

class Oredit ij. 

Prerequisite- 



59 • Plant Material 



Ida D loation, with special * 



bllity. to the various - landscape uses. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods 



their 
air adapts- 
and 
'"adit 3 



M p 



I) Arch J 



of archltee deve leprae: 



styles and forms in architecture* asp® el ally as 

and methods of construction* 
2 75-rainute lectures 



68„ (II) Architectural Design 



< 9 including 

tad fey materials 

Oredit 3 

Mr* Kantianis 



relations between exterior and interior spaces and 
structures as a primary element in design and construction, A series 
of problems integrating theory* deisign an&lysiSj, and graphics, 

1 class hour, 2 3™hour laboratory periods Credit if 
Prerequisites L„ A, 6? Mr., Spencer 

75.. (I) Planting Design 

A study of the utilization of plant materials in combina- 
tion as applied to the m&ny conditions mnd &mi&n&® of landscape work* 

2 3=°hPo laboratory periods Credit 3 

>; A/7 30 + £-<? Mr* Blundell 



1 



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3 elaasK 



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" :i;;: Cl) -82. (IX) Advanced D®j 

shanga • 8 specialized landscape details 

SL ft /?^?7/f d6- ^' of thl ! o1 *" -ill' 'Wired to 

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give this aourse, B apeneer 

L 8 A* 92 (I:: Ft. 

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methods and praetieea of the prof as of flea. ft ® 

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0NIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 



From a • Graduate. School Office* «•«*<»« Date . . $ept@i&er 2,«19£6 . • , 
To 8 , , President's Of fie®. • •»•«••«•«. ••.••••••.••o 



The Graduate School Council recoraaands to the President and Trustees 
approval of the following courts for graduate students ealys 

Credit, l<**6o 

Busi ness Administration 

266* IkfeMfflf STUDY AND RESEARCH. Ir*dependent study and research 
on selected problems lis Business Administration* Pens&eelcn of Instructor 
and the Dean required. Credit, 3 each sexester* 




IBS'. TOPICS IN FHYSIGAL CHEMISTRY. 
Prerequisites,. Chemistry 177* 1B6* or equivalent* Credit, 2. 

Econofaios 

"WfiU COLLECTIVE BaBGOTING* Th® legal background of collective bar 



gaining* the prooaas, subject matter and problem© involved with individual 

ease problems* 

Prerequisite* Economies 179© Credit, 3* 



Geolos 



220 c STMT IGMBilC PALEONTOLOGY* Application of selected fossils and 
fauaal asser&lages to strati graphic correlations and paleoscological mi 
paleogaographic analysis, idth reference to evolutionary trends* 
Prerequisites, ecology 163 and l?8 ffl Credits 2« 

23b. REGIONAL GEOLOGY OF NORTH AIIERICA, Str&tigraphic and tectonic 
evolution of North American Continents 
-Prerequisites, Geology 2$ 33 * and 1?8* Credit, 2. 

2^0. GEOCHEMISTRY. Principles of geochemistry and interpretation of 
geochemie&l data in relation to geological processes and to the origin and 
history of the earth. 

Prerequisites, Geology l&, 156, one year of college Chemistry and 
permission of instructore Credit, 2. 

Horticulture 

Floriculture 

201. FLORI CULTURAL LITERATURE, A critical Tevim of scientific litera- 
ture in the field of floriculture. Topics selected according to th® 
interests and needs of the individual student* Credit $ 2 each seroster. 

Maximum credit, h* 

203* ADVANCED SYSTEMATIC FLORICULTURE. ?©3sonos&e study of floriculture! 
plants* This work to be undertaken in summer only. 
Prerequisites, Floriculture 181 and Botany V>9> 160. Credits 3* 

Gilbert L. ¥oodsid© 




K 



<:J~£< (£ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Memorandum 
FROM: Thomas W. Fox. Department of Poultry Husbandry 



TO: Gilbert L. Woodside, Dean, Graduate School 



SUBJECT : Ph«D. program In Poultry Science 



The Department of Poultry Husbandry requests permission of the Graduate School 
Council to establish a graduate program leading to the Ph.D. degree. The department 
has offered graduate work in poultry science since 1923. The first Master of Science 
degree was awarded in 1932 and since that time 25 students have completed graduate 
work, 12 during the last ten years, During the period 1941 - 1948, the Ph.D. degree 
was offered and two students completed the requirements for the degree. 

In 1948 it was decided to discontinue the Ph.D. program because of the 
limited number of poultry department staff members who were on the graduate faculty 
and actively pursuing research work. Thi9 was a sound decision under the circum- 
stances. Since 1948 the number of staff members pursuing research work has in- 
creased and also the areas of interest have expanded to include genetics, physiol- 
ogy and nutrition. In 1955 a nutrition research program was established supported 
by adequate chick rearing facilities and a well equipped biological laboratory. 
An expanded research program in avian physiology will begin in July 1958. 

Also, since 1948, the supporting courses available in other departments have 
increased. These courses include expanded offerings in genetics, endocrinology 
and physiology by the zoology department. The chemistry department can provide 
sound basic science courses in support of the nutrition and physiology program. 

Of the 12 graduate students who have completed the requirements for a M.S. 
degree at Massachusetts since 1948, seven have continued graduate study and have 
received or are candidates for the Ph.D. degree at other institutions. These 
institutions include Purdue, Iowa State College, Ohio State College, Minnesota and 
Pennsylvania. State University. 

If this request is acted on favorably by the Graduate Council it is planned 
to offer the Ph.D. degree with major work in (1) genetics and physiology, (2) 
nutrition, and (3) physiology and nutrition. In these subject areas sound graduate 
programs can be offered with existing personnel and coordinated with existing de- 
partmental research projects. It is the intent of the department to restrict grad- 
uate programs to those areas of specialization in which staff and research support 
are adequate. 

Enclosed is a short summary including the historical development of the de- 
partment research and graduate program, list of graduate students with thesis titles, 
current staff, publications, current research projects and course additions or 
changes necessary if this request is approved. 



Thomas W. Fox 
b. Department Head 



A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE RESEARCH AND GRADUATE PROGRAM 
IN POULTRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MASS . 

Prof. John C. Graham established a Poultry Department at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College in 1911 upon his arrival from the University of Wisconsin. 
Prof. Graham in addition to organizing an instruction program in poultry husbandry, 
recognized the need for the investigation of the genetics of egg production and 
other traits of economic importance in poultry. 

In 1912 the services of Dr. Hubert D. Goodale, a student of Dr. Thomas Hunt 
Morgan, were obtained to establish a poultry genetics research program. During 
Dr. Goodale' s ten years at the University he contributed greatly to the knowledge 
of the genetics of egg production and quantitative inheritance in general, and 
also completed basic and original studies on gonadectomy in the domestic fowl. Dr. 
Goodale left the University in 1922 to continue genetic studies with poultry and 
laboratory animals at the Mount Hope Farm, Williams town, Mass. 

Dr. Goodale 's successor, Dr. Frank A. Hays, continued genetic research until 
his retirement in February, 1958. Dr. Hays published over 150 scientific articles 
on the inheritance and biology of egg production and economic traits in poultry. 
Mr. Costas Nicolaides was the first student to complete the requirements for a 
Master of Science degree from Massachusetts State College in 1932. His graduate 
program was directed by Dr. Hays. 

During this period other members of the instruction staff were involved in 
research activities dealing with incubation and production practices. Among these 
was Prof. William C. Sanctuary who reported original observations on the so-called 
"peck order" or social behavior in the domestic fowl. 

Dr. Raymond Parkhurst was appointed department head upon the retirement of 
Prof. John C. Graham in 1938. From 1938 to 1943, Dr. Parkhurst pursued an active 



-2- 
research program in poultry nutrition and three graduate students completed 
Master of Science degrees under his direction. 

Prof. Fred P. Jeffrey succeeded Dr. Parkhurst in 1943 and was department head 
until 1954. Prof. Jeffrey conducted an active research program on the genetic 
interactions of the dominant white gene with various cryptoroeres encountered in 
transferring this gene to broiler type breeding stocks. Also, his studies on egg 
quality and certain egg inclusions resulted in his recognition as an authority in 
this field. Three graduate students studied under his direction. 

Dr. J. Robert Smyth, Jr. joined the staff of the University in 1949 and 
established a turkey research program in genetics and physiology with special 
emphasis on the physiology of reproduction. Comparable studies were established 
with the domestic fowl. Dr. Smyth has been an active researcher and has guided 
the graduate work of eight Master's candidates. 

In 1952 Dr. Thomas W. Fox joined the poultry department staff and in 1954 
succeeded Prof. Fred P. Jeffrey as department head, following the appointment of 
Prof. Jeffrey as Associate Dean of the College of Agriculture in charge of resident 
instruction. Dr. Fox's field of specialization is poultry breeding and physiology. 
Three students have completed graduate work under his direction. 

With the appointment of Dr. Donald L. Anderson as nutritionist in 1955 the 
department research program was strengthened and broadened. No active nutrition 
research program had been in operation since the resignation of Dr. Raymond Park- 
hurst in 1943. Dr. Anderson re-established an active research program and con- 
tributes excellent additional support to the total program with his professional 
competence in the field of biochemistry and physiology. 

Dr. William J. Mellen is slated to join the staff as of July 1958. Dr. Mellen 
has an established reputation in the field of avian physiology with minor interest 
and training in both genetics and nutrition and will expand and solidify the depart- 
ment's total research program. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS GRANTED ADVANCED DEGREES IN POULTRY SCIENCE 
AND INCLUDING THESIS TITLES (1932-1958) 

1. Nicolaidea, Costas, 1932. Fertility and hatchability studies in poultry, M.S. 

2. Strickland, John V., 1932. Studies on the effects of different temperature 

gradients as produced under three brooder stoves upon body weight, feathering 
and sleeping groups of chicks. M.S. 

3. Sanctuary, Wm. C, 1932. A study on avian behavior to determine the nature of 

persistency of the order of dominance in the domestic fowl and to relate these 
to certain physiological reactions. M.S. 

4. Jeffrey, Fred P., 1934. A study of Rhode Island Red feather pigmentation. M.S. 

5. Risenan, Henry, 1936. Nutritive studies on the basic cereal grains. M.S. 

6. Landis, Albert, 1938. A microscopic study of germinal development in fresh-laid 

hen eggs. M.S. 

7. Pyenson, Maxwell, 1939. Studies on artificial insemination in domestic fowl. M.S. 

8. Dickens, Fred L. , 1940. A study of the use of corn distillers' dried and semi- 

solid grains with solubles for poultry feeding. M.S. 

9. Jefferson, Emery J., 1942. Crab meal vs. fish meal in the ration for laying and 

breeding hens. M.S. 

10. Thornton, E. J., 1944, Possible genetic factors and embryonic mortality in 

relation to the sex ratio in chicks at hatching. M.S. 

11. Walker, Courtney E. , 1945. The influence of inbreeding on embryonic mortality. 

M.S. 

12. Taimadge, Daniel W. , 1947. Effects of storage temperatures on the hatchability 

of eggs, M.S. 

13. Munday, R. A,, 1947. External characters of hens' eggs in relation to their 

fertility, hatchability and sex ratio. Ph.D. 

14. Walker, C. E. , 1948. An hereditary study of certain defects in fresh eggs 

(blood and meat spots). Ph.D. 

15. Merritt, E. S., 1950, Studies on the origin and nature of meat spots in eggs. 

M.S. 

16. Fox, Thomas W, , 1950. Heat tolerance in the domestic fowl. M.S. 

17. Welch, Patrick H. 2nd,, 1951. Avian sperm viability in natural and unnatural 

environments. M.S. 

18. Glick, Bruce, 1952. The effect of thiouracil on the feather pigmentation of 

the fowl. M.S. 

19. Leighton, A, T., 1953. A study of certain factors affecting fertility in the 

turkey. M.S. 



-2- 

20. Hutchings, Herbert C. Jr., 1954. A study of the reproductive efficiency of 

pullets during the first few weeks of egg production, M.S. 

21. Koski, Richard A., 1954. Certain milk products as chicken semen diluents. M.S. 

22. Levis, Bruce, 1954. Spermatogenesis and the effects of the drug enheptin on 

testis function of the turkey. M.S. 

23. Kinney, Terry, 1956. A study of some statistical methods as applied to data 

from the Massachusetts Chicken and Turkey Broiler Test. M.S. 

24. Redman, Charles, 1956. The effects of furoxone on the reproductive ability 

of the male turkey. M.S. 

25. Hawes, Robert 0., 1958. Genetic and nutritional inflnoncea on the incidence of 

clubbed down in the fowl. M.S. 

Staff Personnel Participating in the Graduate Program 

Thomas W. Fox, Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Head of Department. 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., 1949; University of Massachusetts, M.S., 
1950; Purdue University, Ph.D., 1952. Three years in the U.S. Army; the 
University of Massachusetts since 1952, Sigma Xi, Phi Tau Sigma, Poultry 
Science Association, Genetic Society of America, A.A.A.S. 

J. Robert Smyth, Jr., Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

University of Maine, B.S., 1945; Purdue University, M.S., 1947; Purdue University, 
Ph.D., 1949. University of Massachusetts since 1949. Sigma Xi, Genetics Society 
of America, Poultry Science Association. 

William J. Mellen, Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., 1949; Cornell University M.S. , 1951; 
Cornell University Ph.D., 1953. Three years U.S. A.A.F. during World War II. 
Five years as associate professor of poultry and animal physiology, University 
of Delaware (1953-58). Joined the University of Massachusetts staff July 1958. 
Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, A.A.A.S., New York Academy of Sciences, Poultry Science 
Association. 

Donald L. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., 1950; University of Connecticut, M.S., 1952; 
Cornell University Ph.D., 1955. Three years U.S. Navy during World War II; the 
University of Massachusetts since 1955. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Tau Sigma; 
A.A,A,S., Poultry Science Association. 

STAFF PUBLICATIONS 

Hill, F. W, , D. L. Anderson and L. M. Dansky, 1954. Studies on the relation of 
dietary energy level to rate and efficiency of egg production. Poultry Science 
33: 1059. (Abstract), 

Hill, F. W, , D. L. Anderson and L, M. Dansky, 1956. Studies of the energy require- 
ments of chickens. 3. The effect of dietary energy on the rate and gross 
efficiency of egg production. Poultry Science 34: 54-59. 



•■ ■ ■:■■■>'■ :'■■"£■ 



-3- 

Hlll, F. W. and D, L. Anderson, 1955. Comparison of productive energy and metabol- 
izable energy determinations with chicks. Poultry Science 34: 1201. (Abs.) 

Hill, F, W. and D. L. Anderson, 1958. Comparison of metabolizable and productive 
energy determinations with growing chicks. J. Nutrition (In press). 

Anderson, D. L., 1955. Comparative studies on the determination of metabolizable 
and productive energy with the growing chick. Doctorate Thesis, Cornell Univer- 
sity, Ithaca, New York. 

and F. W. Hill, 1954. Effects of fibrous bulk on the utilization 



of a high energy chick ration for growth. Poultry Science 33: 1038. (Abs.) 
and F. W. Hill, 1955. Determination of metabolizable energy value 



for chicks of pure carbohydrates, cellulose, fat and casein. Poultry Science 34: 
1176 (Abs.) 

, 1955. The energy value of poultry feeds. Proceedings of the 



Cornell Nutrition Conference for Feed Manufacturers. 

, 1955. Meat chickens need high energy rations. Cornell Feed 



Service No. 46, July. 

, F. W. Hill and Ruth Renner, 1958. Studies of the metabolizable 

and productive energy of glucose for the growing chick. J. Nutr . (In press). 

, 1958. See Smyth 1958. 



Kinney, Terry B. and T. W. Fox, 1957. Consideration concerning the application of 
statistics to random sample broiler tests. Poultry Science 36: 877-880. 

Kinney, Terry B., J. Robert Smyth, Jr. and T. W, Fox, 1956. Relation between turkey 
breast width as measured at a constant body depth and at a percentage of body 
width. Poul . Sci. 35: 1126-1127. 

Fox, Thomas W. , 1951. Studies on heat tolerance in the domestic fowl. Poultry 
Science 30: 477-483. 

m , 1951. See Smyth, 1951. 

, and B. B. Bohren, 1954. An analysis of feed efficiency among breeds 
of chickens and its relationship to rate of growth. Poultry Science 33: 549-561. 

i 1955. Effects of progesterone on growth and sexual development in 
S.C. White Leghorns. Poultry Science 34: 598-602. 

, 1953. See Smyth, 1953. 

, 1958. See Smyth, 1958. 



, 1957. The curriculum for undergraduate poultry husbandry majors. 



Poultry Science 36: 1172 (Abs.) 



-4- 

Cover, M.S., W. J. Mellen and E, Gill, 1955. Studies of hemorrhagic syndromes in 
chickens. Cornell Vet. 45: 366-386. 

Mellen, W. J., 1956. Hereditary exencephaly in the fowl. Poultry Sci . 35: 1158 
(Aba.) 

, 1957. Further comments on "controlling sex" in chickens. Poultry 



Sci. 36: 1384-1386. 



,, 1958. Duration of effect of thyroxine and thiouracil in young 



chickens. Poultry Sci . 37 (in press). 

, and L. B. Hardy, Jr., 1957. Blood protein-bound iodine in the fowl. 



Endocrinology 60: 547-551. 



mt and F. W, Hill, 1953. Effects of thiouracil, thyroprotein and estro- 



gen upon the basal metabolism and thyroid size of growing chickens. Poultry 
Sci . 32: 994-1001. 

, and , 1954. Basal metabolism and thyroid size in chickens 



fed thiouracil and a thiouracil -thyroprotein combination, Poultry Sci . 33: 
872-874. 

, and , 1955. Studies of the avian respiratory quotient. 



Poultry Sci , 34: 1085-1089. 

, _______________ and H. H« Dukes, 1954. Studies of the energy re- 
quirements of chickens. 2. Effect of dietary energy level on the basal metab- 
olism of growing chickens. Poultry Sci . 33: 791-798. 

, and E. F. Waller, 1954. Antibiotics and thyroid size in growing 



chickens. Poultry Sci . 33: 1036-1037, 

Jeffrey, F. P., T. W. Fox and J. R, Smyth, Jr., 1953. Observations on double-yolked 
eggs from the domestic fowl. Jour . Hered . 44: 213-216, 

Redman, C. E. and J, Robert Smyth, Jr., 1957, The effects of furazolidone on the 
reproductive ability of the male turkey. Poultry Sci . 36: 437-443. 

Levis, B, N. and J. R. Smyth, Jr., 1957. The effects of 2-aroino, 5-nitrothiazole on 
testis function in the turkey. Poultry Sci . 36: 1206-1211. 

Smyth, J, Robert, Jr., 1947. A study of the pigments of the epidermal structures 
of the fowl. ty.S. thesis, Purdue University. 

, and B. B. Bohren, 1949. A multiple allelic series affecting 



feather color in the domestic fowl. Poultry Science 28: 782. (Abs.) 

, J. W. Porter and B, B. Bohren, 1951. A study of pigments from 



red, brown and buff feathers and hair. Physiol . Zool . 24: 205-216 

, and T. W. Fox, 1951. The thyroxine secretion rate of turkey 



poults. Poultry Science 30: 607-614. 



& 



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• V? ■ 



-6< 



Hatch #149 



State #5059 



State #5060 



The Effect of Mineral Balance on Requirements of Laying Chickens for 

Maintenance of Egg Production and Reproduction. 
(A basic study in mineral metabolism to determine the mineral re- 
quirements of chickens with rations of different caloric content. 
The study of the so-called "cage fatigue" syndrome or osterperosis 
has received special emphasis during the past year.) 

Genetics and Physiology of the Length of the Incubation Period in 

the Chicken. 
(Two lines of chickens have been developed through selection that 
vary greatly in the length of the incubation period. Results to 
date indicate a relatively high heritability of this trait and exten- 
sive physiological studies have been conducted on the two lines.) 

Development of Inbred Lines of White Plymouth Rocks. 
(Several inbred lines have been developed with coefficients of in- 
breeding now exceeding 50%. Inbreeding has been accompanied by sel- 
ection for mating frequency in some lines and egg quality character- 
istics in others.) 



State #5061 



State #5062 



State #5106 



Effect of Sperm Survival Time in the Female Reproductive Tract on 

Fertility and Hatchability. 
(Two lines of chickens have been differentiated that differ in the 
duration that fertile eggs will be produced following a single insem- 
ination. Various studies of semen quality and the physiological 
attributes of the female reproductive tract are being conducted.) 

Heat Tolerance and Thermo -regulation in Domestic Fowl. 

(Effects of altered thyroid activity on tolerance to high temperatures 

are being studied). 

Effects of Serpasil on Production and Reproduction. 

(The effects of the tranquil izing drug, reserpine, on production 

and reproduction is being investigated.) 



POULTRY SCIENCE 
Thomas W. Fox, major adviser 
COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

200. Special Problems - Research problems or critical literature review in avian 
genetics, physiology or nutrition not related to the candidates thesis. 

Credits 1-6 
The Staff 

205. Avian Genetics - A lecture course covering the genetics of the principal 
domesticated birds. The physiology of reproduction of avian species will be 
considered in detail. 

Prerequisites, at least one year's training in biology and zoology 153 or 
its equivalent ♦ Credit 3 

Mr. Smyth 

206. Advanced Poultry Genetics - The principles of population genetics and the 
problems of quantitative inheritance as they apply to selection for economic 
traits in poultry. Theoretical and practical considerations of breeding 
systems will be discussed. 

Prerequisite, Poultry 205, Zoology 153, Poultry 177 or its equivalent, 

Credit 3 
Mr. Fox 

207. Advanced Poultry Nutrition - Lectures and reports on research methods and 
designs for poultry nutrition experiments, Also discussion of current 
research developments and theories. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 151, 152 and 179, and Poultry 173 or its equivalent. 

Credit 3 
Mr. Anderson 

208. Advanced Poultry Physiology - Lectures and reports on specific problems in 
avian physiology. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 179, one year biology. 

Credit 3 
Mr, Mel 1 en 

250, 251. Seminar - Review of Current Literature. Credit, 1 each semester 

The Staff 
Maximum Credit 4 

300, Thesis, Master's Degree, Credit 10 

400, Thesis, Ph.D. Degree, Credit 30 



-2- 

COURSES OPEN TO ^OTH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

(For Minor Credit) 

163. Poultry Biology. A course to acquaint the student with the specific biolog- 
ical attributes of the domestic fowl. Emphasis is placed on anatomy and 
physiology of the digestive, reproductive and endocrine systems and specific 
physiological responses to environmental influences are presented. 

Credit 3 
Mr. Mellen 

173. Poultry Nutrition. A study of the scientific principles of nutrition, 

nutritive classification of feedstuffs, formulation and calculation of rations 
for specific purposes* Credit 3 

Mr. Anderson 

177. Poultry Breeding. The improvement of poultry by selection is developed 

through a study of the principles of heredity. The inheritance of morpholog- 
ical and physiological characters including plumage color, egg production, 
meat production, hatchability, egg traits and disease resistance. 

Credit 3 
Mr. Fox 

COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS FOR WHICH MAJOR CREDIT WILL BE GIVEN 



Agronomy 264. Experimental Methods in Agronomy. 
Animal Husbandry 205. Advanced Animal Nutrition. 
Animal Husbandry 211. Advanced Animal Genetics* 
Animal Husbandry 216. Fertility and Fecundity. 
Animal Husbandry 226. The Histology of Domestic Animals. 
Bacteriology 202. Advanced Bacterial Physiology. 
Chemistry 182. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. 
Chemistry 193, 194. General Biochemistry. 
Chemistry 234. Advanced Biochemical Lectures. 
Chemistry 235. Biochemical Laboratory Methods 



Credit 3 
Mr. Yegian 

Credit 3 
Mr. Archibald and Mr. Elliot 



Credit 3 
Mr. Gaunt and Mr. Black 

Credit 3 
Mr. Black 

Credit 3 
Mr. Greenstein 

Credit 3-5 
Mr. Mandel 

Credit 4 
Mr. Cannon 

Credit, 4 each semester 
Mr. Little 

Credit 3 
Mr. Little 

Credit 3-5 
Mr. Little 



-3- 



Chemistry 236. Advanced Biochemical Analysis. 



Chemistry 237. Biocolloids. 



Credit 3-5 
Mr. Little 

Credit 3 
Mr* Bennett 



Chemistry 239. Chemistry of Natural Products. Credit 2 

Mr. Little and Mr. McWhorter 

Home Economics 203. Advanced Nutrition. Metabolism of the major foodstuffs. 

Credit 3 
Miss Mitchell 

Home Economics 204. Advanced Nutrition. Vitamins and Minerals. Credit 3 

Miss Mitchell 

Home Economics 205. Laboratory Methods and Techniques in Nutrition. Credit 3 

Mrs. Wertz 



Home Economics 212. Nutrition Seminar. 

Zoology 173. General Cytology. 

Zoology 178. Genetics of Animal Populations. 

Zoology 183. General and Cellular Physiology. 

Zoology 184. Comparative Physiology, 

Zoology 187. Endocrinology. 

Zoology 220. Experimental Embryology. 

Zoology 245. Advanced Vertebrate Physiology. 

Zoology 248. Physiological Genetics. 

Zoology 255. Zoology Seminar. 

Zoology 260. Physiology Seminar. 



Credit 1 
Miss Mitchell 

Credit 3 

Mr. Ro 11a son 

Credit 2 
Mr. Rauch 

Credit 4 
Mr. Swenson 

Credit 4 
Mr. Roberts 

Credit 3 
Mr. Snedecor 

Credit 3 
Mr. Woodside 

Credit 3 
Mr. Snedecor 

Credit 3 
Mr. Rauch 

Credit 1 

Credit 1 
Mr . Swenson 



■> 2 1 



\i, ''.■' 



' tVfi I.- 



*&*&&£ '{tpf 



r4- 

COURSE FOR MINOR CREDIT ONLY 

(No graduate credit for students majoring in Poultry Science) 

135« Advanced Poultry Husbandry. A critical review of research in any one of 

these fields: (a) genetics and physiology, (b) nutrition, (c) marketing, or 
(d) incubation and brooding. Three written reports and a comprehensive 
final examination are required. This course is designed for teachers of 
vocational agriculture. 

Credit 3 
The Staff 
Prerequisites are standard undergraduate courses in poultry husbandry. 

OTHER CATALOGUE CHANGES 

Add: Poultry Science to the courses available as major subjects for the 
degree Doctor of Philosophy to the section titled "General Information" and found 
on page 12 1957-1959 catalogue. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 11, 1958, 10:30 a.m., Student Union, Univ. of Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Miss Buxton, Crowley, Haigis, 
McNamara, Miss Schuck, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Secretary pro tem for the meeting. 

Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Finance Committee, reported 

for the committee on their meeting that was held on October 7, 1958. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To postpone buying any common stock at 
this time. 

On recommendation of the Finance Committee and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



To accept the report of the Finance 
Committee including the following 
security transactions: 



To sell: 15 shares, common stock, Northern 
Illinois Gas Co. 
2/50 of a share of common stock, 
Commonwealth Edison Co. 

To buy: 10,000 Southwestern Bell Telephone 
Co. bonds 4 3/4 due 10/1/92 

10,000 Florida Power & Light Co. 
bonds 4 3/8 due 12/1/86 

10,000 Public Service Electric & 
Gas bonds 4 5/8 due 8/1/88. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, reported on the meeting held on October 10, 1958. The 

committee designated sites for new buildings included in the Capital 

Outlay program that is now before the Legislature designating the 

areas for each building as shown on the Master Plan. 



2025 



Stocks and 
Bonds 



2026 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 

Architects 



On recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee 

and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the following list of architects 
in order of priority as listed for each 
project and recommend to the Commission on 
Administration and Finance for appointment 
with preference being given to the number 
one choice of the Trustees. 



Physical Education Building for Men 

1. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, 

Associated Architects 
220 Dwight Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

2. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

3* James A. Brit ton 

315 Federal Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Natural Resources Classroom & Laboratory Building 

1. James A. Britton 

315 Federal Street, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

2. Walter Gaffney Assoc. Inc. 

60 West Main Street, Hyannis, Massachusetts 

3. Clinton Foster Goodwin 

25 Washington Square, Haverhill, Massachusetts 



Science Center - Fourth Section 

1. James H. Ritchie & Associates 

135 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Leland, Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard 

711 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

Addition to Food Technology Building 

1. Harold C. Knight Associates 

73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Clinton Foster Goodwin 

25 Washington Square, Haverhill, Massachusetts 

3. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, 

Associated Architects 
220 Dwight Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 

Addition to Physics Building 

1. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. James H. Ritchie & Associates 

135 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Harold C. Knight Associates 

73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Classrooms and Offices, School of Business Administration 

1. Campbell and Aldrich 

38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Maginnis & Walsh & Kennedy 

126 Newbury Street, Boston 16, Massachusetts 

3. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Ames Building, Boston, Massachusetts 

Engineering Building and Service Building for Experiment Sta. 

1. Leland, Larsen, Bradley and Hibbard 

711 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

2. Smith and Sellew 

283 Dartmouth Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

3. Harold C. Knight Associates 

73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Improvements and Additions to the Power Plant and Utility 
Systems 

Merrill Associates - Power P ant, Steam and Electric 

210 South Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Whitman and Howard, Inc. - Water, Drainage & Sewers 
89 Broad Street, Boston 10, Massachusetts 

Trustee Whitmore stated that his committee had made an 

inspection of the Women's Physical Education Building and that they 

were very pleased with this new facility for the women's program. 

On the recommendation of the committee and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the Women's Physical Education 
Building, Mass. State Project U-603 - 
M. J. Walsh & Sons, contractor, subject 
to correction of minor items contained on 
the list in the hands of the Treasurer 
within the contract period of one year as 
provided for in the contract. 

On recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, 



it was 



VOTED ; To accept Mass. State Contract U-702 - 
Contract #10 - addition to the Electric 
Distribution System - Reynolds Brothers 
Inc. contractor as having been completed 
in accordance with the plans and speci- 
fications. 



2027 



Women's Physical 

Education 

Building 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



2028 



TRUSTEE 



Wheeler 
House 



Lincoln 
Apartments 



Justin S. 
Morrill 
Science Center 



Lemuel 

Shattuck 

Auditorium 



Nathaniel 
Bowditch Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Whitmore reported that his committee had re- 
ceived from the President and the faculty Board for Naming Build- 
ings recommendations for names for new buildings. On recommenda- 
tion of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, it was 

VOTED : To name Dormitory 15 - Wheeler House in honor 
of the late William Wheeler who served as a 
Trustee of the University from 1880 to 1928 
and who served as Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees from 1926 to 1928, a graduate of the 
Class of 1871, Professor of Mathematics and 
Civil Engineering at his alma mater and Act- 
ing President and President of Hokkaido Uni- 
versity from 1877 to 1880. In 1929 he was 
awarded an honorary degree from Massachusetts 
State College (LL.D.). 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee recommended the name 

suggested by the Faculty Committee of Lincoln Gardens for the 

faculty-married student apartments on Lincoln Avenue. Members of 

the Board objected to the use of the term Gardens in reference to 

these apartments and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To name the faculty-married student apartments 
on Lincoln Avenue - L incoln Apart me nt s. 

On recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee 

and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To name the Science Center - Justin S. Morrill 
Science Center in recognition of the Senator 
from Vermont who sponsored the land grant college 
legislation in Congress and who was recognized 
for his policy statements in support of public 
higher education made on this campus. 

It was 

VOTED ; To name the auditorium in the Public Health 

Building - Le muel Shattuck Auditorium in recogni- 
tion of the pioneering contributions to the de- 
velopment of public health doctrine and ad- 
ministration of Lemuel Shattuck. 

It was 

VOTED: To name the Plant Science Building including 

the Vegetable Gardening building now under con- 
struction the Nathaniel Bowditch Hall in memory 







2029 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




1 


of Nathaniel Bowditch a Trustee of the Uni- 
versity from 1896 to 1945 and Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees from 1934 to 1945. 




TRUSTEE 


It was 






VOTED: To name the Women's Physical Education Building - 
The Women's Physical Education Building until 
such time as a suitable name is available. 


Women's Physical 

Education 

Building 




Trustee Whitmore reported that the faculty Board for 






Naming Buildings had recommended and his Committee on Buildings and 






Grounds had accepted and were recommending to the Board of Trustees 






that the Liberal Arts Building be named the Joseph Warren Bartlett 
Hall in honor of the Chairman of the Board. Dr. Bartlett declined 


Liberal Arts 
Building 




the honor at this time even though there was unanimous expression 






of opinion in favor of this name by all members of the Board of 




1 


Trustees present. The recommendation remained in the Buildings and 




1 


Grounds Committee. 






Trustee Crowley suggested and President Mather stated 






that he would refer the suggestion to the faculty Board on Naming 






Buildings that consideration be given to honoring leaders in 






Massachusetts history by naming future buildings for them. 






Trustee Whitmore reported that the Capital Outlay bill 


j 




recommended by the Governor for a speed up in the expansion plan of 






the University had passed the House with an amount of $12,868,000 






for new buildings. The Senate in their consideration of this 






measure had reduced the amount to $9,750,000 which is an amount 






approximately a million and a half dollars in excess of that 




1 


initially budgeted by the Trustees for this year. Final action on 




l 


the measure was still pending at the time of this meeting. 








i 



2030 



TRUSTEE 



President 



Accident 
Cases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Taber, a member of the Legislative Committee, 
reported that the bill filed by the Trustees to increase the salary 
of the President had been killed in the Senate. He asked that the 
Trustees instruct the Legislative Committee as to what further 
steps should be taken. Chairman Bartlett expressed the concern of 
all of the Trustees over the loss of this legislation. He pointed 
out that there was a lack of understanding of the magnitude of the 
President's job which was becoming larger every day with the in- 
creasing growth of the University. The Chairman instructed the 
Legislative Committee to file another bill immediately for the next 
session of the Legislature and in the meantime to follow up 
directly with the Governor and all other persons in positions of 
authority to obtain full support for this measure. 

Chairman Bartlett reported that the President had re- 
ferred to him a report by the faculty on the serious nature of 
personal liability that apparently might occur in the event of an 
accident in which students or others were injured or killed. He 
stated that he had been in communication with the Attorney General's 
office on this matter and that it appeared that it would be 
necessary to file legislation to obtain protection under certain 
existing laws now in the general laws. On motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the filing of a bill for the pro- 
tection of faculty and other employees arising 
out of tort cases that might be brought against 
them for actions occurring in line of duty. 

President Mather reported on new appointments, merit 

increases, step-rate increases and other compensation and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To make the appointments, merit increases, 
step-rate increases, extra compensation and 
other personnel actions contained in Schedule 
A which is attached to these minutes and here- 
by made a part of these minutes, this schedule 
having been in the hands of all Trustees prior 
to the meeting. 

On recommendation of the faculty and President Mather 



and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 



Degrees 



VOTED : To award the appropriate degrees to the indi- 
viduals who had completed the requirements for 
graduation at the end of the 1958 Summer Session 
as contained in Schedule B attached to these 
minutes which is hereby made part of these 
minutes. The names of David Southworth Kitson, 
Wayne Spencer Pray and Donald Keyes Whynott 
appearing on Schedule B were deleted subject to 
their satisfying their indebtedness to the Uni- 
versity. 

President Mather presented the recommendation of certain Richard G. 

Neumann 
members of the faculty of the Engineering School which was concurred Posthumous 



2031 



Personnel 
Actions 



by the Dean of the Engineering School, Registrar Lanphear and 

Provost McCune that a posthumous degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Electrical Engineering be awarded to Richard G. Neumann who was a 

member of the class of 1958 and had completed substantially all of 

the requirements for the degree prior to his untimely death. On 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Electrical Engineering posthumously to 
Richard G. Neumann. 

President Mather discussed the faculty salary situation 
and reported that he had been requested by the Governor to file a 
new faculty salary schedule with the Governor prior to December 15, 
1958. 

President Mather presented the name of Dr. John Gillespie, 
presently Director of the Bureau of Government Research at the Uni- 
versity, for the position of Administrative Assistant to the 



Degree 



2032 



TRUSTEE 

Adminis t rat ive 
Assistant to 
the President 

and 
Secretary of 
the University 



John 
Gillespie 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President and Secretary of the University. He stated that this 
position would have heavy administrative responsibilities and be 
directly in charge of the public relations of the University with 
the present News Office and University Editor reporting directly to 
this position. In addition the position would be responsible for 
the administrative work of the President's Office assisting the 
President with his duties and conducting research for the President 
on which administrative policy could be based. In addition to this, 
the position would be charged with the duties of the Secretary of 
the University. Chairman Bartlett stated that this was an ad- 
ministrative position much more important than that of Secretary 
and that it should be established as a major administrative position 
in the University. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Dr. John Gillespie Administrative 
Assistant to the President and Secretary of 
the University at the annual rate of $10,010 
(6th step), effective November 1, 1958. 

Trustee Schuck inquired if progress was being made in 
making arrangements for the employment of new faculty members in 
advance of the annual appropriation act. The President stated that 
he had explored this with administrative and legislative leaders 
and that to date no solution to this problem had been found. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 



^:^^c*etary_ 
pro tem 

Chairman 




These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



Schedule A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
October 11, 1958, 10:30 a.m., Student Union, Amherst, Mass. 

APPOINTMENTS AT MINIMUM 

ANNABLE, William P. , Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, effective 

October 5, 1958. To be paid 28 2/5-32nds of annual salary, not to exceed 
$3,830.45. B.S. in Agricultural Engineering, University of New Hampshire. 
Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, Syracuse, New York from 
June 1955 to October 1956. Since then has been on tour of commissioned 
military service. This position is to be supplemented by Experiment Sta- 
tion funds during the summer months to make it equivalent to an 'A" 
appointment. 

ARUNASALAM, V., Instructor in Physics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), effective 
September 1, 1958 at $1,438.66 per year. Graduate in Physics from Uni- 
versity of Ceylon. Has spent one year as graduate assistant to the Head 
of the Physics Department there. 

LIVINGSTON, Mrs. Martha C. , Instructor in Botany (% time), effective September 1, 
1958 at $1,079 for first semester only. A.B. Smith College; A.M. Duke 
University. Department Assistant in Botany at Smith College 1S54-56. 

McCAFFREY, Donald F., Assistant Professor of Education (Visiting Lecturer), 

(1/3 time) effective September 1, 1958 at $845.00 for the first semester 
only. B.S. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.Ed. Boston University. 
Has had 25 years of public school work including that of superintendent of 
schools. He is now Superintendent of Schools in Palmer. Has had previous 
employment on the faculty at University of Massachusetts. 

MURPHY, Francis M. , Assistant Professor of Education (1/3 time - Visiting 

Lecturer), effective September 1, 1958 at $845.00 for first semester only. 
A.B. Holy Cross; A.M. Columbia. Has had 33 years as a secondary school 
principal and has had previous employment on the faculty at the University 
of Massachusetts 

PLAZA, Alphonse A., Instructor in Chemistry, effective September 1, 1958 at 

$2,158 for first semester only. B.S. University of Massachusetts. He is 
now working toward his master's degree. 

SRILLIKGS, Mrs. Ruth, Instructor in Botany (% time), effective September 1, 1958 
at $1,079 for first semester only. B.A. Smith College. Has had previous 
employment an the faculty at University of Massachusetts. 

APPOINTME NTS AB OVE MINIMUM 

FEDERICO, Rodolfo, Instructor in Physics, effective September 1, 1958 at $5,564 
per year (maximum). Diploma of Civil Engineer from University of Buenos 
Aires. This is equivalent to our Master's degree. He has had three years 
with the Ministry of Public Works and three years with the Belgrano Rail- 
ways and has also taught Physics and Mathematics at secondary and college 
levels. 



Schedule A - page 2 

HEGARTY, Inez E. , Assistant Professor of Speech, effective Sept ember 1, 1959 
at $6,474 per year (maximum). A.B. and A.M. Mt. Holyoke College; Ph.D. 
University of Wisconsin. Former Director, Speech Clinic, Wellesley 
College 1944-49; presently Director of Speech & Hearing Therapy at 
Mt. Holyoke College. 

EERIT INCREASES 

COLVIN, Russell W. , Student Union Fo£ds Manager, effective October 5, 1958 from 
$5,538 to $5,772 (1 merit step). To be paid from Student U nion Food 
Service. 

HARTWELL, George E. , Assistant Foods Manager, effective September 1, 1958 from 
$4,628 to $4,823 (1 merit step). To be paid from Student Union Food 
Service . 

OTHER EMPL OYMENT 

MacDONALD, Winston, Assistant Freshman Football Coach, effective September 2, 
1958 to November 7, 1953 at $400 for the period, payable weekly. B.S. 
University of Massachusetts, 1257. To be paid out of 03 Funds. 

MEYERSTEIN, Rud, Instructor in Romance Languages, effective August 1 to 31, 
1958 at $400 for the period from Carnegie Funds. 

OTHER EMPLOYMENT G. E. PIT TSFIELD T R UST FUND 

M0HN, John W. , Associate Professor in Electrical Engineering, first semester 

of academic year 1958-59 at $940.95 plus transportation and meal allowance. 

STEP- RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the month of November, 1958. 



Schedule A - page 3 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

During the summer of 1953, the following faculty members were employed as 

counselors and advisors in the Freshman Counseling and Testing Program. Approval is 

requested that they be paid the sums indicated below for the periods of time 
designated. This is extra compensation for regular teachers. 



NAME 



Anderson, John 17. 
Barron, Mrs. Leone 



Bartlett, Lawrence M. 



Bischoff , David C, 



Boutelle, Harold A. 



Braunthal, Gerard 
Cary, Harold W. 
Clark, David R. 



Conlon, John T. 

Dickinson, David J. 
Dittfach, John H. 

Ellert, Fred C. 
Ferrigno, James M. 
Greenfield, Sumner M. 
Harris, John S. 
Haven, Richard 

Heller, Peter 
Helming, Vernon P. 

Hull, Alexander, Jr. 
Johnson, Robert B. 
Kauffman, Sidney W. 



datf;s of service 



TITLE 



Assoc. Prof., Acct. 
Instructor, English 
Assoc. Prof., Zool. 
Asst. Prof., Phys. Ed. 
Assoc. Prof., Math. 



Asst. Prof. , Government August 14 



Prof. , History 
Assoc. Prof. , English 



July 10,17,24 

June 28, July 11,18,25; 
August 1,8,15 



Asst. Prof., Ind. Admin. June 26; July 17,24,31 



Asst. Prof. , Math. 
Prof., Mech. Engin. 



Head, Dept. German 
Prof, , Rom. Lang. 



August 7 



July 24 



June 26; July 10,17,24 
31; August 7,14 

June 26, July 10 

July 17; August 7,14 



Asst. Prof., Rom. Lang. July 31 

Head, Government June 26; August 7,14 



Asst. Prof., English 

Assoc. Prof. , German 
Prof., English 



July 11,18,25; 
August 1,8 

July 31; August 7,14 



Asst. Prof., Rom. Lang. July 10 

Assoc. Prof., Rom. Lang. June 26; August 14 



AMOUNT 



July 31 


$25.00 


August 15 


20.00 


August 14 


25.00 


July 31; August 7 


25.00 


July 10,17,31; 
August 7,14 


125.00 



25.00 
75.00 

140.00 

100.00 
25.00 

175.00 
50.00 
75.00 
25.00 
75.00 

100.00 
75.00 



June 26; July 10,17,24, 

31; August 7,14 175.00 



25.00 



50.00 



Head, Phys. Ed. for Men July 10,17,24; August 14 50.00 



Schedule A - page 4 



NAME 



Koehler, G. Stanley 
Korson, J. Henry 
Lea, Henry A. 
Little, Henry II. 
Longs taff, John B. 



Ludtke, James B. 
McManamy, Mary E. 
McWhorter, Earl J, 
Mandel, Hanley 



Marcus, Joseph A. 

O'Donnell, William G, 
O'Leary, Helen F. 
Putala, Eugene C. 
Rauch, Harold 
Ritchie, Walter S. 
Rivers, Robert L 
Roberts, John L. 
Rogers, Vincent R. 
Rollason, H. Duncan 
Singer, Frank A. 
Smith, Harold L. 
Swart z, Marc J. 
Thies, Mrs. Emily P. 



TITLE 

Assoc. Prof. , English 
Head, Sociology 
Instructor, German 
Prof. , Chemistry 
Assoc. Prof. , Mech. Eng, 

Assoc. Prof., Bus. Ad. 
Instructor, Educa. 



Asst. Prof., Bact. 



DATES OF SERVICE 



AMOUNT 



June 23 




$20.00 


July 10,17,24 




75.00 


July 17,24 




50.00 


July 10,17 




50.00 


July 10,17,24,31; 
August 7,14 




150.00 


August 7,14 




50.00 


July 31; August 7 


,14 


75.00 


July 31; August 7 


,14 


75.00 



June 26; July 10,24,31; 
August 14 



Assoc. Prof., Civil Eng. June 26; July 10,17; 

August 14 



Professor, English 
Assoc. Prof. , Educa. 
Asst. Prof., Botany 
Assoc. Prof. , Zoology 
Head, Chemistry 



August 7,14 

June 26; July 10,17 

July 31 

June 26; July 10,17,24 

June 26; July 10,17,24 



Asst. Prof., Ind. Admin. August 14 
Asst. Prof., Physiology July 17,24 



Asst. Prof., Educa. 
Assoc. Prof. , Zoology 



June 26; July 10,17 
July 31; August 7,14 



Assoc. Prof., Account. July 10,17,24 

Instructor, Rom. Lang. July 24 

Asst. Prof., Sociology July 24; August 7 



Asst. Prof., Home Ec. 



Trumbull, Mrs. Ann H. Asst. Prof., Educa. 



August 14 



August 14 



125.00 

25.00 
50.00 
75.00 
25.60 
100.00 
100.00 
25.00 
50.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 
25.00 
50.00 
25.00 
25.00 



Weaver, William H. 



Head, Mech. Eng in. 



June 26; July 10,17,24,31; 
August 7,14 175.00 



Zeender, John K. 



Assoc. Prof. , History 



July 17 



25.00 



Schedule A - page 5 
APPOINTMENT ABOVE HIMIMUM 

METCALFE, William W. , Assistant Professor "A", 4-H (Assistant State Club 
Leader) effective November 2, 1958 at $6,708 per year (3 steps above 
minimum). B.S. University of New Hampshire. Has been working with 
Hampshire County Extension Service sines jane of 195G as a County Exten- 
sion Agent in 4-H Club Work. His work in that county was interrupted for 
a period of nearly two years because of military service. 

REAPPOINTMENT 

BOICOURT, Mrs. Ruth C. , Instructor in Hone F^onoirics (% time), effective 
September 1, 1958 at $1,131 for first semester only, D.S. Siumons 
College; M.S. Cornell University. Mrs*. Boicourt is a superior teacher 
and has an excellent background of experience in Chemistry and Foods. 
She has previously taught two semesters and is entitled to step 2. 

M ENTAL HEAL TH TRAINING GRANT - 2M-6244-C3 

RIGGS, Margaret M. , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, effective September 1, 
1958 at $450.00 for the first semester. B.A. Smith College: M.A. and 
Ph.D. Radcliffe College. Currently employed by State Department of 
Mental Health and will conduct two-hour seminar each week at University. 

SIMON, Walter B. , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, effective October 20, 1958 
to June 30, 1959 at $1,285.73 for the period. B.S. College of the City 
of ;:!ew York; M.A. Clark University; Ph.D. University of Indiana. From 
1955 to the present he has been employed as a Clinical Psychologist at 
the Tomah Veterans Hospital in Wisconsin. Will begin duties as a regular 
Psychologist at Northampton State Hospital October 20, 1953. 



'o* 



Schedule B 



DEGREES AWARDED OCTOBER 1958 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Cum Laude 
Norman Harris Frisble 



Morris Jacob Ankeles 
Marcia Lee Beardsell 
Roberta Ann Blackburn 
Cathleen Frances Clark 
Edward James Connelly Jr. 
William Joseph Cuneo 
Marie Frances Ferri 
Charles Melvin Gilboard 
Richard C. Gilgut 
Robert Francis Griffin 
Norman Leslie Harvey 

Mary 



Rite 

Walter L. Keaney Jr. 
David Daniel Kenefick 
Lee M. Linton 
Cynthia Louise MacKnight 
Arthur John Mahoney 
Stanley Montrose McDonald, Jr. 
Louise Fisher Mooers 
George Burden Munroe III 
Louis Edward Roncarati 
Gloria Schwartz 
Norman Adams Steeves 
Eleanor Wissenbach 



Donald Elmer Akerson 
Charles Philip Buck 
Theodore Robert Dudley 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 

Ronald Baker Lundgren 
Robert Hall Sturtevant 
Joseph Strait Whiting 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Rite 



Elmer Johnson Brooks 
Hillary Martin LeClaire Jr. 



Richard Warren Norcross 

V/ayne Spencer Pray 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADM IN I STRATI ON 



BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Rite 



Michael Leonard Corvin 
Roger Samuel Davis 
Joseph Roscoe Delamater 
Francis Dewey Gibbons 
William Guy Hogarth 
Charles Francis Holbrook 
Robert Prouty Johnston Jr. 
Daniel William Jordan 
Jack Gordon Kaufmann 
Kenneth Allen Kipnes 



Harry Gibson Lane 
Paul Wentworth Leathe 
John Joseph Martin 
Bruce L. Milne 
Nicholas Pawlak 
Raymond Spencer Proctor 
Peter St. Lawrence 
Robert Donald Schwartz 
Peter Jeremy Schwarz 
B # a»M '»£eye-S' Whynot-t 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Rite 



Lewis Benjamin Green 



Warren Arthur Hookway Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Richard Wallace Clement 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Rite 



Stephen Babbidge Bray Jr. 
Ronald Amos Bus hey 
Arthur Edward Gallant 



Henry Ellsworth Howes 
George Hyde Mars ton 
Robert Kendall Temple 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Cum Laude 
William Joseph Moriarty 



Algerd Basiulis 

Clifford Crane Fifield, Jr. 



Rite 



Anthony George Masulaitis 
Arnold Eugene Westlund Jr. 



SCHOOL OP HOME ECONOMICS 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 
Julia Blanchard Hartley 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Rite 
Ronald Eugene Pozzo 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 
CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 
FAIX 1958 



Jack Paul Brin 



MISTER OF AftTft 

Donald Joseph Roy 
IBISTSR QF ARTS JJ TEACHING 
Priori Haggerty Szymanski 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Donald Frederick Borgninc 
Claire T« Cadran 
i-fery Kathryn Crane 
Paul Joseph Crowley 
Eugene Benard DeFilippo 
Florence V. Draytryk 
James F« English, Jr« 
John Maurice Foley 
Philip Goorian 
Robert Oscar Havre s 
Harry R. Howard 
John J. Kupa 
John Dennis Lawlor, Jr. 
Roger W« Iawrence 
Deane Lee 

Donald Eugene Leger 
William V. Luti 
Francis P. Mslnerney 



Ray Kenneth McNamara 
Curtis Mbs singer 
Robert William Iforray 
Eleanor L« Niedeck 
H. Charles Nixon 
Thomas M» Ott 
Thomas Richard Parks 
Erwin Whittier Pearson 
lone Louise Pflug 
Robert Patrick Rounds 
Eric A. Sahlberg 
Dxtfight Morrow Scandrett 
Hira Singh 

Spyros A» Sophianopoulos 
Herbert Stone 
Raymond Francis Tirrell 
David Patrick Welch 
Joseph Edward Zalot 



MUSTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Orlo Allen Powell, Jr» 

MISTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Randall Bennett Haydon 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Harvey R, Levine 
September 4, 1958 



Entomology 



*"■■".. 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 20, 1958, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bart let t presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 
Miss Buxton, Cashin, Crowley, 
McNamara, Miss Schuck, Taber, 
Whitmore; Provost McCune, Secretary 
Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson 



On recommendation of Chairman Bartlett and motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. John Gillespie, Administrative 
Assistant to the President and Secretary of 
the University, as Secretary of the Board of 
Trustees. 

Dr. Bartlett explained the absence of President Mather 
who was a witness in a court case. He invited Dr. Shannon McCune, 
Provost, to represent the President. He also invited Mr. Charles 
F. Mahoney, Commissioner of Administration, and Mr. Kermit 
Morrissey of the Governor's Office to join the meeting. 

On invitation of Chairman Bartlett, Mr. Mahoney addressed 
the Trustees. His visit to the Board of Trustees' meeting was 
primarily to meet the members and to indicate his great interest in 
the University of Massachusetts. He assured the Trustees that they 
will continue to have the full support of the Governor for their 
programs. Mr. Mahoney indicated that the financial problems of the 
Commonwealth are serious and that a new source of revenue must be 
forthcoming. Because the fiscal condition of the Commonwealth is 
so relevant to the University of Massachusetts plans, the 
Commissioner urged the Board of Trustees to support revenue raising 
programs of the administration. Mr. Mahoney stated that the 



2033 



John 
Gillespie 



2034 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Governor's concern was for total higher education requirements of 
the Commonwealth and that the problems of higher education must be 
approached as a totality. Mr. Mahoney pointed out that the 
Governor has had the presidents of state educational institutions 
get together for the purpose of submitting a comprehensive report 
to him by December 15, 1958 on staff needs, administration require- 
ments and salaries. The recommendation by the Presidents will be- 
come a part of the revenue recommendation that the Governor makes 
to the Legislature, Mr. Mahoney emphasized that there will be no 
expansion without new revenues. He said that education is the 
highest personal priority of the Governor. He also said that he 
recognizes that deficiencies that may exist at the University can- 
not be removed overnight but that the Board of Trustees will at all 
times have the complete cooperation of the administration. 

In response to Mr. Mahoney 1 s statement, Chairman Bartlett 
emphasized that the Board of Trustees wants the University of 
Massachusetts to be a first-class university with first-class 
teachers. The great immediate need at the University is an in- 
crease in faculty salaries and the Board of Trustees will file a 
bill which proposes to increase salaries for the faculty and staff. 
He told Mr. Mahoney that it was the Trustees 1 responsibility to 
propose measures that would assure high quality education at the 
University. The Trustees cannot be charged with finding the 
revenue of running the state but they would cooperate with the 
Governor in his program for education in every possible way. 

Provost McCune explained in detail the President's 



recommended proposals for the personnel action as listed on 



I 



TRUSTEE 



i 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



attached Schedule A to these minutes. Treasurer Johnson pointed 

out that the new Instructor "A" appointment will not be teaching 

but will be an assistant to the Construction Engineer to help keep 

the huge building program on schedule. The new budget calls for a 

Junior Engineer and when that position is created, the person will 

be moved over to the new job. On motion duly made and seconded, 

it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Schedule A which is attached 
to these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

Mr. Mahoney stated that the Governor is cognizant of the ad- 
ministrative problems involved because the University of Massachu- 
setts does not have enough flexibility in filling new positions be- 
cause of the delay in creating these positions by the Legislature. 
The Governor has asked the Commission on Administration and Finance 
to work out a proposal by which this problem might be solved. 

At this point Commissioner Mahoney and Mr. Morrissey asked 
to be excused. 

Provost Shannon McCune discussed in detail the proposal of 
President Mather for salary increases for faculty and staff and 
optional grades for faculty. The proposal is for an increase of 
one grade at the lower level and two or more grade increases at 
the higher level. This is proposed in order to keep percentage in- 
creases in line. The optional grade feature for Assistant Pro- 
fessors, Associate Professors and full Professors is to set up a 
greater flexibility at the higher ranks. The optional grade would 
enable the University to hire exceptionally good people and to 
promote worthy faculty members. Because many professors are at 



2035 



Personnel 
Actions 



Salary 
Increases 



2036 



TRUSTEE 



Insurance of 
Motor Vehicles 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the last step of the grade, the Freedom Bill in reality no longer 
applies to them. While some members of the Board of Trustees felt 
that the salary proposal was not high enough, Provost McCune be- 
lieves that the salary increase plus the optional grades is 
realistic at the present time and would put the University of 
Massachusetts in a competitive position in hiring and retaining 
faculty. The optional grades are a continuation of the Freedom 
Bill principle which has worked so well for the University. 
Treasurer Johnson explained that the new proposed positions of 
Staff Associate and Staff Assistant would be utilized to fill 
temporary positions in the administration. 

Trustee Schuck wanted to be recorded as being opposed to 
a different job group for Dean of Men, U of M, 22, and Dean of 
Women, U of M, 20. Provost McCune explained that the different 
grouping was based on the principle of "equal pay for equal work". 
He pointed out that there are twice as many male students as female 
students at the University of Massachusetts. On motion duly made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the filing of special legislation 
with the next session of the General Court in 
substantially the form of the draft of the bill 
attached to these minutes as Schedule B. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Chairman of the Board of Trustees 

should sign the bill on behalf of the Board. 

Treasurer Johnson described hazards existing at the 

University of Massachusetts due to an absence of insurance 

coverage. He recommended that the Trustees authorize the filing 

of special legislation with the next session of the General Court 

in substantially the form of the draft of the bill attached to 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



these minutes as Schedule C. After discussion and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To lay on the table the proposal attached 
to these minutes as Schedule C and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of Trustee Brett and motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To ratify action taken by the Treasurer to 
use 173 Hartford Electric Light Company 
rights before they expired by authorizing 
the use of 170 rights and $952.00 in cash 
to buy ten shares of common stock and the 
sale of the remaining three rights. 

Trustee Schuck, who attended the National Consultive Con- 
ference on Religion in the State University at the University of 
Michigan, November 16 - 19, 1958, reported on the conference. She 
filed the conference literature with the Secretary of the Trustees 
so that it will be available to the members. 

Trustee Taber, who attended the Association of Governing 
Boards at Purdue University as a representative of the Board of 
Trustees, reported briefly on the meeting. 

Trustee Brett discussed the plan of action for new dormi- 
tories at the University of Massachusetts. Bids for a double unit 
men's dormitory and one woman's dormitory will be asked for within 
a month. Construction will start in the spring. These dormitories 
come under the $7,000,000 authorization. A student enrollment of 
6,000 depends upon completion of the new dormitories. 

Trustee Cashin reported that a committee of Cashin, Taber 
and Hoftyzer planned to meet with the Governor soon to discuss a 
bill to increase the President's salary. It is planned to refile 
the President's Salary Bill. 



,37 



Stocks 



President's 
Salary Bill 



2038 



TRUSTEE 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Speaking to a query made by Trustee Whitmore, Trustee 
Brett discussed the impact of Chapter 682, Acts of 1958, on the 
University of Massachusetts Alumni Building Corporation. He 
pointed out that the Corporation is brought under the terms of the 
law but that its wording is ambiguous. It is expected that it may 
cost the Corporation a little more to build because it does not 
have its previous freedom in dealing with sub -contractors. He 
feels that the Corporation can proceed orderly under the terms of 



the law. 



Provost Shannon McCune reported that the University of 



Massachusetts received two grants for summer institutes; one in 
Biology and one in Mathematics. The University also received a 
grant of $131,000 for the Science Center - Fourth Section. 
The meeting adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



These minutes were approved by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees at its annual meeting, February 17, 1959. 



Schedule A 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
November 20, 1958, 12:30 noon, Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Pers onne l Ac tions 

PROMOTIO NS 

Taylor, L. Lawrence, B.B.A. , Controller of the University, up-grade to 

Head of Department 'A fi , Group 22 (temporary position) $10,985 Federal 
Land-Grant Funds, effective December 1, 1958. 

Teahan, Francis J. , Purchasing Agent (state title Administrative Assistant) 
promote to Assistant Treasurer, Group 18 (temporary position) $6,812 
Federal Land-Grant Funds, effective December 1, 1S58, to be in charge 
of contracts and purchasing. 

Dietel, William M. from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of 

History at $5,538 per year, effective March 1, 1959. Holds B.A. from 
Princeton; M.A. from Yale and expects Ph.D. from Yale in June, 1959. 

NEW APPOINTMENT 

Ryan, Edmund John, Instructor "A" U of M, effective Feb:, aary 1, 1959 at 

$5,070 per year. B.S. in Civil Engineering, Univeisity of Massachusetts 
in January of 1959. 
NEW APPOINTMENT ABOVE MINIMUM 

Maier, Col. Oscar Carl, Associate Dean of School of Engineering, effective 
December 1, 1958 at $10,777 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. 
U.S. Military Academy, M.S. Yale and California Institute of Technology. 
Military service from 1936 - 1948; Director of Research and Development 
Department, Pullman- Standard Car Manufacturing Company from 1949 to date. 

LEAVE OF A BSENCE WITHOUT PAY 

Abramson, Doris E. , Instructor in Speech, for the academic year 1959-60. 
She will study at Columbia University under the Danforth Foundation. 

EXTRA COMPENSATION 

Conlon, John T. , Assistant Professor of Industrial Administration, for 

participating as a faculty counselor in the Summer Testing and Counsel- 
ing Program for July 10 and August 7 for $50.00. 

Reebenacker, Noel J., Intramural Director, $300, 9/1/58-6/1/59, Athletic Trust: 
STEP-RATE INCREASES Funds . 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable 
during the month of December, 1958. 









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Section 3. In Edition to the posies classified in Section 2 of this Act, 
there is hereby established in the pr< "•" °* the University of 

Hassachusetts the foil- 5 position titles m& classifications 

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Dean of the School ©f Business 

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Assistant Director, Audio-Visual ideation, 

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Secti© Any increases in rates in the General Sai&r; 
in Section 46 of Copter 30 of the General L*m. or my 
increases snppl shall be applied with e 
ti , , BinSectli : and 3 of this Act 



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quel force to all 



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on July 1, 1959 ano f« academic year positions on September 1, 1959.. 



11/13/58 



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An Act to Permit the Trustees of the* University of 
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